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Growing up
in Broughton

including Powderhall Stadium and Puddockie

1.

Stewart Dickson
Craiglockhart, Edinburgh

-  Powderhall Stadium

-  Puddockie

2.

Sybil
Lynn, Massachusetts, USA

-  Powderhall Greyhound Racing

3.

Alex Dow
Fife, Scotland

-  Powderhall Greyhound Racing

4.

Bryan Gourlay
Biggar, Lanarkshire, Scotland

-  Powderhall Greyhound Racing

- Water Rats

-  Puddockie

Reply 1.

Matt Kennedy
Oakville, Ontario, Canada

-  Powderhall Entrance

Reply 2.

Jim Callender
Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada

-  Puddockie

5.

Stewart Dickson
Craiglockhart, Edinburgh

-  Place Names

6.

Donnie Graham
Zwickau, Germany

-  Growing up at Broughton

7.

Gerrard Grannum
Liberton, Edinburgh,

-  Growing up at Broughton

8.

Tommy (Campbell) Lawson
 Bribie Island, Queensland, Australia,

-  Growing up at Broughton

9.

David Mitchell
Portobello, Edinburgh

-  A Walk through St Mark's Park

10.

Jim Suddon
Morningside, Edinburgh

The Dump

-  St Mark's Park

-  Dustmen's Strike

-  Bailey Bridge

-  Flooding

-  'No Cycling'

-  Horse Show

-  Powderhall Stables

-  Bin Collection

11.

Bob Wilson
Leeds, West Yorkshire, England

-  Powderhall Greyhound Racing

12.

Bob Wilson
Leeds, West Yorkshire, England

-  Powderhall Stadium

        -  1870

        -  1930s to 1960s

        -  1980s and 1990s

13.

George T Smith
Leeds, West Yorkshire, England

-  Powderhall Stadium

        -  1870

        -  1930s to 1960s

        -  1980s and 1990s

14.

Jim Suddon
Morningside, Edinburgh

-  Bridge at St Mark's Park

15.

Donnie Graham
Zwickau, Germany

Broughton Road - Barbers

16.

Ian Thomson
Lake Maquarie, New South Wales, Australia

-  Navy Club - 1970s

17.

Danny Callaghan
Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland

Puddockie

-  Building Dams + Catching Minnows

Update

-  About 55 years later

18.

David Flucker
Kirknewton, West Lothian, Scotland

Powderhall Stadium

19.

David Flucker
Kirknewton, West Lothian, Scotland

Powderhall Stadium

-  Golf Practice Range

20.

Jim Callender
Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada

- Broughton Road

-  Shops

-  The Allotment

-  Duncan's Chocolate Factory

21.

Danny Callaghan
Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland

- Accident

-  Shops

-  Danny Drummond

-  Dahl's then Terry's

-  Radio Repairs then Bookie

22.

Catherine Lightfoot
Borders, Scotland

-  Powderhall Station

-  Broughton District

-  Leaving Edinburgh

23.

Barbara Edelberg

Powderhall Runners

24.

Ray Urwin
Northumberland

-  Powderhall Runner

-  Professional Footballer

25.

Andrew Queen

-  Powderhall Runner and Skater

26.

Allan Dodds
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Broughton Place Church

27.

Danny Callaghan
Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland

Broughton Place Church

28.

John Fraser
Australia

Puddiky

Boys' Brigade

29.

Allan Dodds
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Broughton Place Church

-  Amateur Dramatic Society

-  Warriston Crescent

30.

Alex and Eileen Sinclair
Corstorphine, Edinburgh

Powderhall Sprint, 1900

31.

Alex and Eileen Sinclair
Corstorphine, Edinburgh

Powderhall Sprint, 1900

-  Ornamental Vases

32.

Graham Simpson
Vancouver, British Columba, Canada

-  Friends

-  Tragic Accident

-  Amusing Incident

33.

Ian Layton
Cedar Creek, Texas, USA

Powderhall Stadium

34.

Allan Dodds
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Broughton Street

35.

Anne Cunliffe (née Pip Watt)
Edinburgh

-  Around Broughton Street

-  Kindergarten

-  Our house

-  Church

-  Play

36.

Scott Rendall

-  Broughton Star

-  William Rendall

37.

Ron Forbes
Majorca, Spain

-  Schools

-  Shops

-  Around Scotland Street

-  Return visit to Edinburgh

38.

Ron Forbes
Majorca, Spain

-  Scotland Street Lane (West)

-  John Wightman,  Egg Merchants

-  Geo. McCrae,  Potato Merchants

 

Recollections

1.

Powderhall Stadium and 'Puddockie'

Powderhall Stadium

Powderhall Stadium was used for many years, both for greyhound racing and for motorcycle speedway.   It was the home of Edinburgh Monarchs speedway.

There was a good view of the track from St Mark's Park.  The old track has now been demolished and new housing built on the land.

Edinburgh Monarchs moved to a new home at Armadale, West Lothian in 1996 and are still racing there now, in 2006.  Their name now is Edinburgh Scotwaste Monarchs.

'Puddockie'

'Puddockie' is from the early Scots name 'paddock haw'.  It was a part of the Water of Leith (now close to the Powderhall B&Q store) that was noted for frogs and toads.    ['The Place Names of Edinburgh', Stuart Harris]

However, Stewart Dickson, Craiglockhart, Edinburgh, has an alternative explanation.  He writes:

"Is a Puddockie not an in-between stage of a Tadpole becoming a Frog?"

   

Recollections

2.

Greyhound Racing

Sybil, from Lynn, Massachusetts, USA wrote:

Powderhall Greyhound Racing

"Then there was Powderhall dog racing track, Broughton school (my Alma Mater), and St Mark's park where I played."

Sybil:  January 22, 2006

 

Recollections

3.

Greyhound Racing

Alex Dow, Fife, Scotland replied::

Puddockie

"A small burn used to run across the middle of the track to Puddockie - The Water of Leith.

The dogs would slow up slightly as they crossed the two patches of softer ground, where the culvert was leaking."

Alex Dow, Fife:   March 30, 2006

 

Recollections

4.

Greyhound Racing

Bryan Gourlay, Biggar, Lanarkshire, Scotland wrote

Water Rats

"I was interested to see the comments about Powderhall.  I lived right opposite the entrance to the track, in Logie Green Road * up to the age of five. The punters used to sit on our garden wall waiting to get in, much to my mother's annoyance.

* Please see 'Powderhall Entrance' below.

Puddockie

I'd totally forgotten the Water of Leith was called Puddockie there. I used to look over the wall, fascinated by the water rats which were as big as cats.

Bryan Gourlay, Biggar, Lanarkshire, Scotland, March 31, 2006

 

Reply

 1.

Powderhall Entrance

Thank you to Matt Kennedy who wrote:

"The entrance to Powderhall Race track was, in fact, from Beaverhall Road not Logie Green Road.  Heading East on Broughton Road from Rodney Street, were:

Logie Green Road

Beaverbank Place , then

Beaverhall Road.

I was born in Beaverbank Place in 1923 and remember the area well including catching tadpoles at Puddickie.

Matt Kennedy, Oakville, Ontario, Canada:  May 29, 2009

 

Reply

 2.

Puddockie

Thank you to Jim Callender, now living in Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada, for sending me the photograph below, taken at Puddockie.  Please click on the photo to enlarge it and read more about it.

4 boys at 'Puddockie' ©

Jim Callender, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada: April 9, 2007

 

   

Recollections

5.

Place Names

Stewart Dickson, who now lives in Craiglockhart, Edinburgh wrote:

Friends

"I've always had an interest in the history of the area and have spoken to older people who have lived in the area all their life.  I have a photo of myself and friends with fishing nets at Puddockie circa 1966.  We all lived in the area, Beaverbank, Logie Green, Broughton."

Books

I had a small A5 book some time ago.  It was independently produced and covered Broughton, Canonmills and Powderhall.  I've also read Cassell's 'Old & New Edinburgh' and found that names I thought we, as kids, had made up would seem to be much older.

Dizzy or Dissie

The area next to Broughton Road Bowling Green was called the Dizzy or Dissie.

Hundred Walls

The Gardens at the back of East Claremont Street backing on to Broughton Road were the Hundred Walls.

Sandy Hills

The now enclosed hill behind Broughton Road was the Sandy Hills.

Cat Weasel

The old water tank that sat next to Broughton Swing Park was the Cat Weasel (after the 70`s show).

The Ditch

The site of the Vogue Furniture car park was the Ditch.

The Shovel Works

Behind the now Tesco was The Shovel Works.

Stewart Dickson, Craiglockhart, Edinburgh: August 7 + 8, 2007

   

Recollections

6.

Growing up at Broughton

Thank you to Donnie Graham , now living in Zwickau, Germany, who wrote:

Friends

"I see Stewart Dickson has written in about his memories of place names.   In the 1960's. as boy I lived next door to Stewart in Beaverbank Place.  As I remember, we played a lot together as kids."

Shovel Works and Tunnel

"My adventures of growing up there were sneaking into the Spade and Shovel Works (now Tesco).   Myself and others would go through the tunnel to Scotland Street coal yard.  Half way through, someone would shout: 'There's a Train coming!'  Then we'd run like hell.  I think, actually, it had been disused for years."

Broughton Swing Park

"In the Broughton swing park they use to have old Parky, who sat in his small shed in the corner of the park.  In winter he would never come out, preferring to huddle round his stove.

Puddockie and Cemetery

"I also remember fishing with nets at the "Puddockie".  Sometimes we would venture into Warriston Cemetery and try to find the grave of the 'Red Lady'.  It was good fun.  I think it's great to reminisce about the unique place where you once grew up."

Donnie Graham , Zwickau, Germany, November 12, 2007

   

Recollections

7.

Growing up at Broughton

Thank you to Gerrard Grannum, now living at Liberton, Edinburgh, who wrote:

Move to Broughton Road

"When my  Grandfather died in 1949 we lived at Albion Road.  We had to leave there because the house was rented and the landlord had allocated it to other tenants.

With the money that was left to my Mother from her Father's will she bought a flat at 109 Broughton Road for £350.  I lived there from 1950 to 1994,   I got married in 1993 and moved up to Howden Hall Road, Liberton in 1994."

School

"As a youngster, life was one long adventure.  I went to Broughton Road Primary School at the top of the hill (I now know it as Broughton Point ) and I learned to swim at the school as there was a small swimming Pool in the basement area.

'The Dizzie'

"Opposite the school there was a Gents Public Toilet and to the right of it was the Public Bowling Greens (still there) but to the left of the toilet was our adventure area called 'The Dizzie'.

We played Japs and Commandos, and we stored all our old wood, chairs and any other rubbish that was for the Bonfire which was burnt on the road at the junction Broughton Road and East Claremont Street."

Our Gang

"Our gang consisted of myself Gerry Grannum, Jimmy Henderson, Davie Alexander, Kenny Johnston, Jim Black and a couple of others whose names escape me.

We also kept feral pigeons there in cages we knocked up from old wood and chicken wire.  The pigeons we collected from the old Chancelot Flour Mill which dominated the landscape with its large clock tower."

Water of Leith

"During the school summer holidays the Water of Leith from Puddiekie to the dam at Redbraes was our happy hunting ground. If we weren't fishing for minnows and sticklebacks there was always a wooden raft we would be playing on."

Conkers

"Warriston Cemetery was where we got our conkers from in the autumn. Hendo and I who were the tallest of the gang would climb up an old chestnut tree near to the top and start shaking the branches and the conkers would rain down like hailstones."

Apples

"Across the road from my stair entrance were the back gardens of East Claremont Crescent and most of them had apple trees in growing in them - too good a temptation for a youngster to resist.

Invariably I always got caught, or a nosey neighbour who lived on the first flat of my stair and faced the front would see me and tell my Mother and Here ends part one of my boyhood tale.

Here ends part one of my boyhood tale."

Gerrard Grannum, Liberton, Edinburgh:  November 19, 2007

 

Recollections

8.

Growing up at Broughton

Thank you to Tommy (Campbell) Lawson, now living in Bribie Island, Queensland, Australia, who wrote:

Musselburgh, Broughton, Puddockie, RAF, Australia

"I was born in Musselburgh (High st), lived in Edinburgh. and attended Broughton High School and was evacuated to Dollar during the war years.

I joined the RAF in 1947.  After demobilisation, I lived in Blackpool for a couple of years then migrated to Australia in 1952. 

In Edinburgh, I lived in Logie Green Road with my family, close to Powderhall Dog Track!!!  I used to paddle around in Puddockie in the Water of Leith near Logie Green Road.  We had a shop in Logie Green Road and later in Rossie Place.

I'd love to hear from anyone of that era.  My Edinburgh friends were   George Reid, Doug McCaskill and Kenny Laird, now all deceased.  I last visited Edinburgh in 1981.

Tommy (Campbell) Lawson, Bribie Island, Queensland, Australia:  March 26, 2008

Contacting Tommy

If you would like to contact Tommy, please email me, then I'll pass your message on to him.

Thank you.    -  Peter Stubbs

 

Recollections

9.

A Walk through St Mark's Park

Thank you to David Mitchell, Brunstane, Edinburgh, who wrote:

St Mark's Park

"There was a cycle track in St Mark's Park in the early 1960s. There were no facilities, just a modest sized oval dust track, but it attracted a good number of cyclists and spectators.

As children, we would trudge across the park on a Saturday evening, laden with leeks and potatoes from our dad’s allotment which was in the shadow of Chancelot Mill."

Cycling

"We were always glad to stop for a few minutes to watch a race or two.  It gave us time to retrieve the socks that crept off our feet as we marched along in our wellie boots."

Football and Greyhound Racing

"Sometimes there would  be a football match in progress, or if we were lucky, we were allowed to stand and watch the greyhounds racing at Powderhall, a good view could be had from the footpath at the bridge over the Water of Leith.  The best bit of the race was watching the man at the finish dropping a large box over the mechanical hare to stop the dogs from finding out that it was stuffed."

Tadpoles

"In the spring, while we watched the greyhounds, our Dad would go down the slippery descent down the side of the bridge to the river and fill a jam jar with pondweed to take home to feed to our tadpoles."

Bakery

"No matter how tired or burdened we were, we never objected to the short detour to the Redbraes Bakery in the lane at the top of Broughton Street.

Here we descended into the warm, flour-dusted bakehouse where the baker would fill brown paper bags with hot rolls.  The smell of the fresh bread powered our journey back up McDonald Road as we were anxious to have our supper while it was still warm."

David Mitchell, Brunstane, Edinburgh:  April 25, 2008

 

Recollections

10.

Growing up at Broughton

Thank you to Jim Suddon, Morningside, Edinburgh, who wrote:

The Dump

"In the 1940s and 1950s, 'The Dump' was a large hole filled in by the Corporation with the city rubbish, in those days mainly ashes from coal fires.

When it was completed, top soil was added and grass seed sown and trees were planted around the sides.  I was one of the many pupils at Broughton Secondary School who planted trees in 1953 to celebrate the Coronation."

 St Mark's Park

"It is now known as St Mark's Park.  It is bordered

-  at the south end by the Water of Leith

- on its eastern side by a railway line

- on its north side by the allotments."

Dustmen's Strike

"One year, the dustmen had a strike and us kids made a bit of money by taking buckets to the dump on our guiders.  A shilling was the going rate and you could take three buckets at a time."

Bailey Bridge

"The Bailey Bridge, which linked the park with the path from MacDonald Road, used to give a good view to the dog racing track in Powderhall Stadium below.  It was frequented by the poorer gentlemen on the race nights, twice weekly.   They also had a bookie who took bets.  The announcer's voice could be heard clearly on the bridge.

Dog racing was popular in Edinburgh and Powderhall attracted large crowds.  There was also a stadium at Stenhouse on the north/wester side of Edinburgh."

Flooding

"I also remember seeing men in a rowing boat on the stadium in August 1949.  There were 19 greyhounds drowned in the kennels when the river overflowed.  It is now the site of houses so I hope that the experiences of those floods were not lost on the builders."

'No Cycling'

"The path through the park was a 'no-cycling' path and one risked being caught by the policeman whom we were sure had a back window along the path from the Police Box at the MacDonald Road end. 

Names were taken a threats of five shilling fines were made.  He was more strict about no rear lights and you had to promise you were walking with your bike and would not be riding it before he let you away."

Horse Show

"I remember a horse show being held in Powderhall Stadium.  It had been moved from Stenhouse, one Saturday, and about twenty Canadian Mounted Police appeared near the bridge on their horses.  They had got lost and were trying to find the route to Powderhall.   I wish I had had a camera to record this site"

Powderhall Stables

"The stables at the cleansing departments premises in Broughton Road, opposite MacDonald Road, were used by the horses of the soldiers who took part in the tattoo each August/September.

This started in 1949 but it would be the 1950's when it attracted bigger crowds as the seating stands were enlarged on the esplanade.

The Lifeguards were often there, and one year it was a troop of French cavalry.  The people used to come down to see them ride out about 8.30 p.m. on their way to the Castle.  The Drum Horse, in those days, was very famous and was called Pompei.

Bin Collection

The stables had been in use until the late 1940s, as the buckets were emptied into horse-drawn carts.  They had roofs on them and sliding doors around the sides but there was always a lot of mess on a windy day.  You passed by when the men were about to pick-up a bucket and not when it was being emptied.

Jim Suddon, Morningside, Edinburgh:  February 20, 2009

 

Recollections

11.

Bob Wilson

Leeds, West Yorkshire, England

Thank you to Bob Wilson for posting a message in the Edinphoto guestbook.

Bob wrote:

Powderhall Greyhound Racing

"I remember going to Powderhall Greyhound stadium, which once had a race that included the world famous greyhound 'Pigalle Wonder', owned by Al Burnett, a London nightclub owner. The dog  cost £2000 (?) in 1956."

Bob Wilson, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England:
Message posted in EdinPhoto guest book, April 23, 2009

 

Recollections

12.

Bob Wilson

Leeds, West Yorkshire, England

Here are more extracts from comments added by Bob Wilson to the Edinphoto guestbook.

Bob wrote:

Powderhall Stadium

1870

"Powderhall Stadium, was originally built in 1870 for cycling and athletics.  It fell into decline and was converted to a greyhound racing stadium. Over 10,000 people attended the first meeting held 3rd August 1927. The long, grass straights from the dog release traps meant safe running conditions and fast times.

1930s to 1960s

"In its early days as a greyhound stadium, the main racing event was the Edinburgh Cup, first run in 1933.  Greyhounds trained in London won the Scottish Greyhound Derby ten times before 1960, including wins for one of the greatest greyhounds ever to race at Powderhall stadium, Pigalle Wonder.

In the 1940s, the stadium was the pride of Scottish greyhound racing.  My gran lived within walking distance of this track, and I spent many a pleasant summer evening there on my annual visits.

The sport of greyhound racing thrived throughout Britain, in the 1940s, but in 1960 it was killed off by the arrival of the national TV service.  No one wanted to go to a often cold, blustery dog track when they could sit at home and watch free TV, especially Coronation Street."

1980s and 1990s

"In 1988 the Greyhound Racing Association, the GRA, sold the track to local businessman Norrie Rowan, who sold it on to Coral the Bookmakers for an instant profit.

In 1992, the stadium was taken over by Eddie Ramsay, a nightclub owner, but in 1995 it went bankrupt.  Its terraces were bulldozed for housing development."

Bob Wilson, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England:
Message posted in EdinPhoto guest book, April 25, 2009

 

Recollections

13.

George T Smith

Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

George T Smith wrote:

Question

Totalisator

"My father worked part time at Powderhall to augment his wages as an  electrician in Corporation housing.  He maintained the Totalisator.

 I  never understood what this machine was. In retrospect it seems to have  been some form of early computer.  Can anyone provide a simple  explanation?"

Answer

Totalisator

The Totalisator, usually referred to as the Tote Board, is a large board with an alphanumeric display, showing the odds for each horse or greyhound at a race track.

The original to Totalisator was installed in New Zealand in 1913.  Early models were mechanical.  Today, they are computer-based and use software for calculating pay-outs.  All bets of a particular type are pooled, taxes and a 'house take' are deducted, then odds are calculated to enable the amount remaining to be allocated to the winning bets.

Peter Stubbs:  May 31, 2009

 

Recollections

14.

Jim Suddon

Morningside, Edinburgh

Thank you to Jim Suddon who wrote again, following his recollections in `0 above.

Jim wrote

Bridge at St Mark's Park

"We recently discussed what had been in place prior to the Bailey Bridge being built across the Water of Leith at St Mark's Park.  I could remember something, but had thought that it had been the remains of a previous bridge.

I recently met a gentleman who had been brought up in Warriston Road and he informed me that there had never been a bridge but a pipe, possibly gas, which he and others used as a bridge to get to and from Broughton School. 

I also remembered crossing the pipe but that was for fun as the Bailey Bridge was then in place

I assume the pipe was gas as this was probably the main pipe from Granton Gas Works to the gas container at MacDonald Road, opposite Broughton Secondary and beside the Cat and Dog Home."

Jim Suddon, Morningside, Edinburgh:  July 30, 2009

 

Recollections

15.

Growing up at Broughton

Thank you to Donnie Graham , now living in Zwickau, Germany, who wrote:

Broughton Road  -  Barbers

"When I was visiting Edinburgh a couple years ago, I was giving my wife a 'guided tour' around the area where I grew up in the 1960s. On reaching the top of Broughton Street, I stumbled across a wee barber's shop that I went to as a boy.

Peering through the window, I was amazed to see that nothing had changed over the years.  Even the old barber's chairs were still there, almost museum pieces!

I always remember, before my father sent me on my way for a haircut he would always tell me:  'And don't forget!  Ask for a Perry Como', so off I'd go, not having a clue who Perry Como was, and trying not forget the name before I got there!

Inside the barbers was a bench where you sat waiting your turn, then a shout would come, 'NEXT!', and in my case, out came the small plank, laid across the arms of the chair.  Sitting on it brought me to the adult's level!.

'So what can I do for you today, sonny?' asks the barber, 'A Perry Como please!', I replied.  After he'd finished I thought to myself:  'That's interesting.  Obviously, Mr. Como has a bowl cut too!'.

Donnie Graham , Zwickau, Germany, September 28, 2009

Recollections

16.

Ian Thomson

Lake Maquarie, New South Wales, Australia

Thank you to Ian Thomson, Lake Maquarie, New South Wales, Australia for allowing me to reproduce this photo.

Ian wrote:

'Navy Club'  -  1970s

   A group of ladies at Royal Navy & Royal Marine Association & Club (Edinburgh), 1 Broughton Road, Edinburgh ©

Please click on this photo to enlarge it.

"This picture is of a happy crowd of ladies at the 'Navy Club'.  It was given to me by my mother in law, Jean Kernan, who is middle-left in the photo.  My wife tells me that the ladies had been on a bus tour then returned to the club.

The photo was taken some time in the 1970s.  The club was opposite The Ritz cinema in Broughton Street.  We used to go there on a Saturday night.  We had some great singsongs there. It was altogether a great crowd.   |I think there were a lot of Leithers there.  I wonder if anybody can name any  of them.  The club had a full-size billiard table upstairs.

I wonder if the club is still going." *

Lake Maquarie, New South Wales, Australia:  May 5+9, 2010

* Yes. See below. -  Peter Stubbs

The Club

The club is still going.  Its address is at Heriot Hill House, 1 Broughton Road, Edinburgh.   I've just checked the Internet and found that:

-  SE Scotland Wargames Club meets there on Thursday evenings.

-  There is jazz on Sundays  ('Big Band Sundays').

-  There was a 'Valentine Funky Dress' evening in February 2010.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  May 13, 2010

 

Recollections

17.

Danny Callaghan

Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland

Thank you to Danny Callaghan who wrote:

Puddockie

"I was looking through my dad's old transparencies and found this picture which he took, probably in 1956/57.

Puddockie  on the Water of Leith at Warriston  -  Looking to the NE across the water towards Warriston Cemetery from Warriston Road  -  1956/57 ©

Please click on this photo to enlarge it.

The picture is of me and my pal and his sister building dams in the Water of Leith at Puddockie at Warriston Road.   It is opposite the B&Q warehouse.

You can clearly see the gravestones in Warriston Cemetery above us.   I remember that at the point where we were, on the  north side of the river, there was a cobbled way, out of the water and along the river bank for a bit.  If memory serves, there was something similar on the south side of river.

It looks as if there could have been a ford or similar before the old bridge was built over the river.  I remember them building the current concrete bridge, probably in the mid-1950s."

Building Dams and Catching Minnows

"Catching minnows, sticklebacks  and building dams at that spot was the order of the day.

Magnus Flucker and his sister Margaret are in this photo with me.  I'm facing the camera.    We used to disappear there all day in the summer holidays and our mums and dads knew exactly where to hunt for us."

Danny Callaghan, Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland:  May 17, 2010

Update

About 55 years later

Thank you to Danny for writing again in February 2011 after returning to Puddockie with his camera.    Danny wrote:

Water of Leith at Warriston Road

"This photo was taken from slightly higher than the earlier photo because there is now a flood defence barrier on the south bank of the Water of Leith, where the photo was taken from."

 Puddockie  on the Water of Leith at Warriston  -  Looking to the NE across the water towards Warriston Cemetery from Warriston Road  -  2011 ©

Warriston Cemetery

"The most notable thing is the destruction of Warriston Cemetery.  Only one headstone can now be seen standing in this part of the cemetery."

Danny Callaghan, Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland:  February 16, 2011

 

Recollections

18.

David Flucker

Kirknewton, West Lothian, Scotland

Thank you to David Flucker who wrote:

Powderhall Stadium

"Powderhall Stadium is where most boys who lived in the Broughton area went to  watch the greyhound racing.  We did this, usually, by climbing the fence at St Marks park or at the bottom of the Dizzy.

It was fun trying to predict the winner.  As we got older, we would bet and drink, usually under-age, before hitting the town to go clubbing."

David Flucker, Kirknewton, West Lothian, Scotland:  June 16, 2010

 

Recollections

19.

David Flucker

Kirknewton, West Lothian, Scotland

Thank you to David Flucker who wrote again with more memories of Powderhall Stadium.

David wrote:

Powderhall Stadium

"The main entrance to Powderhall Stadium was in Beaverhall Road, but there was  also an entrance in Logie Green Road where there was also a large car  parking area next to Waterstones at the bottom on the right.

Golf Practice Range

Also in  this area, prior to B&Q ** being built, there was a golf practise range  where we would go and hit a few balls.

I remember once whilst  practising being hit on the head by my friend Mickey Corrie as he  took a step backwards as he was swinging his club.  The result, a very sore forehead"

David Flucker, Kirknewton, West Lothian, Scotland:  June 16, 2010

**  B&Q is a 'Do-it-Yourself' store in Warriston Road, near Puddockie.  When the store opened its name was Dodge City.

 Recollections

20.

Jim Calender

Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada

Thank you to Jim Calender who wrote:

Broughton Road

"I was born at 47 Broughton Road and lived there until 1947, then moved to Broomhouse.  I went to Canonmills Primary School, then Bellevue High School.

I have to mention that 47 Broughton Rd., has already been demolished and rebuilt, as can clearly be seen on the left on this photo."

The corner of Broughton Road and Beaverbank Place  -  June 2010 ©

Shops

Danny Drummond
George Dahl
Guthrie's

"Living at Broughton, as a boy, I remember a greengrocer called Danny Drummond's (Licensed), at the corner or Beaverbank Place and Broughton Road.  I delivered groceries for him on a Saturday morning with a hand cart.

On the opposite corner was George Dahl, a Barber and Newsagent.  I delivered papers, morning and night, for him.  In the evening there were two runs, one was the 'Six Edition'.  When you were finished that run, you were just in time to start the 'last run', so I knew that area very well.

At the corner of Logie Green Road and Broughton Road, there used to be a store there called Guthrie's.  It was kind of like a Deli.  He sold candies, and cold cuts which he sliced by hand-cranked slicer."

The Allotment

"When I was a boy, that piece of land that is being dug up on Logie Green Road was called 'The Allotment'.

The backs of the homes at the south end of Beaverbankl Place  -  View from Logie Green RoadJune 2010 ©

"It was a great playground for kids, and I always remember a great big bonfire on Guy Fox Night which took weeks to gather all kinds of debris and wood that would burn.  I have many fond memories in the allotment."

Duncan's Chocolates

"My mother used to work in Duncan's Chocolate Factory which was at the bottom of Beaverhall Road.  She used to bring us home the scraps of chocolate that they couldn't sell."

Jim Calender, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada:  June 17, 2010

 

Recollections

21.

Danny Callaghan

Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland

Thank you to Danny Callaghan who followed up some of the points in Jim Calender's recollections (20 above).

Danny wrote:

Accident

"There was  tragic accident at the bonfire in May 1948 referred to here in my Broughton recollections.  My cousin was seriously injured and later died from the injuries.   His mother latterly stayed in the main-door flat of No 47 Broughton Road."

Shops

Danny Drummond

"Like Jim, I also worked for Danny Drummond.  I did deliveries for him at New Year and also the new owners of the shop.    I remember this was in the early years of canned beer. McEwans Export was delivered from the brewery, still very hot.

No sooner was it in the shop than I was off delivering it.    I always found it strange that it was the people who I would consider to be the least well off, who would have the largest Hogmanay order and who also tipped the best. 

On Hogmanay evening there was always a big queue of folk trying to buy their New Year drink, and it was almost impossible to keep the shelves stocked.   At that time Bells whisky and McEwans export were the best sellers.  The shop ran a Hogmany club and something was added each week, some people starting in January."

Dahl's then Terry's

"Dahl's had a screen across the shop.  The barber with, I think, two chairs was at the back of the shop.    When Dahl was cutting your hair and someone came into shop he went off and served them.

Dahl's shop later became Terry's newsagent, and the barber disappeared.    The Terry's then bought an up-market shop at Craiglockhart.   Their old shop is now a language school."

Radio Repairs then Bookie

"Next door to Dahl's, there was a radio repair workshop which has a basement and was run by a Pole.    I used to go in there a lot.  The basement was the workshop.  It led out to the backgreen of 34 Beaverbank Place.  I'm sure the family lived in the shop.

Dahl's then became a bookie.  My uncle Mike (the Store milkman) used to work sometimes in the bookie.    My dad was a regular punter but only small bets, doubles, trebles etc.

I remember him watching races on TV, then running down the stair and across the road before a race started.   My dad, being of Irish origin, always bet on the Irish horse, even if it had 3 legs!"

Danny Callaghan, Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland:  June 29, 2010

 

Recollections

22.

Catherine Lightfoot

Thank you to Catherine Lightfoot who wrote:

Powderhall Station

"I was born at Powderhall Station on Broughton Road.  This was sited between the corporation building and the park before Redbraes Immediately opposite was Brown Bros and next to that was Rosebank Cemetery. 

Powderhall was on the suburban line to Newhaven, carrying passenger and freight but trains they no longer stopped at Powderhall Station.

Our house, and the one on the other side of the line, was converted from the waiting rooms and rented out to railway workers.  My father was a passenger guard operating from Waverley.

To access the station you entered by a door between two large pillars (still there) at street level.  There were then two flights of steep steps down and a long path to reach the house.

The station is no longer there but I believe the line still operates from Newhaven to Powderhall with, I think,  waste.  We left Edinburgh in 1947 when my father became a stationmaster on the Edinburgh-Carlisle line in the borders."

Broughton District

I attended Broughton Primary School.  I remember Mr Kippen the headmaster and Miss Docherty the swimming teacher.

I remember all the streets surrounding Broughton Road and in particular Pudicky which was at the bottom of Logie Green Road and was where we paddled in the water of Leith."

Leaving Edinburgh

During the war, I was evacuated to relatives in the Borders in 1940.  Later, in 1947, our family left Edinburgh when my father became a stationmaster on the Edinburgh-Carlisle line in the Borders."

Catherine Lightfoot:  November 3, 2010

Recollections

23.

Barbara Edelberg

Barbara Edelberg wrote:

Powderhall Stadium

Professional Runners

"My father was a professional runner and won many races at Powderhall in the 1920s   His name was Peter Gilhooly and his professional name was 'Gilbert of Broxburn'.

Do you have any knowledge of those races, pictures etc., before Powderhall went to the dogs, so to speak?

Barbara Edelberg:  December 14, 2010

Reply to Barbara?

I have found a few photos of the Powderhall Sprint on the Scran web site, but all are from the 1950s and 1960s.

If you know of any earlier reports or photos of the professional runners at Powderhall and would like to send a reply to Dorothy, please email me, then I'll pass it on to her.

Thank you

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  December 18, 2010

 

Recollections

24.

Ray Urwin

Northumberland, England

Ray Urwin wrote

Question

Professional Runner

"My father, Joseph Sidney Urwin, was born in 1909 at High Spen, County Durham.  I understand that he ran in the Powderhall Sprint in the 1920s.   Is there any way to find out if and when he competed and the result of his races?

Professional Footballer

"He went on to play professional football in the late-1920s and early -1930s for Derby, Lincoln City and Bradford."

Ray Urwin, Northumberland, England:  February 4, 2011

Reply to Ray?

I don't know the answer to Ray's question above, other than to suggest that it may be worthwhile looking up old editions of The Scotsman newspaper  on The Scotsman Archive web site, if he is willing to pay the charge to use this service.

 If you feel that you may be able to help Ray to find an answer to his questions, please email me, then I'll pass on your message to him.

Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  February 4, 2011

 

Recollections

25.

Andrew Queen

Andrew Queen wrote:

Question

Running and Skating

"My father, Andrew Queen, always says he held a record for being the fastest runner or roller skater, 1940s onwards.

Does anybody know anything about this record?   I would be very surprised if anybody came up with anything, but proud.

Andrew Queen:  July 15, 2011

Reply to Andrew?

If you would like to send a reply to Andrew, please email me, then I'll pass  your message on to him.

Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  July 19, 2011

 

Recollections

26.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Allan Dodds wrote

Broughton Place Church

"Before the days of television, people used to make their own entertainment. At Broughton Place Church which my parents, Aunt and Uncle attended, one-act and three-act plays were often performed

My mother often produced these plays (frequently taking the lead part herself as she had a formidable memory for lines) and my father was responsible for the stage lighting. As a young child I had to listen to my mother rehearse her lines so that by the time the play was performed I knew every part and line in it including the plot!

As Robert Kemp the Playwright lived across the road my mother would often choose one of his plays to put on. I remember one called 'The Scientific Singers'.

We felt immensely proud to be living across the road from one of Scotland's great living literary figures - although I'd be surprised if Robert Kemp ever learned that my mother was producing his plays just up the road as we toerags from the tenements in Howard Street were supposed to be utterly devoid of culture!"

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  October 4, 2011

 

Recollections

27.

Danny Callaghan

Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland

After reading comments from Allan Dodds (26 above) Danny Callaghan wrote:

Broughton Place Church

"This church, I believe, lay empty for some time but recently featured on a TV programme about bringing old churches / buildings back to life.

The church is now used by Lyon & Turnbull auctioneers and, from what was said in the programme, they have retained the building and interior very much as it was.  I'm sure Allan will be pleased to see the building alive and well used."

Lyon & Turnbull Auctions

"Many will remember Lyon & Turnbull in their George Street premises and their famous Lane Sales out the back in Thistle Street South West Lane.    I used to work almost next door at Roneo, 47a George Street and it used to be a nightmare getting into our back door on sale days, although it was fun having a good rummage.    Lyon & Turnbull used to be one of my Dad's haunts and there was many a thing he bought, both in their Saleroom and in the Lane Sales."

Danny Callaghan, Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland:  June 29, 2010

 

Recollections

28.

John Fraser

Australia

Thank you to John Fraser who wrote:

Puddiky

"Having lived in Australia for many years I am really enjoying your Edinburgh reflections, bringing back many happy memories.

I lived in Warriston Road, right on the Water of Leith (Puddiky)."

Boys' Brigade

"I was a member of the 46th Boys’ Brigade, under the leadership of Tom Curr where I was Drum Major of the pipe and bugle band.

I have many happy memories of the yearly visits to  Lilliesleaf, camping with the Boys' Brigade."

John Fraser, Australia:  January 26, 2012

 

Recollections

29.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Thank you to Allan Dodds for sending me these postcard portraits of his mother and father.  Both were members of Broughton Place Amateur Dramatic Society.

Allan wrote:

Broughton Place Church

Amateur Dramatic Society

My Father

"Here is a postcard portrait of my Father.  It bears the imprint of Crown Studios:

Photo

1.

Allan Dodds' Father, dressed in theatrical costume

Postcard portrait from 'The Crown Studio', Edinburgh  -  Allan Dodd's father dressed in theatrical costume

©  Reproduced with acknowledgement to Allan Dodds, Nottingham, England

I've absolutely no idea what the costume might represent but it may be that my Father appeared in a theatrical production of the day that was felt worth recording for posterity.

I think he looks quite dashing with his natural curls.  He would have been fifteen or sixteen years of age when the picture was taken.

In the 1940s and 1950s he was an active member of Broughton Place Church's Amateur Dramatic Society where he acted as 'Stage Lighting Manager' and my Mother acted as 'Producer'.

My Mother

"Here are three postcard portraits of my Mother.  All are  from the studio of Alec Roberts' at  Piershill, Portobello, where she lived.

Although only one is marked with Alec Roberts' name and address on the back, you can see that all three were taken in the same studio.  The painted backdrop is the same on them all!"

Photo

2.

Allan Dodds' Mother, on a seat in Alex Roberts' Studio  -  c.1914

Postcard Portrait from the studio of Alec Roberts, Piershill, Edinburgh  -  Allan Dodds' mother, photographed on a seat in the studio, around 1914

©  Reproduced with acknowledgement to Allan Dodds, Nottingham, England

Photo

3.

Allan Dodds' Mother, dressed in Girl Guide uniform  -  c.1921

Postcard Portrait from the studio of Alec Roberts, Piershill, Edinburgh  -  Allan Dodds' mother, photographed in girl guide uniform, around 1921

©  Reproduced with acknowledgement to Allan Dodds, Nottingham, England

Photo

4.

Allan Dodds' Mother, dressed in Welsh Outfit   -  c.1926

Postcard Portrait from the studio of Alec Roberts,Piershill, Edinburgh  -  Allan Dodds' mother, photographed in Welsh Outfit, around 1926

©  Reproduced with acknowledgement to Allan Dodds, Nottingham, England

"Life in those days was much more satisfying without television dictating one's cultural life.  Live performances were always fraught with the possibility of disaster, which in the event never materialised because my Mother insisted on proper rehearsals.

 Robert Kemp the Playwright lived just across the road in Warriston Crescent and my Mother always put on one of his one act plays, at least once a year.

We were immensely proud of the fact that the Kemp family lived in such close proximity in that beautiful Georgian street where I played every single day of my childhood life."

Warriston Crescent

"In my memoirs, I describe the feelings on visiting Warriston Crescent, forty years after having left the city."

Allan Dodds' Memoirs

"Laughin' on the Ither Side of My Face"

"Right now, I’m standing at the mouth of Warriston Crescent, looking down with Tanfield behind me.   Why, there’s Marjorie tucking her skirt up into her knickers so she can skip on the rope that the Johnson sisters are swinging. Someone’s asking me if I want to play peevers.

'Nae fear, I’m no’ a cissy', I retort.  Stuart Harrod’s already halfway up a tree, beckoning me to join him.  And there’s Arnold Kemp with a new bike that he’s not letting me have a go on, toerag that I am.

I’d better not tell him he’s going to die long before I do, but I’m tempted. At that moment Michaelina pokes her head up from the basement at Number Four. “Ye dirty wee bugger!” she shouts at me, as I watch the Store milk horse lift its tail to drop a stinking pile on the cobbles. That’ll keep the scaffies busy tomorrow.

And you should see the look of disbelief on Christina Kemp’s face when I tell her that I’m going to be a Writer, just like her father. Then, as quickly as they appeared, they’re gone; and as their voices die away I catch myself laughin, and not for the first time, on the ither side o’ ma face."

Extract from Allan Dodd's Memoirs:  "Laughin' on the Ither Side of My Face"

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  26 April + 8 May + 10 May  2013

 

Recollections

30.

Alex and Eileen Sinclair

Corstorphine, Edinburgh

Alex and  Eileen Sinclair wrote:

Powderhall Sprint

1900

"Alex's grandfather ran in the 1900 Powderhall Sprint and was awarded two ornamental-type vases for his efforts.

We still have the vases, but have not been able to find out anything about them.  Does anyone out there have any information about them?"

Alex and Eileen Sinclair, Corstorphine, Edinburgh:  July 11, 2013

Reply to Alex and  Eileen Sinclair?

If you know anything about the types of vases that were awarded for the Powderhall Sprints and would like to send a message to Alex and Eileen, please email me to let me know, then I'll pass on their email address to you

        -  Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  July 11, 2013

 

Recollections

31.

Alex and Eileen Sinclair

Corstorphine, Edinburgh

I asked  Alex and  Eileen Sinclair if they would be able to send me a photo of the vases that were awarded for the Powderhall Print in 1900.

Here is a copy of the photo that they sent.

Thank you to Alex and Eileen.

Powderhall Sprint Vases

1900

Powderhall Sprint, 1900  -  Vases

©  Alex and Eileen Sinclair, Corstorphine, Edinburgh:  July 12, 2013

Recollections

32.

Graham Simpson

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Graham Simpson, now living in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, left a message in the Edinphoto Guest Book about his memory of the 'blue sun' in Edinburgh around 1950.

Graham added:

Friends

"I remember some from Broughton School who have contributed to the EdinPhoto web site. 

I attended the school between 1946 and 1950.  I only lasted there until the end of 4th Year, but these names are familiar to me:

-  James Munro**

-  John Richardson.

-  Colin Campbell.

Was it James who was dux of the school, or was that Gerald 'somebody'?"

Tragic Accident

"I remember the sad case of 'Scottie' whose last name evades me.  Scott was climbing over a spiked iron railing, near the Water of Leith, locally known as the Puddicay, close to Glenogle Baths when he slipped and was severely impaled on the rusted spikes.

Although rushed to hospital, he died within the week of tetanus poisoning, then known as lockjaw'.

Why these somewhat evil and certainly dangerous railings  were allowed all over the city I will never know."

Amusing incident

"A less dangerous and more humorous incident that occurred during my time at Broughton also involved the Puddicay.

A gang of us would sometimes walk across Broughton Road during the lunch hour and go down the dirt road to the then huge landfill, then turn right along the high bank of the Water of Leith towards an iron railway bridge that crossed the river at the bank's lowest sides.

The bridge had a flat projection of approximately one foot at the bottom structure along which, if you were brave or stupid enough to use as a crossway with your back to the steel wall of the bridge, you could inch carefully to the other side.  We all tried this successfully at least once.

One of the gang, Leslie Dempster, challenged us to 'up the ante' by betting that he could actually swing himself like Tarzan across to the other side by hanging on to the iron ledge swing by swing.

Well, he failed miserably, plunged into the six feet of rushing, dirty, brown water (which was in spate) and, far too late, yelled that he could not swim!  Luckily we grabbed some long branches, extended them out to him and pulled him in before he was dragged away.

We got back to Broughton Road, scraped around for the fare and stuck him on a bus destined for home.  Nobody had telephones then or knew his address, except that it was somewhere in Royston.

He turned up a couple of  days later, quite healthy with a note from his mother.

Leslie was not in my class.  Does anyone remember him?

Graham Simpson, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, September 7, 2007

Recollections

33.

Ian Layton

Cedar Creek, Texas, USA

Thank you to Ian Layton for sending me the message below and also a message about Duncan's Chocolate Factory,

Powderhall Stadium

"Hi! I just came across your site and it brought back childhood memories to me.

My father, Jim Layton, was the Assistant Racing Manager at Powderhall Stadium from 1966-1969."

Ian Layton, Cedar Creek  Texas, USA

 

Recollections

34.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Thank you to Allan Dodds for writing again with more memories of Broughton.

Allan wrote:

Blind Man in Broughton Street

"I had a friend called Hugh Farquharson who was a totally blind Social Worker in Edinburgh in the 1950s.  As in London, with its fogs and smogs, blind people in Edinburgh would often be asked by sighted people to lead the way as sight was of little use in a 'pea souper' and sighted people could quite easily become lost.

Hugh told me a story about a blind man he knew who lived in Broughton Street. Every morning he would nip out to the nearby newsagent for cigarettes, navigating by sound and memory of the route.

One night, unknown to him, a roofing company had put up scaffolding all across the front of his tenement block.

The following morning the man took a few familiar paces along the pavement before colliding heavily with one of the poles.

 Dusting himself down, he proceeded a few more paces before hitting his head on another pole.

-  As he cursed aloud he heard a voice cry from the bus stop across the road: 'Just one more to go now!'."

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  May 1  2014

 

Recollections

35.

Anne Cunliffe (née Pip Watt)

Edinburgh

Thank you to Anne Cunliffe (née Pip Watt):

  for providing her class photo from East London Street School

London Road School Class  -  Around 1944 ©

-  and for writing about living in Broughton Street.

Anne wrote:

Around Broughton Street

Kindergarten

"As children we went to Barony Place Kindergarten."

Our House

"Our house in Broughton Street had a large room (Parlour).  Sometimes during the war, classes were taken there or in Cramond Place, for safety reasons.

Church

"On a Thursday , a few of the families who went to St Paul's & St George's Episcopalian Church on the corner of York Place and Broughton Street were called out to see Reverend Moore for a short lesson."

Play

"I have happy memories of Broughton Street, playing in the backgreens, and playing 'kick the can, etc. on the street."

Anne Cunliffe (née Pip Watt), Edinburgh:  March 16, 2014

 

Recollections

36.

Scott Rendall

Thank you to Scott Rendall who wrote:

Broughton Star

William Rendall

"I'm Scott Rendall.  My late father, William Rendall, resident of No.8  Coburg Street played for Broughton Star, many years ago.  He would have been 85 years old if alive now.

I'd love to know if anyone remembers him."

Scott Rendall:  December 24 2015

Reply to Scott Rendall?

If you remember William Rendall, and would like to send a message to Scott, please email me to let me know, then I'll pass on his email address to you

Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  24 December 2015

 

Recollections

37.

Ron Forbes

Majorca, Spain

Thank you to Ron Forbes who wrote:

Schools

"I lived in Drummond Place as a boy (until 25 actually!) and left in 1965. I attended Canonmills and Broughton schools."

Shops

"I remember being sent for messages to:

 Mr Thomson's newsagents

 the fishmongers next door in Dundonald Street for fish heads and scraggy bones for the cat

-   Mrs Rutherford's wee grocers opposite.

Going back to Edinburgh on visits is not the same, but at least the Cumberland Bar is still there to reminisce.

Around Scotland Street

"I remember, also, the bakers and grocers in Scotland Street with the sweetie shop opposite.  I forget the old lady's name, but her shop was just round from where Sir Compton McKenzie lived at 31 Drummond Place.

I also think about being treated to a sherbet poke from Mrs. Wight's sweetie shop in Cornwallis Place.

Scotland Street Lane was always busy with lorries going to and from Wightman's the egg merchants, and Geo. McCrae potato merchants. I sometimes got the chance to go down to East Lothian to get the potatoes.

Then there was Cowie's the chemist and Bootlands the baker at at the bottom of Dublin Street.  Further up the street was the Sunday school at the now vanished Baptist church.

I delivered milk from a little cart with House o' Muir Farm Dairy, corner of Albany Street, when I was 11. A lovely family called Walker owned it.

Return visit to Edinburgh

"Thirty years later, I visited my father in Edinburgh.  We brought him in a fish supper from my old favourite fab. Italian chippy in Broughton Street.  He said: "Son, this is the best fish & chips I've ever had."  When told him that I got it from the Italians, he said "I haven't been in there since the night Mussolini invaded Abyssinia" !!!

Fond memories!

Ron Forbes, Majorca, Spain:  28 December 2015.

  

Recollections

38.

Ron Forbes

Majorca, Spain

Thank you to Ron Forbes for writing again.

Ron wrote:

Scotland Street Lane (West)

John Wightman

Egg Merchant

"I remember John Wightman well.  Our house in Drummond Place had a back gate into Scotland Street Lane (West). 

As a boy in the late-1940s and early 1950s, I used to play football in the evenings against one of his garage doors, and he would come steaming down in his red Jag (I think) and give us a real telling off. 

He always had a very red face (to match the car).  His company  had about 4 garages there, and was a very busy business."

Geo. McCrae

Potato Merchant

Also in the lane was Geo. McCrae, Potato Merchants. I used to go, sometimes, in his lorry cab down to East Lothian to help bring back potatoes. 

Of course the old lane stables have probably all been made into flats now, but on a recent nostalgia visit to the lane, I saw the old 'John Wightman (Egg Merchants)' sign was still above the garage door.  Maybe he's still around.  That brought back good memories for me!

Ron Forbes (now aged 74), Majorca, Spain:  27 June 2016

 

__________________

 

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EdinPhoto - Home Page  Please send me an e-mail ...  with your questions, comments, suggestions or news.   At any time, you can search for a word  -  perhaps a photographer's name or a photographic topic.  The search will produce a list of pages on the EdinPhoto web site where this word appears.     At any time, you can search for a word  -  perhaps a photographer's name or a photographic topic.  The search will produce a list of pages on the EdinPhoto web site where this word appears.  

Photographs and Other Images  -  These include portraits of photographers  -  photographic outings -  Princes Street views  -  Newhaven Fishwives  -  etc.  Early Photography in Edinburgh  -  Talbot, Brewster, Hill & Adamson, Early Professional Photographers in Princes Street, etc.  Professional Photographers in Edinburgh  -  1840 to 1940  -  Their names, dates of business and studio addresses.  The Photographic Society of Scotland  -  1856 to 1873  -  Lectures, Exhibitions, Outings, etc.  The History of Edinburgh Photographic Society  -  1861 to date  -  Lectures, Exhibitions, Outings, Poems, etc.  EPS Publications - EPS Handwritten Records  -  Photographic Journals  -  Trade Directories  -  Books  -  etc.  Thanks to all who have encouraged and supported me in creating the EdinPhoto web site  -  including descendants of photographers  -  researchers  -  providers of photographs and other material  Background notes on the research thal led up to the creation of this site  -   together with lists of new material added to the site since its launch.  Brief comments on how this site might be used  -  Just browsing?  -  Seeking specific information?  Please add your questions, suggestions or other comments to the Guest Book.  Links to other web sites  -  Photographic Societies  -  Photographic History  -  Family History  -  etc.  Click here to find the link to the Edinburgh Photogrpahic Society web site.

 

A selection of my photographs, many from Edinburgh throughout the year.   Also photos from Scotland, London, Iceland, Italy, Hong Kong and elsewhere     Many old maps of Edinburgh (Old Town, New Town, while City), Leith and Newhaven.  Includes several old transport maps and a comparison of old maps with recent aerial photos.   Old engravings, mailly of Edinburgh scenes.  Some from the 1820s, some from the 1890s,  some others - includes many hand-coloured examples from the 1820s.   News from Edinburgh today  -  Events, Collections, Buildings and Gardens, Transport   This site includes     1. Post card portraits taken in studios in Edinburgh:    2. Post card views either takeen/published by Ediburgh photographers or views of Edinburgh, or both.y Edinburgh    Views of Edinburgh, grouped into three sections:     1. Street views:    2. Buildings:    3. Around Edinburgh   Views of transport around Edinburgh  -  Horse drawn trams and buses, cable cars, electric trams, buses and a few railway photos.  Also several maps of Edinburgh's bus and tram routes.   Links to pages with Photos of Groups   Frequently Asked Questions

  Summary of the updates added to this site each month since the site was launched   Links to Dumbiedykes pages  Link to Granton pages  Link to Leith pages   Link to Newhaven pages   Links to Portobello pages   Link to My Recent Talks