Glasgow Exhibitions

1888  International Exhibition of Science, Art & Industry

1901  Glasgow International Exhibition

1911  Scottish Exhibition of National History, Art and Industry

1938  The Empire Exhibition (Scotland)

1988  The Glasgow Garden Festival

Official Photographers

Annan were the official photographers for the 1888, 1901 and 1911 Exhibitions, all held at Kelvingrove Park.

Valentine were the official photographers for the 1938 Exhibition at Ballahouston Park.

Many photographs and postcards of the exhibitions were sold.  Some of the figures in the postcards (1901, 1911, 1938) are in fact artwork that was added after the photograph was taken.  This was to enable the Exhibitions to have postcards of 'busy exhibitions' for sale on the opening day.

 

International Exhibitions of Science, Art & Industry

1888

Edinburgh held an exhibition in 1886:

 'The International Exhibition of Science, Art & Industry'.

Glasgow Magistrates were invited to this exhibition and were impresses, so they arranged to hold their own exhibition.  Two years later, in 1888, they held

'The International Exhibition of Science, Art & Industry'.

[Stanley Hunter]

The Exhibition was held at Kelvingrove Park from 3 May until 10 November 1888, and attracted 5.7m visitors.

The exhibition had a Main Building with dome, Machinery Section, buildings for Women's Industries and Fine Art, and the Fairy Fountain.

[Glasgow's Great Exhibitions:  1888, 1901, 1911, 1938, 1988]

 

The Glasgow International Exhibition

1901

The Exhibition was held at Kelvingrove Park from 2 May until 9 November 1901, and attracted 11.5m visitors.

The exhibition had an Industrial Hall, a Grand Concert Hall, a Fine Arts Section and exhibition halls for Russia and Canada.

[Glasgow's Great Exhibitions:  1888, 1901, 1911, 1938, 1988]

 

Scottish Exhibition of National History, Art, and Industry

1911

Plans for the Glasgow Exhibition

Postcard of Glasgow Exhibition, 1911  -  Daylight fireworks

Following the Scottish National Exhibition held in Edinburgh in 1908, Glasgow held its Exhibition of National History, Art and Industry at Kelvingrove in 1911.

The British Journal of Photography reported that the Scottish Exhibition of National History, Art, and Industry was to remain open throughout the summer, and that Photography would be included within the Fine Art section.

James McKissack was to be Convener of the photographic section, supported by Archibald Cochrane and Frank P Moffat, all of whom had been associated with the Salon in earlier years.  

The exhibition was to include some work from past exhibitions and was to be by invitation and confined to Scottish workers.   [BJP 10 Feb 1911]

More details of the proposed exhibition were given in BJP in March 1911.  It was reported that the Fine Art section would be displayed in The Palace of Art, consisting of eight large galleries, and would illustrate the progress and development of Scottish Art over the past hundred years. 

The selection of the photographic exhibits appeared to be far from complete with a couple of months to go until the opening of the exhibition.  BJP reported:

".... [Messrs Cochrane, McKissack and Moffat]  will be glad to hear from Scotsmen in all parts of the world - and where are Scotsmen not to be found? -  who are photographers, and who may be in a position to send in representative  work.  Sons of Scotland will surely respond heartily to this call ..."

[BJP: 3 Mar 1911,  p.165]

Photographs in the Exhibition

The British Journal of Photography wrote a report on the Exhibition shortly after it opened.  The reporter welcomed the inclusion of 11 photographs by Hill & Adamson, but regretted that there was not a broader range of work representing early photography.  He felt that some of the photographer were not represented by their best work."

"... it is another proof that a man is not always the best judge of his own work".

The journal reported difficulty in making a harmonious whole of an exhibition in which:

"Modern has mostly the large mount and narrow frame, but some of the older work is shown in its original setting of a broad massive frame and no mount.  ...  Probably this explains some pictures being 'skied' while others are 'cornered'."

The article concluded:

"One feature of Scottish photographic exhibitions ... (we have alluded to it before in these columns) is the prominence of the professionals.

This indicates that these Scottish professionals must be keenly interested in photography as an art, apart altogether from business considerations, and yet many of them whom we have the pleasure of knowing personally are good men of business."

[BJP:  19 May 1911,  p.385]

Attendance

The Exhibition was held at Kelvingrove Park from 3 May until 4 November 1911, and attracted 9.4m visitors.

The exhibition had Kelvin Hall, a Palace of History, a Palace of Art and a Concert Hall.

[Glasgow's Great Exhibitions:  1888, 1901, 1911, 1938, 1988]

 

The Empire Exhibition (Scotland)

1938

The Exhibition was held at Ballahouston Park from 3 May until 29 October 1938, and attracted 12.6m visitors.

The exhibition had Palaces of Industry, a Palace of Engineering and an Amusement Park.

[Glasgow's Great Exhibitions:  1888, 1901, 1911, 1938, 1988]

 

The Glasgow Garden Festival

1988

The Exhibition was held at Prince's Dock from 28 April to 26 September 1988.

[Glasgow's Great Exhibitions:  1888, 1901, 1911, 1938, 1988]

 

OTHER EXHIBITIONS

Photographic Exhibitions

Edinburgh      Britain

Other Exhibitions:

Edinburgh        Glasgow

 

 

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