From a South Queensferry WW I Photo and Postcard Album

HMS Columbine

HMS Columbine

HMS Columbine - probably photogrraphed somewhere in the Firth of Forth

  Reproduced with acknowledgement to John Gordon, Easdale, Oban, Argyll & Bute, Scotland

  Enlarge this photo

       HMS Columbine - probably photogrraphed somewhere in the Firth of Forth

 

HMS Columbine

The Ship

Thank you to John Gordon for sending me the photograph above.  It comes from an Album of Photos and Postcards that that was kept during World War I by his great Aunt, Emily Borrowman, when she worked in the Post Office at South Queensferry.

John added:

"it appears that Emily spent almost all of WWI at South Queensferry, working at the Post Office.  When the Grand Fleet was in the Forth this must have been a busy Post Office."

John Gordon, Easdale, Oban, Argyll & Bute, Scotland:  February 5, 2013.

The Crew

Here is a photograph of the crew of Columbine, taken at the Queensferry studio of photographer, Peter McGill.  This also comes from the World War I Album that was kept by Emily Borrowman.

HMS Columbine - probably photogrraphed somewhere in the Firth of Forth

 

Message

1.

Al Lorentzen

Inverness, Illinois, USA

Thank you to Al Lorentzen who wrote:

HMS Columbine

    HMS Columbine - probably photogrraphed somewhere in the Firth of Forth

"HMS Columbine was a very strange looking vessel, indeed.  What was her purpose?  It looks asif she would capsize in even a moderate wind."

Al Lorentzen, Inverness, Illinois, USA

Answer?

I don't know the answer to Al's question above.  Perhaps somebody will email me with some information that I can pass on to Al.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  February 24, 2012

 

Message

2.

John Cavanagh

Durham City, Durham,  England

Thank you to John Cavanagh for replying to Al Lorentzen's question above.

John wrote

HMS Columbine

    HMS Columbine - probably photogrraphed somewhere in the Firth of Forth

"This ship was one of a long line bearing the name. 'HMS Columbine'. 

According to the history that I have, this particular one was purpose-built/converted in 1917 to serve as a depot ship based at Port Edgar, serving torpedo boats (destroyers).

Hence  the bulky shape.  She didn't have to go anywhere!"

John Cavanagh, Durham City, Durham, England  February 25, 2013

 

Message

3.

David Bain

Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England

David Bain read the Wikipedia entry for HMS Columbine, then  wrote:

HMS Columbine

    HMS Columbine - probably photogrraphed somewhere in the Firth of Forth

"HMS Columbine was an Osprey-class screw sloop launched as HMS Wild Swan in 1876, converted to a base ship and renamed HMS Clyde in 1904, renamed HMS Columbine in 1912 and sold in 1920.

There's mention elsewhere of HMS Columbine being a shore establishment for destroyers at Port Edgar so I presume the name transferred or was shared with what looks like an accommodation ship."

David Bain, Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England

 

Message

4.

Al Lorentzen

Inverness, Illinois, USA

Thank you to Al Lorentzen who wrote:

HMS Columbine

    HMS Columbine - probably photogrraphed somewhere in the Firth of Forth

"At first, I thought HMS Columbine might have been a 'prison hulk' as in days of old, but noted there were no bars on the windows."

Al Lorentzen, Inverness, Illinois, USA

Al also found an internet page featuring an early prison hulk - a large bulky vessel. 

The picture was captioned:

"The first prison hulks in England appeared after a 1776 act allowed them to be used to house prisoners."

 

Message

5.

Bob Hale

Gosport, Hampshire, England

Thank you to Bob Hale who wrote:

HMS Columbine

    HMS Columbine - probably photogrraphed somewhere in the Firth of Forth

"HMS Columbine was converted to a Depot Ship and my Grandfather joined the ship c1913 as a Marine."

Bob Hale, Gosport, Hampshire, England:  26 May 2016

 

Queensferry

 Around Edinburgh

 

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