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Recollections  -  Edinburgh Old Town

Colinton

and

Bonaly

in the

1940s and Later

1.

George Smith

British Columbia, Canada

-  The Railway

-  The Barracks

2.

David Say

St Ives, NSW, Australia

-  Evacuation

-  Air Raid Sirens

-  Air Raid Patrol (ARP)

-  By Train to Glasgow

-  By Train to Edinburgh

-  Gas Masks

-  Dreghorn Loan

-  The Pentland Hills

-  The Railway Tunnel

-  Life went on ...

-  Holidays

-  The End of the War

-  Smallpox Death

-  By Train to London

3.

Valerie Turner

Esk, Queensland, Australia

-  Colinton

-  Australia

4.

Valerie Turner

Esk, Queensland, Australia

-  The Big Store

-  Wooden Horses

5.

Lynda Maine

Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

-  St Cuthbert's Store

-  Wooden Horses

-  Drum Horse

-  Edinburgh Tattoo

6.

Valerie Turner

Esk, Queensland, Australia

-  The Ice Cream Man

-  The Veg Man

-  The Fish Man

-  The Rag & Bone Man

7.

Valerie Turner

Esk, Queensland, Australia

-  Flowers

-  Woods

-  Old Castle

-  Return to Edinburgh

-  Potatoes

8.

Valerie Turner

Esk, Queensland, Australia

Air Raid Sirens

Gas Masks

Royal Navy

Trams

Local Shops

9.

Lynda Maine

Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

Deliveries

10.

Valerie Turner

Esk, Queensland, Australia

Spylaw Park

-  Trip to Fife

-  Fields behind our Houses

-  Soup

-  Sandra's Mum

-  Leaving Colinton

11.

Valerie Turner

Esk, Queensland, Australia

Rabbit

-  Leaves, Nuts and Berries

-  Dog Biscuits and Fish

-  Eggs

-  Christmas Cake

-  Rations

-  The Pigs' Bin

-  Milk Monitor

-  Apples

12.

Valerie Turner

Esk, Queensland, Australia

Garden Party

-  The Grass Steps

-  Braid Hills

13.

Valerie Turner

Esk, Queensland, Australia

School Doctor

-  School Dentist

14.

Bob Wyllie

Brussels, Belgium

Craiglockhart Road

-  Railway Question

15.

Bob Wyllie

Brussels, Belgium

-  Railway Question

16.

Brian Clapp

-  Redford Barracks Railway Answer 1

17.

Patrick Hutton

New Town, Edinburgh

-  Redford Barracks Railway Answer 2

18.

Douglas Beath

Tasmania, Australia

-  Redford Barracks Railway Answer 3

19.

Valerie Turner

Esk, Queensland, Australia

Spring

-  The Woods

-  Colinton Dell

-  Singing

20.

Sheila Stewart

Edinburgh

-  Woodhall Estate

21.

Alistair Rankine

Langwarrin, Victoria, Australia

-  Mobile Shops

22.

Edith Caulfield
(née Cavanagh)

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

-  Mobile Shops

23.

Rachel Carr

Redford Barracks

-  Parade through Edinburgh

24.

Lynda Maine

Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

Colinton Mains

Van Deliveries

-  The Store

25.

Alan Napier

Albany, Western Australia, Australia

Colinton Mains

-  Colinton Mains Drive

-  Hand Grenades

-  Anybody else from Colinton Mains?

26.

Lynda Maine

Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

Colinton Mains

The Napier Family

27.

Alan Napier

Albany, Western Australia, Australia

Colinton Mains

-  Relations

-  Doctor Morley

28.

Mike Cheyne

London

Colinton

29.

Jenny Neil
(
née Bayne)

Richardson Cousins

30.

Peter Hoffmann

Doctor Motley

Blog Spot

31.

Jenny Neil
(
née Bayne)

Neighbours

Shops

32.

Linda Powe
Windsor, Berkshire, England

Market Garden

32.

Reply 1

Tony Sutton
Crewe Toll, Edinburgh

The Didcock Brothers

33.

John Gordon
Easdale, Oban, Argyll & Bute, Scotland

Redford Barracks Railway

-  Open Space:  Late-1940s

-  Elliot Pk + Gdns:  World War II

-  The Line of Trees

-  Redford Barracks

34.

Karen Ann McKinna
Canada

Living in Colinton: 1975

35.

Gerry Frew

-  Mobile Shops

36.

Robert Edminson
Falkirk, Stirlingshire

-  Our House

-  Fields and Houses

-  Bonaly Farm Dairy

-  Transport

-  Flying

37.

Peter D Giles
Australia

-  Hospital and Nurses' Uniforms

-  Which Hospital?

38.

Peter D Giles
Australia

-  Nurses and Nuns

-  Hospital Found

Footpath to the Burn

-  Main Building and Annex

-  Name of the Hospital?

39

Les BRABY
Kent, England THEN
Borders, Scotland

-  Princess Margaret Rose Hospital

40.

Peter D Giles
Australia

-  Royal Edinburgh Hospital

41

Les BRABY
Kent, England THEN
Borders, Scotland

-  Hospital near Woodhall Road

-  The City Hospital

-  Convent

42

Allan DODDS
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

-  Which Hospital

43

Bob HENDERSON Burdiehouse, Edinburgh

-  Princes Margaret Rose Hospital

44.

Peter D Giles
Australia

-  Princess Margaret Rose Hospital

-  Hospital and Annex  that I remember

-  Princes Margaret Rose Annex

45

Allan DODDS
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

-  PMR Hospital

-  Colinton Hospital

46

Ian Taylor

-  Colinton Hospital

47

Donald Grant
Penicuik, Midlothian, Scotland

-  Mystery Hospital

48.

Peter D Giles
Australia

Princes Margaret Rose Hospital

-  Cots

-  Nurses' Uniforms

-  Records and Photos

49.

Les Braby
Borders, Scotland

-  Princes Margaret Rose Hospital

-  City Hospital

-  Woodfield Convent

50.

Ray Melville
Rosyth, Fife, Scotland

-  Princes Margaret Rose Hospital

51.

Kevin Kelly
Stafford, Staffordshire, England

-  Bonaly Tower

 

Recollections

1.

George Smith

Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

Thank you to George Smith, British Columbia, Canada, formerly from Edinburgh, for the following recollections.

George wrote:

The Railway

"The line through Slateford to Colinton and beyond is stated to have closed to passenger traffic in the 1940s/50s, yet I recollect going on a  Sunday School outing by train to (?) Spylaw Park (or wherever Scotts used to make their Porridge Oats).  The date escapes me though."

The Barracks

"While writing of the Colinton area, I notice that the Riding School at Redford Cavalry Barracks was due to be demolished after a lot of legal hassle about listing.

I remember it well and although my memories date after the cavalry was mechanised, I do remember seeing all the riders in it.

I remember, too, seeing mountain artillery walking their loaded  mules through the streets sometime during the war, so imagine they were among the last to use the barracks as cavalry. 

They arrived at the Gorgie market cattle sidings as far as I can remember.  My three uncles were 'Greys' who learnt to ride at Redford, I believe."

 

Recollections

2.

David Say

New South Wales, Australia

World War II

Thank you to David Say for the following recollections.  David was born in Dreghorn Loan, Colinton, Edinburgh, in 1939.  He now lives in St Ives, New South Wales, Australia.

David wrote:

Evacuation

"My mother, sister and I were evacuated very early in the war, when I was only four months old - to Cardiff, of all places.  Cardiff got bombed, Edinburgh didn't and we came back home again."

Air Raid Sirens

"Back in Colinton, I remember being taken down to sleep under the stone stairs as the planes flew over to bomb Glasgow.  The wail of the siren on the police hut at the top of the village was piercing, yet mournful."

Air Raid Patrol (ARP)

"My father was in the ARP by night, and Professor of Electrical Engineering by day and by evening.  Did he ever sleep?  I did not see much of him.  But I did find his stock of 'bombs', very loud fireworks used to simulate the sound of the real thing in evacuation exercises.  And, after the war,

 I won a few Dinky cars and trucks, also used in ARP exercises."

By Train to Glasgow

"We had friends in Glasgow and occasionally spent the day there before the bombers returned in the dark.  I loved the anti-aircraft balloons that I saw as we emerged from the subway, just like the one in a picture book I had been given. 

We went by train.  It was invariably slow and the carriages seldom had WCs.  I was lifted up to piddle out of the window."

By Train to Edinburgh

"Our car went off the road during the War, as there was no petrol.   Saturday shopping in town was often done by train to the Caledonian Station at the west end of Princess Street.  It was slow and it was dirty - but it was fun and always a treat preferred over tram or bus.

Gas Masks

"I had a gas mask with a Mickey Mouse face, which I wore in the village, as would a child today at Halloween.  The real thing, soldiers from Redford barracks wearing masks, ran past on training exercises.  I did not think I would like to do that."

Dreghorn Loan

"The railings outside our house in Dreghorn Loan were removed in 1941 to make armaments.  For me, a little boy, this was a dramatic ravaging of our property.  What would they take next?

Dreghorn Loan, Colinton

    A Hartmann postcard  -  Dreghorn Loan, Colinton ©

In the winter, we sledged down Dreghorn Loan.  There were hardly any vehicles to make it dangerous.  The milk horse frequently lost his footing and his dignity, finishing up on his bottom at the steep exit at the foot of the Loan.  The kids who had a ride on the cart had to get off first.

The Pentland Hills

"Venturing up into the Polo Fields above Dreghorn Loan and below the Pentlands was dangerous, forbidden and always a great adventure.  This was army training land.  Burnt-out tanks, boxes of ammunition and little unexploded shells made for intriguing afternoons."

On one occasion, we saw a spy in the woods, examining the barracks through binoculars.  One of us tore off to alert the police.  An overweight, over-aged bobby struggled back up to the hills with my friend.  He was not a happy chappie.  The spy turned out to be a well-know ornithologist.  He had permission to be there.  We didn't."

The Railway Tunnel

"The railway line ran through Colinton, beside the telegraph pole in this photograph of Colinton Dell:

W R & S Ltd photo from the early 1900s  -  Colinton Dell ©

The train tunnel started close to Colinton Station.  It was always a draw.  About 200 yards long, it was curved.  In the middle of the tunnel, we could see neither end.  Soot blackened, even on the brightest day we were in total darkness.

Cointon Station  -  When was this photo taken? ©

Before walking through the tunnel, we put an ear to the rail to check that no train was approaching.  Someone had been told about this safety procedure and also that, should we meet a train in the single-track tunnel, it was safer to lie between the rails rather than at their side. 

We declared that this was what we would do, each secretly deciding that he would chance it at the side rather than have the snorting monster drive over him.

In the event, we did neither.  On what was probably the last occasion that we ran the gauntlet, we heard the puff puff puff of an approaching train when we were in the middle of the tunnel.  It must have been stationery at Slateford Station when we listened for it.

We didn't try lying down, between or outside the rails.  We ran like Spitfires, stumbling on sleepers, the end of the tunnel enlarging oh so slowly as we made our escape.  When the engine, belching smoke, emerged about a minute later, we escaped retribution by hiding behind the station before bolting up Spylaw Bank Road."

Life went on ..

"Mr Hutchison from the newspaper shop continued to take photographs.  I see that I looked like a rather sweet little boy, not the sort to trespass in train tunnels and army ammunition dumps.

The fishwife came once or twice a week, bringing the freshest catch I have ever tasted anywhere.  She filleted it in our scullery.

There were walks in the Dell, a swing in Spylaw Park and the occasional trip to Whinrig for afternoon tea.  Why did the wind always whistle so eerily through the telegraph wires on that lonely road up from Balerno?

Holidays

"Armed with ration books, we had some short holidays.  Once in the Isle of Arran, where my father laboured on a farm, a submarine surfaced.  “Is it German?” we wondered.  Probably not. 

And in North Berwick, the beach was scattered with barbed wire and massive anti-tank concrete blocks.  Some blocks are still there along parts of that coast.

Smallpox Death

"In 1942, there was an outbreak of smallpox in Edinburgh.  Eight people died of the disease and another ten as a result of vaccination (encephalitis).  One was my sister, aged 14.  Her iron lung was turned off.  It was needed, understandably, for armed forces casualties.

Monica’s name was never to be mentioned again.  I was told she had ‘gone on a long holiday’, learning of her death from the boy next door. 

It was how people dealt with grief at that time – but my mother’s stiff upper lift still quivered at Monica’s name when she died in her 102nd year, 61 years later.  No grief counselling.  Just bottle up the emotion and hope that it only smoulders and doesn’t explode."

End of the War

"The end of the war came uncertainly.  I went to the church hall, used as a mess for the troops, asking the soldiers if it was over yet.  They didn't know.  Eventually the announcement came over the radio.

 The world returned slowly to normality, but as a child of the forties, I had no idea what normality was.  Adults excitedly welcomed back the banana.  I was disappointed.  It didn't seem to me to be like fruit as I knew it - mostly raspberries, strawberries, rhubarb, apples and gooseberries from the garden.  Lawns had been dug up to make room for fruit and vegetables.

It took years before sweets were de-rationed.  They then ran out completely and had to be rationed again for another 18 months or so.

By Train to London

"My first visit to London was in September 1945.  I saw what bombs could do.  Half the dining room in our hotel was trampolined off, having received a direct hit.

The train home was murder.  It took 15 hours and there was no food or water.  And it was packed with troops going on leave - or to be demobbed - one sailor getting in by being passed through the narrow flat window above the main window. 

Every visit to the loo - and there were many for a small boy - required three soldiers to move out first.

David Say, St Ives, New South Wales, Australia:  October 28, 2006

 

Recollections

3.

Valerie Turner

Queensland, Australia

Thank you to Val Turner, Queensland, Australia, formerly of Colinton, for sending these recollections of Edinburgh.

Val wrote:

Colinton

"I lived in Colinton Mains, Edinburgh and had a very happy childhood there,  playing in the woods, in the burn, and during summer, climbing the Pentland Hills and eating the blaeberries.  What wonderful times we had!!"

Schools and Gala

"I went to Craiglockhart school and then Tynecastle school.

Craiglockhart school

   Postcard by an unidentified publisher  -  Craiglockhart Primary School, Ashley Terrace, North Merchiston  -  Early 1900s ©

I was also the Gala Queen in Colinton Mains, a long time ago!!!!"

Library and Shops

"We used to walk to the library in Colinton, almost daily to change our books.  There were no TVs in those days.

I used to go the St Cuthbert's church and then we'd go down the steps to what was the little sweet /tobacconist shop and spend our pennies and talk to the owner who used to wear a sailor's peaked cap.  Then we'd walk to the dell.  It was so beautiful."

Australia

"I emigrated to Australia with my family in 1952.   I'm now a radio presenter here in Esk, Queensland, a tiny village  an hour and half from Brisbane. My radio is 95.9 Valley fm 'Your Voice in the Valley'."

Return  Visit to Edinburgh

"My husband and I came to edinburgh in 1975.  We looked for the little humpy stone bridge in Colinton Road, just down from the barracks.  It used to be a dear little bridge on a winding road, but we found a 4-lane highway.

When I stopped and asked a woman where my castle and the humpy bridge were, she told me that the castle had been blown up in a army exercise and that the burn had been re-routed.  The old bridge still stands there but the burn flows elsewhere.

I cried and cried. 'I should never have left' I said!!"

Valerie Turner, Esk, Queensland, Australia:  December 30 + 31, 2007

 

Recollections

4.

Val Turner

Queensland, Australia

Val Turner, Queensland, Australia wrote:

The Big Store

"Do you remember the big store where we got our rations, with the wooden floor? 

And remember the way they did the cash, putting the money into a ball thing and screwing it up and then send it racing along the ceiling to the person sitting in a little room, putting the change in and sending it back down to the counter again?  I used to be thrilled with it!!"

Wooden Horses

"Do you remember wooden horses in the woods, close to the barracks.  One was called Joe and the other, Frank.

What did they do with wooden horses?   I used to play on them with Sandra Goodall.  Sandra now lives in Canada."

Val Turner, Esk, Queensland, Australia:  January 3, 2008.

 

Recollections

5.

Lynda Maine

Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

Lynda Maine, Colinton, Edinburgh, replied:

St Cuthbert's Store

"I remember my mothers share number.  St Cuthbert's paid the divi out twice a year. I remember the police standing in the old St. Cuthbert's in Bread Street when they paid the divi out."

Wooden Horses

"I think that the wooden horses have now been taken down, owing the the Health and Safety Act."

Drum Horse

"I remember when the Queen came to Edinburgh. Much to my brother's annoyance I was allowed to take the old Drum Horse, Pompei in his stable at Redford Barracks.

I was even lifted onto the saddle. I was scared stiff, but I enjoyed being on the saddle and getting a ride on it.  Would you believe, my mother did not take a camera!"

Edinburgh Tattoo

"I remember getting into Redford Barracks and being chased, especially when they were practising for the Tattoo

Oh changed days now. I believe you can go and watch them practising at Redford Barracks now, but I believe you know have to pay."

Lynda Maine, Colinton Mains, Edinburgh:  January 3, 2008.

 

Recollections

6.

Val Turner

Australia

Here, Val Turner remembers some of the people who came past her house when she lived at Colinton.

Val writes:

The Ice Cream Man

"I remember the Italian ice-cream shop at Tollcross, and also the 'yellow' ice cream van that would come around.  We'd call him the the yellow ice-cream man!!"

George T Smith, British Columbia says:

The ice cream man might have been  'Boni'  (pronounced Bone eye), from Tollcross.

George T Smith, Nanaimo, Vancouver Island,
 British Columbia, Canada:  January 10, 2008

 

The Veg Man

"Johnie, the veg. man who used to drive round the houses.  My greatest wish was to sell veg. on his truck!! which I did!!

The Fish Man

"I remember the fish man coming round."

The Rag & Bone Man

"When the rag and bone man came round, we had nothing to give him.  Everyone else was given a goldfish in a jar.  I only had mum's old corsets!! and they didn't warrant a goldfish!!"

Val Turner, Esk, Queensland, Australia:  January 3, 2008.

   

Recollections

7.

Val Turner

Australia

Here are more memories of Colinton from Val Turner.

Val wrote:

Flowers

"On Mother's Day, my sister's and I would walk to White's farm and ask to buy a bunch of flowers for 6d.  They were usually white.  Perhaps that's why we called it White's farm! 

Now, I ask my children not to buy anything except flowers to go into the garden where I have my  'Mother's Day patch'."

Woods

"I'd play all day in the woods with my friend, Sandra Goodall.  We used to pick wild strawberries, raspberries and gooseberries and Mum would make a jar of jam.  She's save all the sugar to make the Christmas cake and jams.  I still never have sugar in my tea or coffee o this day!! Thanks Mum!!

I remember the daffodils and rhododendrons growing wild, and  the dog roses.  We'd pick the red hips, take them to the school to be made into rose hip syrup!!  Nothing was wasted in those days!!"

Old Castle

"We also used to play in the falling down old castle on Colinton Road.  I remember the 'bobbie' yelling for us to come down from the turret with all our toys and stuff.  We'd slide down the greasy pole to get into the grounds. wish I could do that now!!"

Return to Edinburgh

"Sandra Goodall flew over from Canada to spend a week with me recently.  We went back and we saw our beech trees, elms, oaks, and we both had tears in our eyes.  The bluebells were still in flower and it was a most wonderful time together."

Potatoes

"My older sister went to live on a farm for a couple of weeks to pick, by hand, the potato crop from the frozen ground as the men were all in the war.  She loved that time but said they all cried when trying  to pick the potatoes from ground covered in ice.  Hard times!! "

Val Turner, Esk, Queensland, Australia:  January 10, 2008.

 

Recollections

8.

Val Turner

Australia

Here, Val Turner writes about some of her wartime memories around Colinton.

Val writes:

Air Raid Sirens

"I remember the air-raid sirens on top of Firhill going off when we were waiting for the tram.  We heard the siren and we'd quietly walk across the road and wait for the 'all-clear'. There was no hysteria or rushing about, and no counselling!"

Gas Masks

"We had gas masks. My little sister had one that was supposed to look like Micky Mouse, I think.  I remember her screaming when we put her into it."

Royal Navy

"My father was in the British Navy, so was not often at home, and when he was, he was in the A.R.P.  I remember the sand bags stacked against the office of the A.R.P. - I think that's what it was - and at the convent at Firhill."

Trams

"We'd wait for our tram.  Nos. 9 and 10 would go to Colinton Village.  No. 27 would stop at Firhill.

At Christmas, we'd come home from the city, sitting upstairs in the tramcar, and count all the Christmas trees in house windows. It's all buses now."

Local Shops

"I  remember:

- beautiful buttery flaky bread rolls from a bakery just up from Craiglockhart School. my friend Isobel Little used to bring them for her lunch. and I'd be having school dinners !!ugh!!

- the sweet shop just down from the school, selling small bottles of Fanta and lovely sherbet in little paper bags. I just loved t he sherbet and still love lemon sherbet sweets!!

- the shops including a lovely cake shop at Happy Valley. These held some excitement for me.  What a daft kid I was!!"

Val wrote, later:

"I hear from Tony Ballard that he also remembers the lovely cake shop at Happy Valley My mum used to call me 'Happy Val' after 'Happy Valley'. "

 

Val Turner, Esk, Queensland, Australia:  January12, 2008 + February 23, 2008.

 

Recollections

9.

Lynda Maine

Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

Lynda Maine, Colinton, Edinburgh, added:

Deliveries

"I remember David Flett coming around Colinton Mains on a Tuesday and Saturday.  He retired and took over the running of his Father-in-Law's shop, Hill Lord, the pet shop in Bruntsfield.

I did hear that David went back home to somewhere in  the North of Scotland.  I can remember David's brother-in-law Johnny.

I also remember the fish mongerI think he was called Hunan."

Lynda Maine, Colinton Mains, Edinburgh:  January 21, 2008.

 

Recollections

10.

Val Turner

Australia

Here, Val Turner writes about some of her wartime memories around Colinton.

Val writes:

Spylaw Park

"I remember walking to Spylaw Park and playing on the swings. They are still there I could almost see us swinging away, with my sisters, having a great time and smelling the porridge oats!!

It was there that we used to watch 'Punch and Judy' shows under the monkey puzzle tree.  The tree is not there now.

When I returned to Spylaw Park, I was struck with the beauty of the place, and also Colinton Dell.  On the way there, we passed the beautiful old church.  We went into the grounds and wandered round the gravestones, mellowed with time passedso beautiful."

Trip to Fife

"Dad was on the Herring Fisheries Board.  He would be there to launch new fishing boats.  He took me to a navy submarine one day and we went into itI remember the terrible closeness and the oily? smell.

I remember, once, he took us to Fife (I think it was Fife).  The women in the tiny whitewashed cottage, wearing long skirts, were all crying.  So, looking back I can only imagine a terrible sea tragedy must have taken place but my sisters and I weren't told."

Fields behind our Houses

"Sandra (Canada) and I would take blankets into the fields behind our houses, throw ourselves and the blanket down in the wheat and make 'our houses' with many rooms all connecting.  Then we'd see the farmer, shouting to us kids to get out of his fields.  So unfair!!

The women in the fieldsalso had long skirts and kercheifs round their hair!!  We'd scramble up the sides of the lovely haystacks, and sit for hours on top, singing away  -   a song just made for us, or so we thought!!

'Lovely day on top of a load of hay'

Soup

"I remember when dad came home with a sheep's head for mum to make soup!!  We all screamed and ran from the kitchen, and it sat on the kitchen table, its eyes glowing in the dark!!"

Sandra's Mum

"Talking of soup, Sandra's mum would make soup and serve it to us.  We'd be sitting on the coal bunker in the sun, drinking soup from cups!!

Sandra's mum had such beautiful hats.  On Saturday afternoons, we'd go into her 'big room' and try on her hats and look in the mirror!!  She was a beautiful woman."

Leaving Colinton

"My daughter couldn't believe that we all actually left Colinton, but when my Dad came back from the war he'd been in Trinidad and the  West Indies, and we were still in our cold damp house.  He said he had to get his daughters to the sun!! and so here we all are (in Queensland, Australia)

But my sisters and I know where we'd rather be!!  And as for the sun, I could shoot it out of the sky!!"

Val Turner, Esk, Queensland, Australia:  January 26, 2008.

 

Recollections

11.

Val Turner

Australia

Val writes here about her memories of food when she lived as a child in Colinton, during World War II:

Food during World War II

Rabbit

"I remember that we used to keep rabbits.  One continually got away and raided all the veg. gardens in our neighbourhood.  So one of our neighbours suggested that he kill it Mum said 'Yes', and to our horror, we were expected to eat poor Blackie !!

It was awful, (not the rabbit!!) and we were crying but I think in the end the enticing aroma of carrots and dumplings in the rabbit stew won us over!! Fancy eating our pets!!  But as Mum said, 'There's a war on', and that phrase covered most things as I remember."

Leaves, Nuts and Berries

"We used to eat  almost anything. I remember Sandra and I poisoned ourselves in the woods eating some strange leaves.  We were sick for a long time.

Sandra had said, 'Do you like vinegar?' and, of course, I said I loved it. So she said, 'These are vinegar leaves.'  So we ate a whole bank of them, stalks and all.  We had the  nurse call round to us on her bike for days after.

We'd drink the white stuff from the dandelions, ugh!!, the beech nuts, and all the berries we'd find in the woods.  In fact, anything we could find."

Dog Biscuits and Fish

"Mum would buy dog biscuits for Towser in the shape of dog bones and we'd eat them too.  We loved them!!  And of course we ate boatloads of fish.  I remember the lovely big cod steaks we'd fry.  Delicious !!"

Eggs

"We always had vegetables, but not much in the way of meat (not forgetting poor Blackie!!).  And remember the powdered egg in packets? brown waxy packets with 2 crossed flags on the front.  I loved those eggs scrambled !!"

We eventually had hens in the garden for the eggs but we had to give up our ration of 1 egg a week so we could buy hen food instead.  We'd go over to the barracks for all the scraps for the hens so they were fed very well."

Christmas Cake

"Mum would queue up and buy dried fruit, hide it away in the sideboard and lock the doors, and we'd slide the upper drawer out, stretch our arms along the  space the drawer had left, dangle our hands and grab anything we could from the paper bags.  Poor Mum could never see how the bags were all half full when she came to bake the Christmas cake."

Rations

"As we never took sugar in our tea, Mum always had plenty of sugar to bargain with!!  

We loved it on ration day when we had our  butter ration.  We'd never had anything tasting like bread with real butter!!  The margarine used to taste of fish.  Horrible!  The bacon used to taste of fish also."

The Pigs' Bin

"The pigs' bin was at the end of our street, and in it would be everyone's kitchen rubbish, just for the pigs.  In the summer, the bin would smell horribly."

Milk Monitor

"At school, I was a 'milk monitor'.  My job was to prick all the milk bottles with a special long  thick nailI recall the sharp snap sound of the milk top being 'popped'."

Apples

I remember, at Christmas, the school would go out to a theatre or somewhere and we were all given a beautiful eating apple, wrapped in tissue paper!!  They were a gift from the people in Canada.

The whole theatre was filled with such a sweet fresh smell of apples, I can remember the thrill of it, even now.  You don't buy apples smelling like that these days, or we don't over here!!

 I think the show we saw was the orchestra playing 'Peter and the Wolf', showing us all the different instruments.  They also played 'The Thunder and Lightning Polka'.  It was thrilling. I loved it.  These memories are very sweet to me.

Val Turner, Esk, Queensland, Australia:  February 5, 2008.

 

Recollections

12.

Val Turner

Australia

Here are more memories from Val Turner, of the Colinton area around the time that World War II ended.

Val wrote:

Garden Party

"I remember the Colinton Association Garden Party.  My mum and dad were very active in that sort of thing.

The Grass Steps

"We used to walk over the Braid Hills, very close to home, and play on the grass steps which we thought were marvellous!!  I saw the 'Vagabond King'  there.  I was sitting on the grass steps with the burn between the stage and the steps.

 I went to find them when I was in Edinburgh and, to my horror, I found a very busy road going through now but the steps were still there  -  or was it my imagination?"

Braid Hills

"I recall going to the Braid hills with our usual gang, Sandra and my sister.  We had a bottle of lemonade but nothing to open it with, so we smashed it on a stone (crazy!!) and my hand was in the way and I still have the scar on my finger today.

Val Turner, Esk, Queensland, Australia:  February 8, 2008.

 

Recollections

13.

Val Turner

Australia

Val wrote:

School Doctor

"I remember the doctor visiting school, and everyone lining up for the injections, then wearing an arm band so that people would be wary of bumping you.   How silly!!   It made one the target of every school bully!!

And, remember the smallpox injections? -  lots of tiny scratches in a circle on the upper arm."

School Dentist

"A visit of the school dentist filled me with horror.  The address of the dentist  was 45 Lauriston Place.  How  could I forget that?

Val Turner, Esk, Queensland, Australia:  March 8, 2008.

 

Recollections

14.

Bob Wyllie

Brussels, Belgium

Thank you to Bob Wyllie who wrote asking a question.

Bob wrote:

Craiglockhart Road

"In 1953, I went to live in Craiglockhart Road, just down from Firhill.  Our house, which is clearly shown in this map

1940

    Edinburgh and Leith map, 1940 -  Juniper Green and Colinton section ©

but surprisingly not in this map

1955

    Edinburgh and Leith map, 1955  -  Juniper Green and Colinton ©

 was in a small  cul-de-sac off Craiglockhart Road, proper, and backed onto the garden wall of the Old Soldiers' Home.

We used to rise with the Reveille bugle from Redford Barracks, but did not necessarily retire to the Last Post which we also heard."

Craiglockhart Road (and the small cul-de-sac on the 1940 map) can be found towards the upper right corner of these two maps.  -  Peter Stubbs

Bob added:

Railway Question

"Between the back of our house and Elliot Rd: there was still then a cultivated field, but along its edge ran a long very narrow wood which backed houses until it merged with the woods of the dell towards its Slateford end.

My mother told me that this was the line of the old 'puggy' railway which had been used to bring dressed stone from the quarry (presumably Hailes) and via a short stretch of the Union Canal too, up for the construction of Redford Barracks.

My mother was not from the area,  but she knew a lot about old Colinton since she often visited it as a girl in the days just before the Great War when the construction of the barracks started.

Can anyone shed any light on this tale of the 'puggy' railway?"

Bob Wyllie, Brussels, Belgium:  August 25, 2008.

Answer?

If you'd like to send a reply to Bob, please email me then I'll pass on your message to him.

Thank you.    -  Peter Stubbs:  August 26, 2008

 

Recollections

15.

Bob Wyllie

Brussels, Belgium

Bob Wyllie later provided more information, below:

Bob wrote:

Railway Question

"I notice also from the 1940 map that the long, thin wood that I referred to is clearly shown like a hockey stick with the handle trending top right and the blade at bottom left just to the left of our cul-de-sac.

The handle section which crosses Craiglockhart Road appears to be heading up towards Wester Craiglockhart Hill just east of Firhill proper. This would certainly fit in with the idea of a small-gauge railway way-leave."

Please click on the small Redford map below to enlarge it, and to see the 'hockey stick' shape that Bob refers to, near the centre of the map. 

Redford Barracks can be seen in the lower centre of this map, with the Royal Soldiers' Home and the cul-de-sac that Bob refers to, immediately to the north of the Barracks.

Redford

    Edinburgh and Leith map, 1940  -  Redford ©

Bob added:

"By the time that I lived there, the upper section of the wood / way-leave had presumably been incorporated into the back gardens of the houses along its track.  Only the strip along the edge of the field between Craiglockhart Rd and Elliot Rd remained."

Bob Wyllie, Brussels, Belgium:  August 26, 2008.

 

Recollections

16.

Brian Clapp

Here, Brian Clapp replies to the question in 'Recollections 15' above:

Redford Barracks Railway

Answer - 1

Brian wrote:

Book

"In Donald Shaw's book 'The Balerno Branch' (Oakwood Press), this appears:

'All that was built was a tramway from Slateford up to the site of the barracks, along which the War Office carried materials until the works were complete in 1913.

This tramway, which crossed the Union Canal by a small bridge still in existence at the top of Allan Park Road (and over which a conduit now runs) then became disused.' "

The Balerno Branch (Donald Shaw) 1989

Brian added:

1912 Map

"Presumably there was some discussion at the time about making the route permanent.

    W&AK Johnston Post Office Directory Map, 1912-13, showing a proposed tramway line to Redford Barracks ©

This extract from W&AK Johnston's Post Office Plan of 1912-13 shows the proposed tramway running from top to bottom of this map, about 2/3 of the way across the map. 

The course of the proposed tramway, shown on the map, follows what is now Allan Park and Craiglockhart Road. It passes through the hockey-stick shaped wood mentioned by Bob Wyllie, and ends in front of Redford Barracks."

Brian Clapp:  August 27, 2008.

 

Recollections

17.

Patrick Hutton

New Town, Edinburgh

Patrick Hutton wrote:

Redford Barracks Railway

Answer - 2

Patrick wrote:

"I think:

-  the W & AK Johnson Post Office Directory map, 1912-13, that you put up yesterday shows the planned route of the tramway.

-  this map, taken from the Bartholemew Survey Atlas, 1912, displayed on the National Library of Scotland web site  shows the actual route.

The proposal, according to Donald Shaw's book ''The Balerno Branch' was for a passenger-carrying tram route, whereas the actual route seems to have been more of a builder's siding, as is mentioned in reminiscences on the Haymarket Scout Group web site.

The route is somewhat different at the Redford end between the two maps above.  In both cases, the route runs across the 'hockey stick' strip of land that Bob Wyllie mentions, rather than along it."

Patrick Hutton, New Town, Edinburgh:  August 28, 2008.

 

Recollections

18.

Douglas Beath

Tasmania, Australia

Douglas Beath wrote:

Redford Barracks Railway

Answer - 3

Patrick wrote:

"Hunter's 1964 book, 'Edinburgh's Transport', pp144-6  has no less than six paragraphs on this short-lived line.  Its history seems to have comprised more promotion, counter-promotion, and frustration  than operation.  The story even stretches from the Loan, Colinton via Angle Park Terrace to Fountainbridge.

Quoting selected phrases from the book gives the gist of what happened on the ground:

'1909 ... Colinton Tramways Company ... seeking powers ... through fields ... Craiglockhart and barracks site ... branch to Slateford ... temporary tracks for barracks contractor's two steam locos.'

'By 1913 no effective progress (on permanent line, standard gauge electric)'.

'Old formation .... remained ... until building developed.    Part became Craiglockhart Road ... other north to Slateford and canal bridge can still be seen ... as footpath to Allan Park Road.' "

Douglas Beath, Tasmania, Australia:  August 28, 2008

Hunter's Book

I also have a copy of the book that I believe Patrick refers to above.  Its title is: 'Edinburgh's Transport: The Early Years''. 

However, I cannot find any reference to the line to Redford Barracks in my copy, so perhaps my copy is a different edition of the book.

My copy was published by James Thin, Mercat Press, in 1992.

Peter Stubbs:  August 28, 2008.

 

Recollections

19.

Val Turner

Australia

Val wrote again about the time when she lived in Colinton.

Spring

"I was remembering, the other day, when my friends and I used to go into the woods to find the first buttercup of Spring, and to see the trees with their tiny new green leaves, and the large sticky buds of the Sycamore trees Simple pleasures!  It all seems so long ago  now."

The Woods

"The woods were a great place for us kids.  We dammed the burn up with large stones, and swam  in the Summer.  We swung across the burn on great ropes with knots for us to sit on, left by the soldiers, and scrambled up and over great rope ladders in the 'rope wood'  just down from the ' T Wood'.

We played in the tank, also left by the army.  I still remember the oily smell inside the tank, but we didn't mind the smell.  We played with our dolls and teddies in there and thought  how lucky we were to have a soldiers' tank to play in."

Colinton Dell

"The Braid Hills were another favourite place for us kids, running up and down the grass steps  -  and Colinton Dell was such a lovely place, full of  memories for me.

The sweet shop/tobacconist  is now a house.  I remember the stone  steps going down to the sweet shop and the old Church which, of course, is still there.  We visited it last year and its still all the same."

Singing

"We used to sing in the buses and trains when we went on a day trip to the sea-side.  Everyone sang at full tilt, ready for the day's outing.

I remember when we came to Australia, and had to travel for about 1 hr on the train to get into Melbourne where we worked, my sister and I would sit in 'our corner' and sing all the way, much to the shocked  expressions of our fellow passengers! They looked over the tops of their newspapers at us, and we soon realized that that wasn't the done thing.  We often laugh at ourselves now, thinking back to those early days."

Val Turner, Esk, Queensland, Australia:  May 9, 2008.

 

Recollections

20.

Sheila Stewart

Edinburgh

Thank you to Sheila Stewart for sending some recollections of Longstone.  In these recollections, Sheila mentioned that her grandfather, George Smith, as well as having a market garden at Longstone,  had been a gardener at Woodhall Estate,  Colinton.

Sheila added:

Woodhall Estate

"I'd love to hear if anyone has any memories of Woodhall Estate or of his market garden at Longstone."

Sheila Stewart, Edinburgh:  June 11, 2012

Reply to Sheila?

If you have any memories of Woodhall Estate at Colinton, or of market gardens in Longstone, and would like to send a message to Sheila, please email me, then I'll pass on your message to her.    Thank you.

Peter Stubbs:  Edinburgh,  June 11, 2012

 

Recollections

21.

Alistair Rankine

Langwarrin, Victoria, Australia

Thank you to Alistair for posting a message in the EdinPhoto Guestbook.

Alistair wrote:

Mobile Shops

"Does anyone remember the mobile shops from the late-1950s and early-1960s?  I used to drive the Martins Baker van starting at the bakery in Grove Street.

My round was Oxgangs, Colinton Mains and  Juniper Green.  It was great seeing all the housewives coming out to the van, a few asking for 'tick'.

I had great fun back then"

Alistair Rankine, Langwarrin, Victoria, Australia:
Message posted in Edinphoto Guest Book:  July 17, 2012

 

Recollections

22.

Edith Caulfield (née Cavanagh)

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Edith Caulfield replied to Alastair Rankine's comments above

Edith  wrote:

Mobile Shops

"My Mom, sister and I lived at No.9 Firrhill Loan.  It was a brand new housing complex at the time which would have been 1955/56.  I remember the vans coming around.

-  There was one that sold everything

-  There was a small 3-wheeled milk van.

-  There was also the bread van"

Edith Caulfield (née Cavanagh), Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Message posted in Edinphoto Guest Book:  July 17, 2012

 

Recollections

23.

Rachel Carr

Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England

Rachel Carr  wrote:

Redford Barracks

Parade through Edinburgh

"During a family meal my Great Uncle Vic Ballard mentioned the time when he lived in Edinburgh.

His father, Frederick Ballard was stationed at Redford Barracks and was the camp Colour Sergeant.  It was his responsibility to co-ordinate a parade through Edinburgh. The parade was to boost morale and Montgomery was the head of the parade"

Question

"Does anyone recollect this parade, and are there are any photos of it?"

Rachel Carr, Gloucester, Gloucestershire, England:  July 21, 2012

 

Recollections

24.

Lynda Maine

Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

After reading about Alistair Rankine's van deliveries in Recollections 21 above, Lynda Maine, replied:

Van Deliveries

"I can remember some of the vans coming around Colinton Mains:

-  David Flett and his brother- in law, Johnny, selling vegetables

-  St. Cuthberts groceries van that came around on a Friday.

-  St. Cuthberts Milk Float with the horse

Edinburgh and Dumfries milk float.

-  Hunnan the fishmonger.

-  McVitties, coming around Colinton Mans selling bread, cakes, biscuits etc.  (When I was much younger my dream wish was to go out and buy from McVitties one of their creamiest cream buns and sink my teeth into it.  Now, the thought gives me the shudders."

The Store

"I remember St. Cuthbert's opening their self-service store in Oxgangs Road North, across from their old storeI thought this was the height of fashion, but nowadays they are 'ten a penny'.

I also thought it was great to go around the shop and see things that you wanted without a shop assistant getting them for you.

Changed days!"

Lynda Maine, Colinton Mains, EdinburghJuly 24, 2012.

 

Recollections

25.

Alan Napier

Albany, Western Australia

Thank you to Alan Napier, Albany, Western Australia for posting a message in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

Alan wrote:

Colinton Mains Drive

"I lived in Colinton Mains Drive from 1940 until 1952.  I used to play with my friends up near Dreghorn barracks where the Yanks were stationed."

Hand Grenades

"One day we found a box of hand grenades, and then I brought a few home wrapped in my jumper. I showed my mother who nearly fainted.  She then told me to take them next door to where an Air Raid Warden lived.  I showed the hand grenades to the warden who just said "Oh my God!" and slammed his door shut.

A few minutes later, there was the sound of police bells and and Army Police arriving at my house.  It was all quite exciting at the time, especially being nine years old!"

Anybody else from Colinton Mains?

"I'd love to hear from anybody who lived in Colinton Mains during the war time."

Alan Napier, Albany, Western Australia (formerly Captain's Road, Edinburgh)
Message and email address posted in EdinPhoto guestbook: January 2, 2012

Reply to Alan Napier?

If you'd like to send a reply to Alan, you'll find his email address at the end of the message that he posted on January 2, 2012 in the EdinPhoto guestbook, or else you can email me and I'll give you his email address.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  January 2, 2013

 

Recollections

26.

Lynda Maine

Colinton Mains, Edinburgh

After reading Alan Napier's 'Recollections 25' above, Lynda Maine wrote:

The Napier Family

"My next door neighbour, when I lived in Colinton Mains Road, had two boys, Alistair and Ian Napier.  It would be a small world if they were related to Alan Napier who wrote 'Recollections 25 above."

Lynda Maine, Colinton Mains, Edinburgh
Message and email address posted in EdinPhoto guestbook: January 2, 2013

Awaiting a Reply from Alan

Thank you for your comments above, Lynda.  I've now sent an email to Alan Napier to to tell him about your message.

If he replies telling me that he is related to the Alistair and Ian Napier that you mention, I'll let you know.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  January 10, 2013

 

Recollections

27.

Alan Napier

Albany, Western Australia

Thank you to Alan Napier, Albany, Western Australia for contacting me again.

Alan wrote:

Relations

"I'm enjoying the new found contacts about Edinburgh.  In regard to having any Napier relations in Colinton Mains Road, unfortunately there is no connection.

I did have cousins who lived at 295 (I think) Colinton Mains Road.

They were Myra, Catherine, Anne and Ralph Richardson."

Doctor Morley**

"I also remember Dr Morley** who lived and practised on Colinton Mains Road. He was a black Ugandan, with the nicest attitude that I can remember, and spoke better English than what we did.

His wife was a very lovely white lady, who had been a nurse at one time. It was so unusual at that time to have such a contrast, but everybody loved the service he provided.

I'd love to hear from Lynda, if possible, to share some memories."

Alan Napier, Albany, Western Australia:  January 13, 2012

**  In fact, it appears that the doctor's name was Motley.  See 'Recollections 29' below.

I've passed on Linda's email address to Alan, so I hope they will be able to share their memories.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  January 14, 2013

 

Recollections

28.

Mike Cheyne

London

Thank you to Mike Cheyne who wrote:

Colinton Rod Barracks

    Redford Cavalry Barracks  -  2013 ©

    Redford Infantry Barracks  -  2013 ©

"I heard an interesting anecdote many years ago from my grandfather regarding the barracks in Colinton Road.

Allegedly they got the plans mixed up.  The barracks that were built in Edinburgh were supposed to have been built in India, hence the tiled floors and generally draughty corridors.

Whether apocryphal or not, it makes a good story!"

Mike Cheyne, London (born Edinburgh):  Message posted in EdinPhoto Guestbook, March 8, 2013

 

Recollections

29.

Jenny Neil (née Bayne)

Thank you to Jenny Neil who wrote:

Richardson Cousins

The Richardson Cousins, mentioned by Alan Napier, in his Recollections 27 above, lived across the road from my family in Colinton Mains Road and I believe Ann still lives in Edinburgh.

Jenny Neil (née Bayne), April 19, 2013

 

Recollections

30.

Peter Hoffmann

Highlands, Scotland

Thank you to Peter Hoffmann who has just read the comments about Dr Morley sent by Alan Napier above, and posted this reply in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

Peter wrote:

Doctor Morley

"Hi Alan:

I noticed your comment about the Ugandan Dr Motley in 'Recollections 27' above.  In fact,  his story is much more interesting. 

See this Colinton, Dr Motley BlogSpot. web page."

Peter Hoffmann, Highlands, Scotland:  reply posted in EdinPhoto Guestbook on March 13, 2013
in response to a message posted in the EdinPhoto Guestbook by Alan Napier on January 2, 2013.

BlogSpot

Thank you Peter.  You have a lot of information in your BlogSpot.  It was good to see the photos of Dr Motley as well.

I've now sent an email to Alan Napier in Australia to let him know about your  message about Dr Motley that you posted in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  March 13, 2012

 

Recollections

31.

Jenny Neil (née Bayne)

Thank you to Jenny Neil (née Bayne) who wrote:

Neighbours

"The Richardson Cousins, mentioned by Alan Napier in his 'Recollections 27' above lived across the road from my family in Colinton Mains RoadI believe that Ann still lives in Edinburgh.

I've recently been in touch with Lynda Mine who has contributed a lot to the EdinPhoto web site.  She also lived across the road from us."

Shops

"It was my father-in-law who owned Neil's butcher shop in Colinton Mains.  He also owned the grocery store next to it."

Jenny Neil (née Bayne):  April 19, 2013

 

Recollections

32.

Linda Powe

Windsor, Berkshire, England

Linda Powe who is trying to discover more about her family, wrote:

Question

Colinton

Market Garden

"In my childhood, in the 1950s, I spent most summers picking gooseberries at my a market garden in Colinton owned by my Aunt and Uncle, Jean and Robert Jeffries.

Sadly, I have had no contact with Jean and Robert or with other members of the larger family for many years.  I'd love to know what happened Jean and Robert, and to learn about their offspring."

Linda Powe, Windsor, Berkshire, England:  October 24+25, 2013

Reply to Linda?

Linda also wrote about her Uncles, the Didcock Brothers, who owned a furniture mill at Gorgie.

If you know anything about the market garden, the furniture mill, or any members of Linda's family  and would like to contact Linda, please email me, then I'll pass on her email address to you.

Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  October 24, 2013

 

Recollections

32.

Reply

1.

Tony Sutton

Crewe Toll, Edinburgh

Thank you to Tony Sutton for replying to Linda Powe's request for information about the Didcock Brothers.

The Didcock Brothers

20 Years ago

"My wife lived at 40 Balgreen Road and one of the Didcock brothers lived across the street from her, around 20 years ago.

Today

"Here is a link that I found giving information on the Didcock Brothers' Company today.  The company is based in Gorgie Road.

Tony Sutton, Crewe Toll, Edinburgh:  May 22, 2014

 

Recollections

33.

John Gordon

Easdale, Oban, Argyll & Bute, Scotland

Thank you to John Gordon for writing in response to the message left by Bob Wyllie in his Recollections 14 above.

John wrote

Open Space
Late-
1940s

"When I was growing up in Craiglockhart Grove (built in the late 1930s) from the early 1940s, the area bounded by Craiglockhart Road, Old Soldiers Home, Elliot Road, Elliot Park and the line of trees (part of the gardens of houses in Craiglockhart Grove) was an open space.

The entrance to this space was close to the cul-de-sac mentioned. A wide path ran across to a large gate on Elliot Road which was always closed.

The area between this path and the Home was occupied by an allotment association which also extended as a narrow strip alongside Elliot Park."

Elliot Park and Elliot Gardens
World War II

"The remaining area bounded by the track, Craiglockhart Road and the line of trees was waste land.  I recall my mother telling me that before the war it was a playing field for the school of the Convent of the Sacred Heart, now part of Napier University.

During the war it was ploughed for agricultural use. The whole area is now occupied by the houses of Elliot Park and Elliot Gardens."

The Line of Trees

"The line of trees bounding this field is within the gardens of the houses of Craiglockhart Grove. This narrow strip of trees begins at Colinton Road opposite the water tanks at Firhill and runs down to Craiglockhart Drive South

Part way down Craiglockhart Grove a stream emerges and flows into the stream running alongside the Craiglockhart Drive South which then enters Craiglockart Dell and into the Water of Leith.

We were led to believe that the stream was, at least in part, the overflow from the water works. I recall as a child digging for the pipe with no success!"

Redford Barracks

"Reveille and the Last Post from Redford Barracks were also regular sounds of my childhood.

Watching the rehearsals for the tattoo through the railings was a big attraction.  Sometimes, we were lucky and invited in to sit on the grass mounds covering the air raid shelters around the parade ground."

John Gordon, Easdale, Oban, Argyll & Bute, Scotland:  November 24, 2013

 

Recollections

34.

Karen Ann McKinna

Canada

Thank you to Karen Ann McKinna who wrote:

Living in Colinton

1975

"I am enjoying reading the recollections and seeing the photos of Colinton.  I lived there just for a year 1975, in a flat at 36 Bridge Road.

I was expecting our child and walked in the Dell daily as well as picking rosehips which I made into rosehip syrup with Pentland honey.

The people in the village were very friendly and kind and I have a lovely sense of ‘community’ that was there. I wouldn’t mind retiring there if it is still as friendly and beautiful."

Karen Ann McKinna, Canada: January 27, 2014

 

Recollections

35.

Gerry Frew

Thank you to Gerry Frew who wrote:

1960s

Living in Colinton

"I was born in October 1958, and grew up in Colinton Mains.  I had maternal grandparents in Whitson and paternal grand-parents in Carrick Knowe.

I lived with my Dad’s parents until I was about age 2, by which time Mum and Dad could afford their own house."

Mobile Shop

T Frew

Fruit & Vegetables

"In some of the recollections above, there is mention of mobile shops that were common at the time.

My grandfather, Thomas Frew (known as Tom or Tommy) ran a fruit and veg business from a van which primarily covered the Carrick Knowe, Stenhouse, Broomhouse, Corstorphine, Clermiston areas but he occasionally ventured as far south as our place.

His van was emblazoned with the words 'T Frew, Fruit & Vegetables' or similar.  I wonder if anyone remembers Tom and his van.

I used to go out on his van with him up till I was about age 10 or 11 and would carry ladies’ shopping bags (usually loaded with the obligatory 'forpit' of potatoes – I have no idea what that quantity means, only that it seemed to me to weigh a ton. Perhaps someone can enlighten me**.  

**  'Forpit'  is  discussed here on the EdinPhoto web site.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  October 19, 2014

I hoped to get a few pennies as a tip for my efforts but unfortunately, was disappointed more often than not."

Gerry Frew:  October 9+20, 2014

Reply to Gerry Frew

If you remember Tommy Frew and his van, or have any other memories that you'd like to pass on to Gerry, please email me to let me know, then I'll give you his email address.

Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  October 20, 2014.

 

Recollections

36.

Robert Edminson

Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland

Thank you to Robert Edminson who wrote:

Our House

"As a child, I lived in Colinton from 1953 to 1961.  This photo is of Munro Drive, about 1956. In the photo below, our house was the second bungalow on the south side of Munro Drive."

©  Reproduced with acknowledgement to Robert Edminson.  Robert tells me that this photo comes from his
 father's collection, and that the photo was probably  taken either by his late father or by the late George Robb

Fields and Houses

"I can remember playing in the fields to the south of Munro Drive which have now been built over.  I saw a number of houses built in Munro Drive and the start of the building in Bonaly Terrace, Grove, Gardens, and Avenue. We used to raid the building sites for wood to build model ships and 'guiders'."

Bonaly Farm Dairy

"I can also remember Mr Blake the farmer who ran the dairy at Bonaly Farm and used to bring his cows along Munro Drive back to the farm for milking.

Eventually the residents made a fuss about all the 'muck' and he put in a track just to the south of our garden along the edge of one of his fields and they went to and from the dairy along it. The heard had one Jersey cow called Caroline."

Transport

"In the school holidays the postman would give a gang of us, about 4 or 5 children, a lift away up past Torphin Reservoir and up to Bonaly castle.

We also used to get a ride in the Scottish Rural Gas pick-up truck when it delivered to our house."

Flying

"In those days, my father was keen on flying and was a member of the Edinburgh Flying Club.***

Robert Edminson, Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland:  Nov 17 (email) + Dec 18 (2 emails), 2014  (

***  Please see Robert's recollections of Edinburgh Airport and Air Raids.

 

Recollections

37.

Peter D Giles

Australia

Peter D Giles wrote:

Hospital and Nurses' Uniforms

"I was wondering if you could shed some light on what used to be a hospital in the 1960s, in the Woodhall Road in the Colinton area where the nurses, for want of a better description used to be called 'butterfly nurses' due to there very large and somewhat butterfly head dress.  The nurses' uniforms were reddish and white.

The hospital was not far from the Old Good Shepherd Convent at Woodhall Road at Colinton Edinburgh There was a main hospital building and an Annex."

Which Hospital?

"I'd like to discover more about this hospital because I was in the Annex with my twin sister, but we cannot remember the hospital's name.  Looking on Google Earth and on the Internet, I've not been able to find any reference to a hospital in that area.   Do you know of this place?"

Peter D Giles, Australia:  31 January 2016

Reply to Peter?

Unfortunately, l don't know the answer to the question that Peter asks.  Colinton is not a part of the city that I'm very familiar with.  Perhaps somebody with a better knowledge of the history of Colinton will be able to provide the answer.

If you have any information that you'd like to pass on to Peter, please email me to let me know, then I'll give you Peter's email address so that you will be able to send your message direct to him.

Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  6 February 2016

 

Recollections

38.

Peter D Giles

Australia

Thank you to Peter D Giles for writing again.

Peter added:

Nurses and Nuns

"As well as the nurses at the hospital, there was also some nuns, and yes it was there a fare few years ago now going back to the 1980.

I did, at one stage, find the hospital on Google Earth.  It was not far from the then Good Shepherd Convent at Woodhall Road, Colinton.

Hospital Found

"Looking around Colinton now, I think I have found what is left of the old hospital, but it is now out of sight now with all the new building having taken place over the years.

I remember the road off to the hospital was on the right hand side as you headed down Woodhall Road,  just before you got to the bend approaching the village traffic lights."

Footpath to the Burn

"I also remember a footpath that ran from Bridge Road, where you walked down from Hartwell’s, which had a bakery in the basement and a shop/café at street level.  This footpath had a  small stone wall, railing fence and a tree-lined pathway through the woods on the left, looking down into the burn that ran under the bridge."

Main Building and Annex

"I remember the hospital as a very large red brick building with many levels, and white window sills.  It had some beautiful grounds.

We were in the Annex, away from the main building.  The Annex was like a half-moon house, as you see in the old 1950 army tanning camp huts.  It had a high stone wall and wooden doorway, covered in a vine, which opened onto a roundabout with other houses around it.

Name of the Hospital?

"I'd like to know what was the name of this hospital.  Being so very young, my twin sister and I did not know its name.  We were both put into care at the Good Shepherd Convent at Woodhall Road.

Peter D Giles, Australia:  7 February 2016

 

Recollections

39.

Les Braby

Borders, Scotland

Thank you to Les Braby for responding to the question asked by Peter D Giles in his Recollections 37 and 38 above.

Les wrote:

Princess Margaret Rose Hospital?

"The name of the hospital that Peter Giles asks about, near Colinton, was the Princess Margaret Rose. It was an Orthopaedic Hospital, but I believe that it started out as a TB Treatment hospital.

In fact it was just past the Fairmilehead Junction and technically not in Colinton at all.

I had the misfortune to spend a few weeks there with a slipped disc in 1974/75.  I lived in Colinton Mains Crescent then.

I don't remember any Nuns or a Convent nearby, but that's not to say there wasn't one."

Les Braby, Borders, Scotland:  7 February, 2016 (2 emails)

 

Recollections

40.

Peter D Giles

Australia

Peter D Giles for writing again, adding:

Royal Edinburgh Hospital?

"I sure hope that the distances that I gave to and from the hospital are correct. I'm sure that the details that I gave about the Good Shepherd Convent at Woodhall Road at Colinton are correct.

The only other thing I was thinking is that perhaps the hospital was the Royal Edinburgh Hospital.  That's far away from Colinton, but still some of the old pictures that I've just been looking at do strike a cord.  So I've now written to that hospital.

There cannot be too many hospitals that would have had an Annex building at the back of the grounds that looked like old 1950 army training camp huts.  My memory of those huts is crystal clear, as there were other children in those wards as well.

Peter D Giles, Australia:  7 February 2016

 

Recollections

41.

Les Braby

Borders, Scotland

Thank you to Les Braby who wrote

Hospital near Woodhall Road?

"Further to Peter Giles comments above, the PMR hospital was on the north side of Frogston Road West, about half a mile east of the Fairmilehead Junction.

Woodall Road starts where the road divides at Colinton Village. Heading to the west from the junction at Colinton:
   -  the right hand road, Bridge Road, goes down to Spylaw Park.
   -  the left hand road, Woodhall Road, goes to Juniper Green..

There was no hospital there, to my knowledge, but it's a big area and it's possible, if not likely, there was a Convent there."

The City Hospital

"The only other hospital that I know of in the vicinity of Colinton Mains/Oxgangs was the City Hospital at the eastern end of the Braid Hills. You could walk from there to Colinton Mains in about 30 minutes as there was a footpath, now sadly closed and all houses."

Convent

"Has Peter googled convents and nunneries in the Colinton Area?  Perhaps the RC Bishop in Edinburgh, he might be able to give him give him some information.  Peter could try emailing him and asking him.  Sorry I can't be of more help, always willing though.

Les Braby, Borders, Scotland:  9 February 2016 (1st email)

Les  sent another email, adding:

Convent

"I've just googled Convent and Woodhall Road and found that there is still a convent  just off Woodhall Road.  So get Peter to do the same."

Les Braby, Borders, Scotland:  9 February 2016 (2nd email)

Convent

This is the result that I got when I googled as Les suggests above.  This page also includes  map showing the location of the convent:

Woodhall Road - Convent of the Good Shepherd

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  9 February 2016 (2nd email)

 

Recollections

42.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Thank you to Allan Dodds who wrote

Which Hospital?

"I'm afraid I don't know the name of the hospital referred to at Colinton, but it certainly wasn't the Princess Margaret Rose which was situated on Frogstone Road at Fairmilehead.

Nor was it Royal Edinburgh Hospital which is located in Morningside Place.

Perhaps a visit to the Lothian Region Health Archive could solve the problem, unless, of course, it was a private or Roman Catholic hospital."

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  9 February, 2016

Recollections

43.

Bob Henderson

Burdiehouse, Edinburgh

Thank you to Bob Henderson who wrote:

Princes Margaret Rose Hospital

"One hospital which seems to fit the bill for me is the Princess Margaret Rose. When I worked there in the late-1950s/early-1960s, it was a children's hospital. It had several army style huts built during the war when it was used by the services.

These were not Nissan huts, but were long with pitched roofs. At the time I was there these huts were used to house kids with deformities caused by thalidomide given to their mums during pregnancy. These kids were amazing!

The huts were built on stepped, sloping ground and when the children were allowed outside for fresh air they would escape by rolling down the slopes. It was fun to watch the nurses chasing them and the kids really enjoying the experience."

Bob Henderson, Burdiehouse, Edinburgh:  8 February, 2016.

 

Recollections

44.

Peter D Giles

Australia

Further Messages from Peter Giles

Within  Within a few days of posting his Recollections 37 and 38 above in February this year, Peter had received several replies.  See Recollections 39 and later.

Peter has also written to Lothian Health Board for information and is awaiting a response from them.  If I hear anything relevant  from him on that topic, I'll add it to this page.

Peter wrote again to me on 10 February 2016, sending me  three emails and enclosing Google maps of Colinton and Fairmilehead.  Unfortunately, it has taken me until now to find the time to add his comments from those emails to this page. 

Below is a summary of the points made by Peter in his emails of 10 February.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  13 April 2016

Princes Margaret Rose Hospital

"Looking at things from the air now, on Google Earth Maps, how it all seems to have changed!

The Princes Margaret Rose Hospital, before it was demolished, was on the north side of Frogstone Road West, near to where the A702 (Edinburgh-Biggar road) crosses the B701.  That's just over a mile to the east of Colinton

To me, that's a long way away from the places that i remember at Colinton:

-  The Good Shepherd Convent .

Harwell's bakery

-  Woodhall Road and the woods at Colinton

Hospital and Annex
that I remember

"I'm still having problems in finding photos of the hospital that I remember and the annex at the back or the side of it.

I don't remember exactly where the annex was, but I remember that there was side door that led on to a roundabout and  a narrow entrance into the main hospital but perhaps this was a back entrance."

Princes Margaret Rose Annex

"It would be nice, as well,  to see a few pictures of the annex that Les Braby said was part of the Princes Margaret Rose Hospital. I'm  sure someone must have some pictures of the place.

It's odd when so much history is washed away due to people not caring about what's around them, and  owners and the authorities not taking 'before' and 'after' pictures when they change something."

Peter D Giles, Australia:  10 February 2016

 

Recollections

45.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Thank you to Allan Dodds for writing again.

Allan wrote:

PMR Hospital

"I think that the annexes referred to by Les Braby were the huts that eventually became Wards 11 and 12, housing geriatric patients.  Although PMR was primarily a children's hospital it also specialised in adult orthopaedic surgery and pioneered hip replacement operations in the 1960s.

The Lothian Region Health Archive at the University of Edinburgh George Square Library has a huge collection of images from the PMR, including medical and  architectural photographs."

Alan Dodds used to work at PMR Hospital.
Please see his message below, sent earlier this year.

Alan wrote:

PMR Hospital

A Brief History

The Name

"You've just jogged my memory of the Princess Margaret Rose Orthopaedic Hospital.

It opened in 1932, named The Edinburgh Hospital for Crippled Children.  It was re-named in 1934 as the Princess Margaret Rose Hospital for Children after the birth of Princess Margaret, and renamed again in the 1950s.

In 1965 HRH visited the hospital at the official opening of the New Clinical Research Unit and I was the official photographer on the day."

The Building

"The building was designed by Mr James Morris of Morris & Steedman, Architects and it was state of the art.

I worked as Head of Department of Medical Photography and had a photographic studio and darkroom as well as being in charge of the Lecture Room where educational meetings took place."

 

Closure

"When the hospital closed in 2000, it was sold to a developer who demolished the new building in spite of the fact that it had become listed by then.

The only extant image of it can be viewed at 'The Rubble Club' website.  The site is now a private residential estate."

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  10 February, 2016

 

Colinton Hospital

"The hospital referred to at Colinton was certainly not the PMR and I suspect that from the description of the nurses' headdress it was a Catholic hospital."

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  16 April, 2016

 

Recollections

46.

Ian Taylor

South Glasgow, Scotland

Thank you to Ian Taylor for responding to the comments by Peter Giles, beginning with his Recollections 37 above.

Ian wrote:

Colinton Hospital

"The Woodfield Convent had an infirmary wing added in the mid-1930s, and later a byre and then a large annex

Perhaps, Peter and his sister were there, as he does state that they were put into the care of the nuns at the convent. His description of the ‘nurses’ head-dresses could apply to nuns."

Ian Taylor, South Glasgow, Scotland:  22 March 2016

 

Recollections

47.

Donald Grant

Penicuik, Midlothian, Scotland

Thank you to Ian Taylor for also responding to the comments by Peter Giles, beginning with his Recollections 37 above.

Ian wrote:

'Mystery Hospital'

City Hos0ital

"I’ve been reading the latest updates regarding Peter Giles’ mystery hospital and I’ve come to the conclusion that he is mistaken regarding it’s location near Woodhall Road.

From the information given, there really is only one candidate, that being the old City Hospital in Greenbank Drive.  It is close to the Colinton area and as was mentioned in a comment it used to be possible to walk through a lane to the Colinton Mains area."

Colinton Road Convent

"What has been missed by correspondents is it’s reasonably close proximity to what I believe was a former convent on Colinton Road that now forms part of Napier University.

Prior to being part of Napier University, it was known as the Craiglockhart College of Education a teacher training college for teachers in Roman Catholic schools, and before that Craiglockhart Military Hospital."

City Hospital Buildings

"The main reception building of the City Hospital still exists and is faced with red stone rather than red brick and the now demolished buildings were of similar material.

It originally opened in 1903 as the Colinton Mains Fever Hospital. One thing that would help enormously would be if Peter can enlighten us as to why he and his sister were in hospital.

I know for sure that in the 1980s, the period Peter mentions, that the City Hospital was the main facility for carrying out 'Ear, Nose and Throat' surgery.  So if for instance Peter and his sister had tonsillitis then in all probability that’s where they would have been treated.

I would have to say though that I never encountered any of the 'butterfly' nurses he mentioned at the City Hospital to which I was a frequent visitor in a professional capacity between 1981 and its closure."

Donald Grant, Penicuik, Midlothian, Scotland:  22 March, 2016

Question for Peter Giles

I've sent an email to Peter Giles, asking him the question that Donald Grant has posed above.  i.e. "What was the reason for Peter and his sister being in the hospital?"

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  8 September 2016

 

Recollections

48.

Peter D Giles

Australia

Thank you to Peter D Giles who wrote:

Princes Margaret Rose Hospital

Why in Hospital?

"My sister and I were not at the hospital because of an illness, but because our parents were not able to cope with us at home due to a bad separation of our parents at the time.  We were in the hospital awaiting a transfer to the convent."

Cots

"There were a lot of children at the hospital.  Most of us were in cots."

Nurses' Uniforms

"We had a few ‘nurses’ attending to us ever day with the small normal head-dresses on, but over in the main hospital building, at least to a few of the nurses wore very big head-dresses that looked like butterfly wings.

They may have been nuns, training nuns, nurses or just as outside observers, but whatever they were, that's what we saw."

Records and Photos

"I've been trying to discover if Lothian Health Board have any records of our stay at  Princes Margaret Rose Hospital, but Ive now got my closure on that.

They contacted me earlier this year telling me that they had not been able to trace any record of our stay there and that they cannot help me any further.

I'm surprised that so few records and even fewer photos appear to have survived from Princes Margaret Rose Hospital as it was one of Scotland's leading teaching hospitals at the time."

Peter D Giles, Australia:  31 January 2016

Reply to Peter?

Unfortunately, l don't know the answer to the question that Peter asks.  Colinton is not a part of the city that I'm very familiar with.  Perhaps somebody with a better knowledge of the history of Colinton will be able to provide the answer.

If you have any information that you'd like to pass on to Peter, please email me to let me know, then I'll give you Peter's email address so that you will be able to send your message direct to him.

Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  6 February 2016

 

Recollections

49.

Les Braby

Borders, Scotland

Thank you to Les Braby who wrote:

Princes Margaret Rose Hospital

"I notice my old friend Allan Dodds has commented on the Princes Margaret Rose hospital in his Recollections 45 above.  He is quite right in saying that the PMR Hospital was on the Frogston Road, as I said.  It was on the north side of Frogston Road."

City Hospital

"The other hospital that I was referring to is the City Hospital which was just NE of Redford Barracks.  It was approached from the A702 (Morningside) via Greenbank Drive, or via the Glenlockhart Road from Colinton Road.

It was a large Victorian structure that started out as Fever Hospital.   It has now closed, been knocked down and housing has been built on the site. Quite when this was done, I don't know, but certainly after the 1970s.

If you look at the map South, you will see the PMR Hospital on the north side of the Frogston Road."

Other Nearby Hospitals

"Other than the hospitals in Morningside, which Allan has mentioned, there were no others nearby to my knowledge, except perhaps Woodfield Convent, if that was a hospital as well as being a convent.

Woodfield Convent can be seen on 1955/56 maps of Edinburgh, just off Woodhall Road, set in its own grounds."

les Braby, Borders, Scotland:  10 February 2016  (2 emails)

 

Recollections

50.

Ray Melville

Rosyth, Fife, Scotland

Thank you to Les Braby who wrote:

Princes Margaret Rose Hospital

"I agree.  The hospital that Peter D Giles remembers seems more likely to be Princes Margaret Rose Hospital in Frogston Road than The Deaconess Hospital.

The Princes Margaret Rose Hospital is also much nearer to the Pentlands than the City Hospital."

Ray Melville, Rosyth, Fife, Scotland:  12 February 2016

 

Recollections

51.

Kevin Kelly

Stafford, Staffordshire, England

Thank you to Kevin Kelly who wrote:

Bonaly Tower

WW2 Group Photo

"I was reminded that, last year, a friend of mine found a WW2 photo in the loft, which was a formal study of a group of servicemen with some stone building behind them. The photo had been marked, 'Bonaly Tower, near Edinburgh' and I think was dated December 1941.

The thing which intrigued me was that out of about 55 men, roughly a third of them were RAF and the remainder army.

-  None of the RAF men had aircrew badges, but almost all of them wore RAF Volunteer Reserve badges and all appeared to be officers (most of relatively junior rank). 

-  Of the army men, all bar two were officers. One was in service dress and Sam Browne belt, but all the others were in battledress. From the units which could be recognised, several were Royal Artillery, but there were a couple of Pioneer Corps men and about a dozen had Tam O' Shanters with various Scottish regimental badges on. 

A good proportion of these men wore medal ribbons, which (for 1941) suggested that they had been WW1 veterans.

The photo had been signed by just under half the number of men shown and I can recall that there was one Lieutenant Colonel, with a good smattering of Captains and Majors.

Were the Men on a Course?

All I can think, is that this was some sort of course at Bonaly Tower, as the group seemed very 'officer heavy' for it to be a unit photo - and why the mix of Army & RAF?

I tried to do some research last year and was able to confirm that it was definitely Bonaly Tower (the background fits with the steps, windows and sculpture visible), but I found nothing about what Bonaly Tower had been used for during the War.

I think I found something about an anti-aircraft range not far away and wondered whether that was the connection - the RAF co-ordinated the flying targets for the guns (which of course would be manned by Royal Artillery).   

Anyway, I wondered whether you might be able to throw any light on this, or pass me on to someone else you know who might?

I anticipated your obvious question - about seeing the photo - so rang my friend, who as you might know, cannot now find it! However, when it turns up, I'll let you know!

Kevin Kelly, Stafford, Staffordshire, England:  27 February 2017

Reply to Colin?

If you'd like to respond to any of the points that Colin has raised above, please email me to let me know, then I'll pass Colin's email address to you.

Colin:  sorry but I don't have any answers for you.  However, you could try contacting the Colinton Local History Society and asking if any of their members is able to give you any information.    I hope you will be able to discover more about the photo.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  9 March 2017

 

Recollections

52.

Susan Murphy

Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

Thank you to Kevin Kelly who wrote:

World War 2

"Hi everyone.   I have so enjoyed reading all of your posts about the Colinton area, particularly during WW2. I am really interested in seeing if any of you might be able to answer a few questions for me. I'm an Australian author, based in South Australia, but I am writing about the story of my grandparents who met and married in Edinburgh in the early-1940s.

My Grandmother

My grandmother, Mary Chisholm, was born in Glasgow but, after her mother died in childbirth, she ended up living in St Catharine's convent in Lauriston Gardens, Edinburgh.

She then went into the army and from what I recall, she worked with munitions somewhere near Edinburgh.  (I'm not sure where.)

My Grandfather

My grandfather, William James Teague, was from Bournemouth in England and when he was drafted, came to Redford Barracks in Colinton. This is where I believe they met at a dance.

My Questions

So, my questions to you all are:

1.  If a woman was in the Auxiliary Territorial Service, working in munitions, where might she have worked? 

Was there anywhere near Edinburgh or Colinton?

Also, Is it likely that she would have lived on camp, in barracks, or in a share house near the factory with other working women?

2. If my grandparents met in or around Colinton, where might they have gone to eat or on a date?

Was there somewhere that he might have taken her or did that sort of thing just not happen in that time due to curfews, air raids etc.?

3. In terms of transport, if my grandfather was leaving Redford barracks and going to Edinburgh, would he have caught a tram, or bus, or train?

4. In terms of transport, if my grandfather was leaving Redford What did the soldiers do for fun around the area? Did they hang out in certain places or did they tend to stay on the barracks?

5. Lastly, what was Christmas like around there during the War?

Would there have been snow?

Are they any local traditions or things that the locals do?

I'd love to try and get a feel for the time/place.

Please Reply  ***

I would appreciate any information that anyone can provide about life at that time in and around the area. It's so hard to write about a time and place that you didn't experience yourself, but I promise to give you a mention in the book credits for anything you can help me with.

I look forward to reading your responses..

Susan Murphy, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia:   6+8 July 2017

 ***  Reply to Susan?

If you'd like to respond to any of the questions that Susan has asked above, please email me to let me know, then I'll pass on her email address to you.

I could also add any reply that you send to this page on the EdinPhoto web site, if you would be happy for me to do that, so that it can be shared with others.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  8 July 2017

 

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