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Cafés

and

Restaurants

and a few Pubs

 

Recollections

1.

Bob Sinclair
Queensland Australia

-  The Green Door

-  The West End Café

2.

Al Lorentzen
Inverness, Illinois, USA

-  Old Fleshmarket Close

-  Fleshmarket Close

-  Anchor Close

-  Warriston Close

-  Advocate's Close

3.

Mike Cheyne
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland, England

-  The New Yorker

-  La Boheme

4.

Bryan Gourlay
Biggar. Lanarkshire, Scotland

-  The New Yorker

-  Meals

5.

Jim Cairns
Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland

-  The Green Door

-  The Hungry i

6.

Terry McGuire
Coventry, Warwickshire, England

-  West End Café

7.

David Bain
Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England

North St Andrew Street

7.

Reply 1

Harry (Brandy) Simpson
Corstorphine, Edinburgh

North St Andrew Street

8.

Bob Sinclair
Queensland Australia

Lothian Road

8.

Reply 1

Sandy Cameron
Edinburgh

Lothian Road

9.

Jim Cairns
Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland

-  Pied Piper

10.

Bruce Johnstone
Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland

-  Pied Piper

-  Others near the West End

-  Drinks

11.

Gus Coutts
Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland

The Hungry 'I'

12.

Jim Cairns
Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland

-  Pied Piper

The Hungry i

13.

Frank Ferri
Newhaven, Edinburgh

-  Milk Bar Era

14.

Gus Coutts
Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland

The Hungry 'I'

15.

Dorothy Addison
Tsawwassen, British Columbia, Canada.

West End café

16.

Dorothy Addison
Tsawwassen, British Columbia, Canada.

-  Milk Bar

17.

Jim Woolard

The Hungry i

18.

Joyce Lamont Messer
Whanganui, North Island, New Zealand

-  The Conspirators' café

The Café

-  Meals

-  Customers

19.

Frank Ferri
Newhaven, Edinburgh

Austin’s Café / Restaurant

-  Leith Street

-  Waitresses

-  Cakes

-  Pictures

20.

Nick Swindale
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

-  The Conspirators café

-  Owners + Café Name

-  Meals

21.

Joyce Lamont Messer
Whanganui, North Island, New Zealand

-  The Conspirators café

-  The Name

-   Midnight Closing

22.

Gus Coutts
Duddingston, Edinburgh

-  The Continental café

23.

Nick Swindale
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

-  The Conspirators café

24.

Joyce Lamont Messer
Whanganui, North Island, New Zealand

-  The Conspirators café

-  Photos

-  Back Yard

-  Mouse

25.

Norman R Pope
Sidney, British Columbia, Canada

-  The Continental café

26.

Marie Johnson
Jamestown, Foothills of California, USA

-  The Manhattan café

27.

David Sanderson
Lake Forest, California, USA

-  Mackie's Restaurant

28.

Keith Miller
Oban, Argyle & Bute, Scotland

-  Pied Piper Café

29.

Rob Fender
England

-  The Manhattan Coffee Bar

30.

Rosemary Shariff (née Craig)
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

-  The Sandwich Bar

31.

John Mills
Southside, Edinburgh

La Fiesta

32.

Allan Dodds
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

La Fiesta - Photo

33.

Dorothy Finlay (née Cossar)
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

-  Deep Sea Restaurant

34.

June Wood (née Robertson)
Central Coast, California, USA

-  Deep Sea Restaurant

-  Ball's Fish & Chips

35.

Meg Reilly

-  Deep Sea Restaurant

-  Near the Royal Infirmary

35.
Reply 1

Stuart Lyon
Blackford, Edinburgh

-  Barbecue Restaurant

35.
Reply 2

Ray Melville

-  Doctor's Public House

-  Sandy Bell's Bar

35.
Reply 3

Allan Dodds
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, Scotland

-  Sandy Bell's Bar

-  Gordon Brown

36.

Dorothy Finlay (née Cossar)
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

-  The Union Grill

37.

Catherine Jamieson
San Diego, California, USA

West End Café

-  Manhatten Café

-  No longer there

38.

Ray Melville
Rosyth, Fife, Scotland

-  The Stockpot

39.

Avril Finlayson Smith
Strathdale, Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

-  Café  Honeydew

40.

Sandy Cameron
Edinburgh

-  More Cafés

-  The Elizabethan

-  The Carolina

41.

Rosari Laughlin 
(née Jeanette Rosari Durrell Nisbet
)
Lake Charles, Louisiana, USA

-  More to USA

-  Edinburgh Cafés

-  Brattisani's

-  Francis Café

42.

Paul Sutherland
Glasgow, Scotland

The Grail

43.

Sandy Sievwright
Penicuik, Midlothian

-  Rellio's, Haymarket

-  After 'The Cavendish'

-  Meals

-  The Walk Home

44.

Sandy Sievwright
Penicuik, Midlothian

-  Thistle Street

-  Business Lunch

-  The Thistle

-  The Tatler

-  Homely Food

45.

Peter Stubbs
Edinburgh

-  Standard Life

-  Woolworths

46.

Avril Finlayson Smith
(née Young)

Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

-  St Andrew Square

-  Gow's Restaurant, Rose Street

47.

Nan Scott
Pakenham, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

-  Lunch Vouchers

48.

Iain Stewart
Barcelona, Spain

-  The Grail

49.

Allan Dodds
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

La Fiesta - Exterior Photo

50.

Gordon Rule
Edinburgh

Pied Piper Café

51.

Gail Pike
South Carolina, USA

Pied Piper Café

52.

Bob Leslie
Glasgow, Scotland

Deep Sea Restaurant

53.

Eileen Shay (née Byrne)
Florida, USA

West End Café

-  Manhattan Café

54.

Allan Dodds
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

La Fiesta - Exterior Photo

55.

Ronnie Aitchison

-  Manhattan Café

-  Coffee Joe's

56.

David Bain
Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England

-  The Bistro, Bruntsfield

57.

Mal Acton
Liverpool, Lancashire, England

Waverley Steps Café

-  Covenanters' Arms Pub

58.

Paula Hogan (née Brine)

-  The Laigh Coffee House

59.

Peter Stubbs
Edinburgh

-  The Laigh Coffee House

-  Edinburgh

-  Open Fire

60.

Paula Hogan (née Brine)

-  Edinburgh in 1960s

-  Henderson's Café

The Laigh Coffee House

60.

Reply

1.

Paul Sutherland
Glasgow, Scotland

The Laigh Coffee House

61.

Ronnie Aitchison

-  Coffee Joe's

-  Part time Job

-  Pizza Maker

-  Kenny Smyth

-  Sandy Bell's

-  My Dad

-  Smoke

62.

Stuart Lyon
Blackford, Edinburgh

-  George IV Bridge

Pub opposite Central Library

63.

Wim van der Hoek
Sint Anthonis, Netherlands

Crawford's Tea Rooms

-  Question

63.

Reply

Peter Stubbs
Edinburgh

Crawford's Tea Rooms

-  Question

64.

Adrian Coppola

Barbecue and Pied Piper

65.

Mike Borys
Edinburgh

The Bandura Café

66.

Mike Borys
Edinburgh

-  Cafés

67.

Alison Boocock, Edinburgh

The Bandura Café

68.

Alison Boocock, Edinburgh

The Bandura Café

69.

Allan Dodds
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Goldenacre Café

69.

Reply 1.

Mike Crean
Dorking, Surrey, England

69.

Reply 2.

Allan Dodds
Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

70.

Alan Grieve
Minehead, Somerset, England

Royal Mile Café

70.

Reply 1.

Phil Wilson
Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

70.

Reply 2.

James A Rafferty
Dorking, Surrey, England

70.

Reply 3.

Brian (JB)

71.

Andrew McFadden
Inverness, Inverness-shire, Scotland

The Hideaway Cafe

72.

Lorna McKay

Fairley's Restaurant

73.

Ian Smith
Ayr, Ayrshire, Scotland

-  Deep Sea Restaurant

74.

Margaret Inglis

-  Larry's Café

-  The National Restaurant

75.

Eric Gold
East End, London, England

Lothian Road Café

-  Bread Street Café

-  Other Edinburgh Cafés

76.

Eric Gold
East End, London, England

Capolla's Café

-  Frank Capolla

77.

Terry Bayles

The Hungry i

78.

George Roy
Beijing, China

-  The Quick and Twenty

   Restaurant above Crawford's

79.

Keith Miller
Oban, Argyll & Bute, Scotland

-  Forest Road

     -  De Marco's

     -  Lannie's

     -  Willy Wozniac's

80.

Keith Miller
Oban, Argyll & Bute, Scotland

-  Forest Road Area

81.

Norman Smith
Halifax, West Yorkshire, England

-  The Laigh Coffee House

82.

Norman Smith
Halifax, West Yorkshire, England

-  The Laigh Coffee House

83.

Colin Kelly
Wellington, New Zealand

-  Crawford's Café

84.

Stuart Lyon
Blackford, Edinburgh

-  Black & White Café

84.

Reply 1

Simon Capaldi

-  Black & White Café

    -   Juicy Lucy's

84.

Reply 2

Stuart Lyon
Blackford, Edinburgh

-  Black & White Café

    -   NOT Juicy Lucy's

84.

Reply 3

Stuart Lyon
Blackford, Edinburgh

-  Black & White Café

    -   Location

84.

Reply 4

Stuart Lyon
Blackford, Edinburgh

-  Black & White Café

    -   POSSIBLY The Allegro

84.

Reply 5

Stuart Lyon
Blackford, Edinburgh

-  Black & White Café

    -   POSSIBLY New York, New York

84.

Reply 6

Stuart Lyon
Blackford, Edinburgh

-  Black & White Café

    -   NOT New York, New York

85.

David Moore
Sleaford, Lincolnshire, England

-  The West End Café

-   More Jazz

86.

Norman Fisher
Saratoga, New South Wales, Australia

-  Hamburger Restaurant

    - 137 Princes Street

86.
Reply 1

Darryn McGreevy

-  Hamburger Restaurant

    - 137 Princes Street

Recollections

1.

Bob Sinclair

Queensland, Australia:  December, 2009

Thank you to Bob Sinclair who wrote:

The Green Door

"I remember the Green Door.  I'm not sure if it was actually called that.  It was down some steps from Johnston Terrace.  It was popular for a while and followed the success of the song Green Door - I wonder what's going on behind the Green Door."

The West End Café

"I remember the West End Café  in Shandwick Place, almost directly opposite the Milk Bar.  A friend who worked in American Express, a few doors along from Binns, took me there.

I saw Johnny Dankworth and Cleo Laine (now Sir John and Dame Cleo) there.  They were there quite frequently.  Great talent!"

Bob Sinclair, Queensland, Australia:  December 7, 2009

Recollections

2.

Al Lorentzen

Inverness, Illinois, USA

The Manhattan

Around 1960

Monseigneur News Theatre and The Manhattan, Princes Street ©

Thank you to Al Lorentzen for allowing me to reproduce this photograph of The Manhattan, taken around 1960.  The Manhattan was near the West End of Princes Street.  The car on the left in this photo is a Morris Minor.

Al wrote:

"The Manhattan was a great place for a snack in the late 1950s.  I don't know if it is still there."

Al Lorentzen, Inverness, Illinois, USA:  August 26, 2010

Location

The Monseigneur Theatre, with The Manhattan below it, was at 131 Princes Street.

The shop next door on the right, at No 130, with the Royal Coat of Arms (by Appointment to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth)  is Jamieson & Sons, fruiterers.

Today

Now (in 2010), Gap clothing store is at 131 Princes Street, and HMV CD and Record store is next door at 130 Princes Street.

 

Recollections

3.

Mike Cheyne

Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland, England

Mike Cheyne replied to Al Lorentzen's comments in 2 above:

Mike wrote:

"Reading Al Lorentzen's reminiscences of The Manhattan remind me of other haunts of my mis-spent youth in the late- 1950s and early-1960s

The New Yorker

-  In Shandwick Place there was The New Yorker, a kind of American diner, and The Stafford Café .

La Boheme

- Down in Stockbridge, there was the La Boheme.  As suggested by the name, it was full of groovy people like me!"

Mike Cheyne, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland, England:
Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook, September 4, 2010

 

Recollections

4.

Bryan Gourlay

Biggar, Lanarkshire, Scotland

Thank you to Bryan Gourlay who wrote:

The New Yorker

"I can remember making a good number of visits to the New Yorker restaurant in Shandwick Place, mentioned by Matthew Cheyne  (3 above).  It was a US diner type of place, opened with a great fanfare in 1961 or 1962.

The waitresses took your order, then plugged a microphone into the end of the table and conveyed your order to the kitchen by some sort of audio link, way too high tech for Edinburgh at the time. After a period of time they dispensed with the audio link and reverted to writing on order slips."

Meals

"My favourites were Haddock and Chips (2/6d) or Lemon Sole and Chips for 3/6d."

Bryan Gourlay, Biggar, Lanarkshire, Scotland:  September 7, 2010

 

Recollections

5.

Jim Cairns

Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland

Thank you to Jim Cairns who wrote:

The Green Door

"My memory was jogged by Bob Sinclair’s mention of the Green Door. I’m reasonably sure that it was run by the church, St Columba’s by the Castle;  aiming to attract young folk and give them somewhere to go, I suppose."

The Hungry i

"Does anyone remember 'The Hungry i' in Queensferry Street?  It had a diner upstairs, and downstairs was a less formal coffee bar.  It had a great atmosphere, and a terrific juke box with an unusually wide selection of records.

To keep trouble in check, they employed a bouncer from London who had a big black moustache which made him look Spanish.  He was referred to as ‘Don Carlos’, but that wasn’t his name.

He carried a little wooden coffin with his calling card - no doubt copied from the TV series ‘Have Gun, Will Travel'.  He never had to raise his voice to keep order.  Unfortunately, he liked a drink, and it was said that he was in a nearby pub, instead of being in the coffee bar, when somebody modified the juke box with a well-aimed kick.   End of Don Carlos!"

Meals

"My favourites were Haddock and Chips (2/6d) or Lemon Sole and Chips for 3/6d."

Jim Cairns, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland

 

Recollections

6.

Terry McGuire

Coventry, Warwickshire, England

Thank you to Terry McGuire who wrote:

West End Café

"I was taken to the West End Café  by a nurse from Leith hospital, after having had an ear operation.  Edmundo Ross was playing his hit of the time:

'Bongo, Bongo, Bongo,
I don't want to leave the Congo,'

 I thought the nurse fancied me, but she was just using me as an excuse to take another patient, a Royal Marine.  I was just a teenage cover for her ploy !!"

Terry McGuire, Coventry, Warwickshire, England

 

Recollections

7.

David Bain

Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England

Thank you to David Bain who wrote:

North St Andrew Street

"Does anyone else remember the Café  downstairs on the east corner of North St. Andrew Street and Queen Street?  I can still smell the atmosphere of cigarettes and burger grease.

It was run by a bloke called Bill who was very pleasant but big enough not to be messed with."

Arrow Motorcycle

"I remember throwing my Ariel Arrow motorbike up St Andrew Street showing off in the rain;  it was more slippery than I thought!

   Aerial Arrow Motorcycle and Morris Minor car photographed in the 1960s, probably at Lasswade Road, Edinburgh ©

The occupant of the top flat, over the Café , was forever calling the police because of the noise  the various bikes made."

Cigarette Lighter

"This was in about 1967, and gas lighters had recently appeared. I remember a friend turning up the flame on a fellow rocker's lighter so when he went to light his cigarette it set his overhanging hair on fire. My, how we laughed!"

David Bain, Rotherham, South Yorkshire, Edinburgh:  September 15, 2010

 

Recollections

7.

Reply

1.

Harry (Brandy) Simpson

Corstorphine, Edinburgh

Thank you to Brandy Simpson who wrote:

North St Andrew Street

"The Café  that David Bain was asking about in Recollections 7 above was 'The Hideaway'."

Harry (Brandy) Simpson, Corstorphine, Edinburgh:  July 5, 2012

 Recollections

8.

Bob Sinclair

Queensland, Australia

Thank you to Bob Sinclair  who wrote:

Lothian Road

"I remember a Café  in Lothian Road where you could sit on stools looking out to the Usher Hall and Lothian Road.  The food there was snack type.  It was not all that great, but it filled a space.

Nearby, there was the Railway Canteen, at the back of the Caledonian Hotel.  It was a great place for good food at a low price."

Bob Sinclair, Queensland, Australia:  October 27, 2010

 Recollections

8.

Reply

1.

Sandy Cameron

Edinburgh

Thank you to Sandy Cameron who wrote

Lothian Road

"In answer to Bob Sinclair's question about the Café  in Lothian Road (in Recollections 8 above) I'm sure that the snack bar in the centre of this photo would have been the Café  that he remembers:

Lothian Road -  Cafe opposite the Usher Hall  -  Photo probably taken in the 1980s ©

It was directly opposite the Usher Hall in Lothian Road.  They did a delicious hamburger and fried onion roll.

Sandy Cameron, Edinburgh:  July 6, 2012

Date of the Photo

    Lothian Road -  Cafe opposite the Usher Hall  -  Photo probably taken in the 1980s ©

Please click on the thumbnail image above to enlarge it.

Sandy tells me that he has had this photo for quite a while.  He cannot remember where this photo came from, and he does not know who the photographer might have been.

I think the photo may  have been taken some time around the 1980s.  The registration number on the approaching taxi has a suffix 'B'' so the taxi would have been first registered in 1984.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  July 8, 2012

Update

I have now received several more recollections about this Café , so I have given it a separate page on the web site.  Please click on the tumbnail image below then scroll down to read the page.

    Lothian Road -  Cafe opposite the Usher Hall  -  Photo probably taken in the 1980s ©

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  July 8, 2012

Recollections

9.

Jim Cairns

Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland

Thank you to Bryan Gourlay for sending me this photograph of the Pied Piper Coffee Bar in South Charlotte Street in the early-1960s.

The Pied Piper

    South Charlotte Street - The Pied Piper - Early-1960s ©

"The 'Pied Piper' in South Charlotte Street was a favourite Coffee Bar in Edinburgh.  It was quite large, but always very busy.

The National Provincial Building Society later took over the premises.  Now it is occupied by the Dunfermline Building Society."

Jim Cairns, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland:  November 28, 2010

Recollections

10.

Bruce Johnstone

Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland

Thank you to Bryan Gourlay for sending me this photograph of the Pied Piper Coffee Bar in South Charlotte Street in the early-1960s.

The Pied Piper

"Jim Cairns' comments, above, reminded me of the 'Pied Piper'.   I frequented it, mainly on a Sunday evening in 1962/63 when it was very busy. The basement was the busier area."

Other Clubs near the West End

"There was also the 'New Yorker' in Shandwick Place and another Café  in Shandwick Place,  beyond Melville Street.  What was that called?

Drinks

"Coke floats and coffees were the order of the day - a simple life!"

Bruce Johnston, Haddington, East Lothian, Scotland:  November 28, 2010

Recollections

11.

Gus Coutts

Duddingston, Edinburgh

Thank you to Gus Coutts who replied to Bruce Johnstone's question in 10 above.

Gus wrote:

The Hungry I

"I think the café in Queensferry Street was The Hungry I.

I believe it was named after a café in the US;  San Francisco rings a bell in my memory."

Gus Coutts, Duddingston, Edinburgh:  November 29, 2010

  

Recollections

12.

Jim Cairns

Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland

Thank you to Jim Cairns who replied:

The Pied Piper

"It's nice to hear that other people remember 'The Pied Piper' fondly."

The Hungry i

"Bruce Johnston asked about the coffee bar beyond Melville Street.  It was 'The Hungry i'.

I wrote about it a few weeks ago.  (See 'Recollections 5' above.)"

Jim Cairns, Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland

 

Recollections

13.

Frank Ferri

Newhaven, Edinburgh

Frank Ferri wrote:

Milk Bar Era

"Does anyone remember the Milk Bar era?

There was one in South St David Street and another in Shandwick Place on the left.'

Frank Ferri, Newhaven:  November 29, 2010

Recollections

14.

Gus Coutts

Duddingston, Edinburgh

Thank you to Gus Coutts who added:

The Hungry I

"On googling 'The Hungry I', I see that it was a nightclub in San Francisco back in the 1950s/1960s, but the name is now used by a strip club."

Gus Coutts, Duddingston, Edinburgh:  November 29, 2010

Recollections

15.

Dorothy Addison (née Jenkins)

Tsawwassen, British Columbia, Canada.

Winton replied to Bruce Johnston's question in 'Recollections 10' above.

The West End Café

"I believe that the 'other Café ' in Shandwick Place that Bruce Johnston mentions was called 'The West End Café '.

Every Sunday evening, it was packed with young people as they played wonderful music there.

That's the only other Café  that I remember being there.  (If I'm wrong, I'm sorry.)

Dorothy Addison, Tsawwassen, British Columbia, Canada:  December 7, 2010

Recollections

16.

Dorothy Addison (née Jenkins)

Tsawwassen, British Columbia, Canada.

Dorothy Addison responded to Frank Ferri's message in 'Recollections 13' above:

Milk Bar

"The Milk Bar in Shandwick Place that Frank refers to was a wonderful place.  If I remember correctly, we had to go up some steps to it.

I loved all those lovely fresh filled rolls they sold.  There was a queue at lunch time every day.

It was 1954, and I worked in the dog salon at Gibbs in Shandwick Place at that time, washing and doing all these things to make the dogs look beautiful.  This was done upstairs in the store."

Dorothy Addison, Tsawwassen, British Columbia, Canada:  December 7, 2010

The Milk Bar that Dorothy remembers can be seen on the left of this  photo, taken in 1961.  Please click on the thumbnail image below to enlarge it:

Looking to the east along Shandwick Place, towards the West End of Princes Streeet, as the tram lines were being lifted in 1955 ©

Recollections

17.

Jim Woolard

Werribee, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Jim Woolard wrote:

The Hungry i

"The best bacon rolls in town were to be had at .The Hungry i'.
It was also very handy for the bus stop to get me back to Granton."

Jim Woolard, Werribee, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Recollections

18.

Joyce Lamont Messer

Whanganui,  North Island, New Zealand

Joyce Lamont Messer wrote:

The Conspirators' Café

The Café

"I wonder if anyone remembers the Conspirators, Café .  It was  just along from the King's Theatre,  towards Bruntsfield.    I worked there, evenings and weekends,  in early/mid-1950s after my day job in a  law office.

I thought I was 'very cool' in today's parlance.  It must have been one of the first in the then 'new Café  culture' scene.  It was much more laid-back than the more formal restaurants in the city.

It was around then that some students made off with the Destiny Stone from Westminster Abbey.  I think that was why the Café  was so named."

Meals

"We served  mostly coffee and omelettes,  both of variable quality since no-one seemed to know much about cooking.  I certainly did not,  though I became reasonably  good at omelettes."

Customers

"I think the owner was related to the broadcaster, Franklin Englemann, of Housewives Choice fame.

The Café  was always very busy and  popular with students, especially  after   Edinburgh Festival productions at the King's Theatre when the place used to be packed out.

I've served up my omelettes to several famous conductors, singers and actors, mostly now dead - but not because of my cooking."

Joyce Lamont Messer, Whanganui, North Island, New Zealand:  April 15, 2011

Recollections

19.

Frank Ferri

Newhaven, Edinburgh

Frank Ferri wrote:

Austin’s Café / Restaurant

Leith Street

"I remember Austin’s Café.  It was located on the left hand side of Leith St going up towards Princes St, set back off the pavement, just before Halfords and Jackson’s the Tailors."

Waitresses

"The waitress staff wore uniforms of black dress, white collar, white bib pinafore and a little tiara.  The furnishings and layout were just like an Agatha Christie film set, so 1920s.  Each table had a triple lair cake stand with fancy cakes on display."

Cakes

"I remember being taken there as a kid by my mother, eager to get my hands on the cakes, but being warned they cost a tanner each so keep your hands to yourself."

Pictures?

"I think it was still there in the early-1960s.  I wonder if anyone has got any data or pictures of it."

Frank Ferri, Newhaven, Edinburgh:  May 18, 2011

Recollections

20.

Nick Swindale

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Nicholas replied to 'Recollections 18' above

The Conspirators' Café

Owners and Café  Name

"The Conspirator's Café  was owned jointly by my father, Owen Swindale, and his brother-in-law, Ian Engelmann (whose
uncle was the broadcaster Franklin Engelmann).

 The name of the Café  had nothing to do with the Stone of Scone, but was inspired by an 18th century poem with that title."

Meals

"In addition to making omelettes, my mother, Tessa, made a chocolate gateau which she said was always very popular.

 Another attraction was that the Café  was open until midnight - unheard of in Edinburgh at that time. I still remember the smell of the Expresso coffee from when I was about four or five years old."

Nick Swindale, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada:  August 5, 2011

Recollections

21.

Joyce Lamont Messer

Whanganui,  North Island, New Zealand

After reading 'Recollections 20' above, Joyce emailed me again to follow up her comments in 'Recollections 18' above.  She wrote:

The Conspirators' Café

The Name

"I am obviously wrong about how the Café  got its name.

Several Edinburgh students were involved in planning the removal of the Destiny Stone from Westminster Abbey.  One of them was a vet student at the Dick.

I thought he went to jail because there was much discussion about him continuing to study while inside - but Mr Wikipedia says that charges were not laid, which does ot tie up with my memory of events.

I knew some of the students and they certainly came into the Café , which is where I guess I got the idea about the name.  The stone business must have pre-dated the opening of the Café ."

Midnight Closing

"Owen's son, Nicholas, is right about the Café  closing at midnight.  Reeking of cigarette smoke and fried food, I used to walk back to Morningside across Bruntsfield Links, for a few hours' sleep before heading off early the next morning for another day as Shepherd & Wedderburn, confounding the  legal fraternity with my creative shorthand and typing."

Joyce Lamont Messer, Whanganui, North Island, New Zealand:  April 15, 2011

 

Recollections

22.

Gus Coutts

Duddingston, Edinburgh

Gus Coutts who wrote:

The Continental Café ?

"In the early 1960s myself and friends used to occasionally go. in the early hours. to a Café /restaurant  which was open all or nearly all night.  If I recall correctly, it was about the only place open after midnight in the city.

I remember eating Wiener Schnitzel there.

We knew it as The Continental Café , but I don't know if that was its correct name.

It was upstairs in a building near the top of Morrison Street, on the Princes St. side of the street, about opposite Semple Street, or perhaps a bit further down."

Question

"Does anybody out there remember this place and have more information about it?"

Gus Coutts, Duddingston, Edinburgh:  August 7, 2011

 

Recollections

23.

Nick Swindale

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

The Conspirators' Café

Thank you to Nick Swindale for writing again, enclosing these two photos of The Conspirators Café .

Please click on the thumbnail images below to enlarge them:

The Conspirators Cafe, near King's Theatre, Bruntsfield, Edinburgh ©            The Conspirators Cafe, near King's Theatre, Bruntsfield, Edinburgh ©

Acknowledgement:  Nick Swindale, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada:  August 10, 2011

Recollections

24.

Joyce Lamont Messer

Whanganui,  North Island, New Zealand

Joyce Lamont Messer replied

The Conspirators' Café

Photos

"Thanks for adding the photos.  The café looks so 1950s - restrained and neat!  Seeing the photos certainly brought back memories."

Back Yard

"There was a small back yard, enclosed in an ancient brick wall.  These days, it would be tarted up and turned into an 'alfresco dining' area.  Then, it was just a place to store things."

Mouse

"I can remember a mouse running through the café, much to the horror of the diners, some of whom got on their chairs.

 Someone in the kitchen managed to hit it with something, slightly stunning it as it staggered into the yard where I finished it off with a brick while trying not to look at the result."

Joyce Lamont Messer, Whanganui, North Island, New Zealand:  August 13, 2011

 

Recollections

25.

Norman R Pope

Sidney, British Columbia, Canada

Norman wrote:

The Continental Café?

"Yes, we remember the Continental. I cannot remember its exact address, but the description above of where it is, sounds right.

That was where my girl friend and I (now my wife of 47 years) learned to eat 'real' spaghetti.  I mean spaghetti that did not come out of a can.

Her favourite meal was the pineapple omelette and I had to have chips with my spaghetti.  Our favourite waitress was called Margaret.  She always looked after us very well."

Norman R Pope, Sidney, British Columbia, Canada

 

Recollections

26

Mary (Mari) Johnson

Jamestown, Foothills of California, USA

Thank you to Marie Johnson, who wrote:

The Manhattan Cafe

"The Manhattan Cafe on Princes Street was a great place for coffee or lunch.  It was owned and operated by Mr and Mrs Valente."

Marie Johnson, Jamestown, Foothills of California, USA:

 

Recollections

27

David Sanderson

Lake Forest California, USA

Thank you to David Sanderson, who wrote:

Mackie's Restaurant

"I grew up in the little town of Tranent in  East Lothian.  Every other Saturday we all came into Edinburgh for an afternoon of shopping in Princes Street.  Usually, it was my mum, granny and myself.  My dad usually went off to Tynecastle.

Part of the routine was always afternoon tea in Mackies.  We usually went upstairs to the proper restaurant with tablecloths and uniformed waitresses where we would have tea and toast, although I always had some juice, usually Hendrys red cola!

Occasionally we went downstairs to the self-serve café where I would take childish pleasure in sliding the tray along the rails to the cashier at the end.

I think Mackie's closed in the early-1970s.  I remember being a bit surprised by this as it always seemed busy."

David Sanderson, Lake Forest, California, USA:  September 1, 2011

Update

Thank you to Nigel Baxter for reading David Sanderson's recollections of  Mackie's restaurant in Princes Street, above, and for sending me a copy of his photo titled:

 Drinks in Mackie's

     ©

Edinburgh Castle, on Castle Rock, across Princes Street Gardens can be seen looking through the restaurant window in this photo.

Please click on the thumbnail image above to enlarge it.

Nigel Baxter, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada:  October 8, 2012

 

Recollections

28

Keith Miller

Oban, Argyle & Bute, Scotland

Thank you to Keith Miller, who wrote:

The Pied Piper Café

"On reading the contributions from Gordon Rule (Hi Gordon, long time...) and others on the Pied Piper Café  in Charlotte Street, I was transported back to the heady days of Edinburgh in the mid 1960s."

Fashions

Mid-1960s

"I spent time - maybe too much time - in the Pied Piper, downstairs in the great melting pot of mods, faces and fashionistas from Edinburgh's vibrant club scene of the early/mid-1960s.  I think the Pied P was at it's trendsetters peak around 1966.

I have fond memories, as the explosive mod fashions from Carnaby Street hit the provinces and began to eclipse the established 'scene':

- High collared polka dot or paisley shirts, tab collars, bell bottomed jeans, when all around were drainpipes, high-heeled zip sided boots, crew necked striped t-shirts, shiny black plastic oilskin coats ... and that was the guys.

 Girls in the Mary Quant mode.

I think most of the 'Pied P' clientele in the mid-1960s were probably in their mid-teens and effectively excluded from the pub scene, which gave the place such energy and atmosphere."

Later-1960s

"And the music!  - Small Faces, Chris Farlow, etc.  It was great while it lasted, but I think it was a short interlude  -  maybe 18 months or so  -  before fashions rolled towards the hippy era and the summers of love of the later-1960s."

Later-1960s

"Happy times!  Does anyone have any photos of the fashions or of the Edinburgh's 'street scene' from that time?"

Keith Miller, Oban, Argyle & Bute, Scotland:  September 4, 2011

 

Recollections

29.

Rob Fender

England

Robert Fender, now living in England, wrote:

The Manhattan Coffee Bar

"The Manhattan Coffee Bar was owned by a friend of my aunt who used to work there.  I used to visit fairly regularly in the 1950s. It was one of the few places that was open on a Sunday.

I seem to recollect that down one side of the interior, there was a large mirror showing the Manhattan skyline."

Robert Fender, England, September 5, 2011 (2 emails)

 

Recollections

30.

Rosemary Shariff (née Craig)

Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Thank you to Rosemary Shariff for responding to one of Bob Sinclair's recollections in 8 above.

Rosemary wrote

The Sandwich Bar

"The very small Café  opposite the Usher Hall was called The Sandwich Bar.

I believe that the Café  actually belonged to the railway, but was leased for many years by the Armstrong family."

Rosemary Shariff (née Craig), Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, September 20, 2011

 

Recollections

31.

John Mills

Southside, Edinburgh

Thank you to John Mills, Southside, Edinburgh, who wrote:

La Fiesta Café

"Does anyone remember the Café , La Fiesta, which was part of the Rutland Hotel?"

It was popular with American soldiers from the Kirknewton Base who frequented it after the Berkley Bar emptied at 10 PM. It also had a very good jukebox.

Happy days!"

John Mills, Southside, Edinburgh:  December 19, 2011

Recollections

32.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Thank you to Allan Dodds who replied sending me this photo of La Fiesta Café  that he took in the 1960s.

Allan wrote

La Fiesta Café

    La Fiesta Cafe, Edinburgh - 1960s ©

"Here is a photo that I took of 'La Fiesta' Café  in the 1960s.

Sorry about the quality of this photo but that's what you get when you push Royal-X Pan to 3200 ASA!"

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  January 19, 2012

Please click on the thumbnail image above to enlarge it, and read the large sign hanging in front of the middle window that reads: 'La Fiesta'

Recollections

33.

Dorothy Finlay (née Cossar)

Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Thank you to Dorothy Finlay, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia for posting a message in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

Dorothy wrote:

Deep Sea Restaurant

"Does anyone remember the Deep Sea Café .  I think it was in Leith Walk.  You could, if funds allowed, eat in or take away.  It was the best fish and chips."

Dorothy Finlay (née Cossar), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia:
Message posted in EdinPhoto Guestbook, June 8, 2012

Yes, Dorothy.  Others have remembered the Deep Sea Restaurant in Leith Walk.  I added their comments earlier to the Leith Walk Recollections page on the EdinPhoto guest book some time ago.

I see that you have already received a couple of replies to the message that you posted in the EdinPhoto guestbook earlier today.  I've added these two replies below.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  June 8, 2012

Recollections

34.

June Wood (née Robertson)

Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Thank you to Jean Wood (née Robertson) for  also posting a reply to Dorothy Finlay's comments (33 above) in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

Jean wrote:

Deep Sea Restaurant

"Yes Dorothy.  I can taste the great fish and chips from the Deep Sea.  Now, its just a wee take out place"

Balls' Fish & Chips

"Balls, on Montrose Terrace, were also great.  On a cold winter nite, carrying the hot take-out sure kept us warm."

June Wood (née Robertson):  Brisbane, Queensland, Australia:  June 8, 2012

Recollections

35.

Meg Reilly

London, England

Thank you to Meg Reilly for  also posting a reply to Dorothy Finlay's comments (33 above) in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

Meg wrote:

Deep Sea Restaurant

"I also remember the Deep Sea"

Near the Royal Infirmary

"I remember a Café , but forget the street.  It was just up from the Royal Infirmary.  We used to go there and share a plate of chips;   fond memories."

Meg Reilly, London, England:
:Reply  to  Message from Dorothy Finlay posted in EdinPhoto Guestbook, June 8, 2012

 

Recollections

35.

Reply

1.

Stuart Lyon

Blackford, Edinburgh

Thank you to Stuart Lyon who wrote:

The Barbecue

"I wonder if Meg Reilly is thinking about The Barbecue Grill  & Restaurant in Forrest Road.  Here is a photo of the restaurant, published on 11 June 1954

Barbecue Grill & Restaurant at Lauriston Place  - 1954 ©

Stuart Lyon, Blackford, Edinburgh:  July 6, 2012

This photo may was published by Scotsman Publications on June 11, 1954, probably in the Edinburgh Evening News

Please click on the thumbnail image above to enlarge it.

 

Recollections

35.

Reply

2.

Ray Melville

Rosyth, Fife, Scotland

When I added this photo of The Barbecue Grille and Restaurant to the web site,

Photo 1

Barbecue Grill & Restaurant

   Barbecue Grill & Restaurant at Lauriston Place  - 1954 ©

I described it as being at Lauriston Place.  However its location was actually as described by Ray Melville below and its address was 32 Forrest Road.

However, Ray Melville wrote:

The Barbecue

"The Barbeque Grill and Restaurant was on the corner of Forrest Road and Teviot Place.  It  is now a pub called 'Doctors'.

I remember that it was too pricey for we poor students in the early-1970s!"

Sandy Bell's Bar

"We spent our cash in Sandy Bell's, over the road.  Although now called Sandy Bells, it was then the Forrest Hill Bar, I think, or maybe the Forrest Road Bar.

Ray Melville, Rosyth, Fife, Scotland:  July 13, 2012

After reading Ray Melville's comments above, I added this photo of Doctors, which I took in September 2007 to the web site.

Photo 2

Doctor's Public House

Doctors  - A public house at the corner of Forrest Road and Teviot Place, Edinburgh ©

 

 

Recollections

35.

Reply

3.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Thank you to Allan Dodds who read Ray Melville's message  (Reply 3 above) and replied:

Sandy Bell's Bar

"Ray Melville mentions the former name of Sandy Bell's.  When I was an undergraduate, that was the colloquial name for 'The Foresthill Bar'."

Gordon Brown

"Gordon Brown, a fellow undergraduate, used to frequent the pub with his entourage, most of them, as I recall, young girls sporting T-shirts bearing the words: 'A Gordon for me'.

Gordon used to order a round for his cronies, and would pay for it with a student's grant cheque made out to him by the Scottish Education Department. In those days cheques were legal tender, and Gordon would get back change in cash from the till.

We always felt that Gordon knew something about money that we didn't, and we weren't wrong when he eventually became Chancellor of the Exchequer!"

Alan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  July 17, 2012

 

Recollections

35.

Reply

4.

Meg Reilly

London, England

Meg Reilly, who wrote Recollections 35 above replied:

The Café

"Thanks for adding this photo of  the restaurant.

Barbecue Grill & Restaurant

   Barbecue Grill & Restaurant at Lauriston Place  - 1954 ©

But, this picture is not of the place that  I was thinking of.  In fact, the place that I remember was actually more of a Café  than a restaurant.

There is a tobacconist shop on the image above.  It can be seen if you click on the image to enlarge it.  I think the Café  was there, or thereabouts, and i think it may have been run by Italians."

Meg Reilly, London, England: July 14, 2012

Recollections

36.

Dorothy Finlay (née Cossar)

Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Thank you to Dorothy Finlay, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia for posting another message in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

Dorothy wrote:

The Union Grill

"I think that not far from The Deep Sea Café  was The Union Grill.  It served a wonderful mixed grill, but from memory it was pretty expensive, and you had to save up for it,

Crawfords Restaurants

"There was also there was a Crawfords chain of restaurants. Are they still around?"  **

Dorothy Finlay (née Cossar), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia:  June 19, 2012

Crawfords

** Yes, Crawford's Bakeries and Crawford's Restaurants were popular in Edinburgh, but there are none to be found now.  I cannot remember what happened to the company.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  July 21, 2012

 

Recollections

37.

Catherine Jamieson

San Diego, California, USA

Catherine Jamieson, San Diego, California, USA wrote:

West End Café

"I remember the West End Café , near Binns.  My friend and I would go there every Sunday night.  There was music and all the teenagers went there."

Manhattan Café

"I also remember the Manhatten Café .  They  had wonderful American milk shakes"

No longer there

"Both of these Café s no longer there.

Catherine Jamieson, San Diego, California, USA

 

Recollections

38.

Ray Melville

Rosyth, Fife, Scotland

Ray Melville wrote:

The Stockpot

"There used to be a basement Café  on the west side of Frederick Street between George Street and Queens Street called the Stockpot.

I first was introduced to folk music there and there were often impromptu sessions there in 1964/65.

I can't remember if the coffee was any good though!"

Ray Melville, Rosyth, Fife, Scotland:  July 6, 2012

 

Recollections

39.

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young)

Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Thank you to Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young) for leaving this message in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

Avril wrote:

Café  Honeydew

"Does anyone remember the Café  Honeydew in West Maitland Street, on the right-hand side before you reached Haymarket?

It was our special Café , which we'd go to, when we were courting, for a special treat on Christmas Day.  We'd have a lovely Mixed Grill and then usually go to the Gaumont Cinema after the meal.

Happy Days!"

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young), Bendigo, Victoria, Australia
Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook, July 16, 2010

 

Recollections

40.

Sandy Cameron

Edinburgh

After sending me the photo of Lothian Road Café , which has provoked some interest with several replies to the EdinPhoto web site over the past week, Sandy Cameron writes:

More Café s

"Our recent correspondence about Café s has brought to mind another two that I used to frequent with my pal, John O'Rourke, in our teenage years in the 1960s.  They are:

The Elizabethan

"The Elizabethan was in Brougham Street.  We would go there for a coffee after a round of Pitch and Putt on Bruntsfield Links.  I remember having a crush on one of the waitresses!"

The Carolina

"The Carolina was in Bread Street, opposite St Cuthbert's store. The proprietor had quite a prominent nose, this was a source of amusement to John and me.

The Café , if i remember correctly, was formerly a shoe repair shop where the cobbler had his bench at the window and you could watch him at his work."

Sandy Cameron, Edinburgh:  July 17, 2012

 

Recollections

41.

Rosari Laughlin

(née Jeanette Rosari Durrell Nisbet)

Lake Charles, Louisiana, USA

Rosari Laughlin wrote:

Move to USA

"I attended All Saints' School then, from 1952, Boroughmuir School.  I married an American am now living in Lake Charles, Louisiana, USA, about four hours' drive from New Orleans.

Edinburgh Café s

"However, I still think of :

 Brattisani's chip shop

Francis Café  with Mrs Craigie who never smiled but made good eggs beans and chips and had all the latest music in the juke box."

Rosari Laughlin:  July 22, 2012

 

Recollections

42

Paul Sutherland

Glasgow, Scotland

Thank you to Paul Sutherland who wrote:

The Grail

George Street

"Does anybody remember anything about this cafe/bookshop on the first floor next door to the book publisher at 38 George Street?

I thought it was called 'The Grail' but this photo shows the name as 'Grail'.  It closed round about 1973.  It was a unique, amazing place."

1970

36 (The Grail) + 38 George Street

36 (The Grail) + 38 George Street, Edinburgh  -  1970

©  RCAHMS,   Photo 99972312  Scran 000-299-993-804-C        Photo 1970

 

 

My Experience of The Grail

"Those were the days when you had to walk more than ten yards to get a cup of coffee!

Below are extracts from a memoir piece that I wrote some years ago.  I'd be very interest to read any other people's memories of the Grail."

Memoir -  Paul Sutherland

 The Grail

Climbing the Stairs

"Climbing the stairs, you could smell coffee and quiche, then you became aware of sombre string quartet music, probably late Haydn or Beethoven, played not so loudly as to prevent conversation but loudly enough to be distinct from background music, allowing you either to talk or seriously listen."

Not Advertised

"Like a private gambling club in London’s Mayfair, it consciously didn’t advertise itself and in not doing so, did. The nature of it’s location meant that you had to be taken, formally introduced. You would never find it by accident unless you were in the habit of randomly exploring anonymous Edinburgh closes."

The Interior

"The front door, classically panelled and glossy white, opened on to rooms lined with bookshelves, an abundance of rush matting and hessian wallpaper, and that music.

You expected an ordinary New Town flat but got this: Miss Jean Brodie meets Woody Allen.  Over a mug of gritty coffee you could eavesdrop on complex locutions, arc-welded infinitives, the sort of unconscious academic fluency which in other places would turn heads and produce a stiffening of discomfort.

To me it would have seemed reasonable to have to take an IQ test to get in, people with Doctorates being excused. The chattering-class ambience was overpowering."

Conversation

"Occasionally, some confident, educated voice would rise over the background burble of conversation to then merge back into the intricacies of extended colloquy. Like a goldfish gasping on a flagstone I occasionally tried to join in, maybe to ask for a specific book.

I dropped in every Saturday, hoping that I might become clever by osmosis so that I could write like Clive James and use phrases like “teleological sophistry”.

I would buy a coffee. I would pick a book from the shelves and try to read it.  Once I found an extensive correction pencilled in the margin, tightly neat. It began: “Very true but....”

I don’t expect to meet that again - coffee shop regulars who feel qualified to annotate the specialist publications on sale."

The Grail was unique but even with the arrival of institutional coffee drinking, it would stand out from today’s sea of choice."

The Boss

"The boss, it seemed, was an Australian woman in her mid-to-late 50s. She was the brown smocks, Nehru collars, pewter crucifixes type.

I once asked her to read one of my schoolboy science fiction stories. They were the sort of half-baked literary acne that was squeezed out of many a sticky biro, as edifying as underpants.

To me they were strident and imperative.  Oh dear. She was as nice as she could have been.  Her eyes slid over the drivel and if there was an Oscar for under-acting, it would have been hers.

'Well,' she said, allowing herself to breath again, 'at least you can write.'  I've never been sure what she meant by that.  What I was perfectly sure of was that I just had to work there."

Work at The Grail

"To serve coffee at The Grail was a more exultant idea than anything else I could imagine, so I offered to help behind the coffee bar on Saturday mornings.

'Well,' she said again, 'we won't be able to pay you much.' I replied that I didn't mind.  I happened to be doing nothing else anyway."

First Day

"The Grail opened at 10.00 am on Saturdays and I turned up at 9.45 to find the door locked. I banged on it and there was no answer. I sat down on the stairs and eventually at 10.20, after sounds of scuffling and muttering from within, the door opened.

'Oh sorry - we had a bit of a party last night.'  Thanks for the invitation!  She had forgotten who I was but instead of saying to her: 'You've forgotten who am I, haven't you?' I just stood meekly in the corner.

The girl behind the food counter began clattering things around in an Edinburgh New Town, pinched, blue-stockinged sort of way.

Eventually I plucked up the courage to move in and join her, explaining who I was, but she barely acknowledged me, busy-busying herself, swooping around, grabbing coffee filters, slicing up the quiche."

The Coffee Machine

"She demonstrated the coffee machine as if her tana lawn smock was on fire. I hadn't understood her instructions and the machine started to make 'I'm going to explode' noises.  Boiling coffee was spurting everywhere.

From then on, I wasn't to serve food and I wasn't to handle money.  So all I could do was to collect dirty mugs.  It was a quiet morning.

Suddenly it was one o'clock and the Australian woman, dying to see the back of me, put a hand on my shoulder and said: 'That's fine, thanks very much.' Looking back, I know exactly what she meant.

Within minutes I was at the bus stop  having failed to be warmly welcomed into intellectual society.  It was raining,  I’ll never forget."

Paul Sutherland

Paul Sutherland, Glasgow, Scotland  July 26, 2012

 

Recollections

42.

Reply

1.

Keith Miller

Oban, Argyll & Bute, Scotland

Thank you to Keith Miller for replying to Paul Sutherland's Recollections 42 above

Keith wrote:

The Grail

George Street

"Paul Sutherland asks for a response from anyone with memories of The Grail in George Street.

I ‘hung out’ there for a few months in 1966-67, at the tail end of the mod interlude in youth culture.

There was a most unusual vibe there, with a confused mix of religion / intellectualism / folky / arty / etc.

It was rather too point-head for my taste, but it served good coffee and cakes and had unusual books and some great folk music evenings at weekends.

I remember some fine acoustic guitar work by a young man John(?) McInnes.  It was a formative interlude in the ricochets of my youth

Keith Miller, Oban, Argyll & Bute, Scotland: 19 February 2016 (2nd email)

 Recollections

43.

Sandy Sievwright

Penicuik, Midlothian, Scotland

Thank you to Sandy Sievwright who wrote:

Rellio's

Haymarket

After 'The Cavendish'

"After a good night at the upper floor of the Cavendish, dancing to the likes of Herman's Hermits and Engleheart Humperdinck, and finishing with songs like 'Please Stay', it was time to head down to Rellio's at Haymarket, opposite the Police Station."

Meals

"A mixed grill, a steak with all the trimmings or a nice trout were my favourites. The place was popular but never too busy. It was the highlight of our Saturday nights.

The Walk Home

"It was a late night in those days, with no night buses back to the sticks, so we simply walked back to Penicuik, some 10 or 12 miles away, and we never thought anything about it.

Sweet 1960s!."

Sandy Sievwright, Penicuik, Midlothian, Scotland:  August 11, 2012

 Recollections

44.

Sandy Sievwright

Penicuik, Midlothian, Scotland

Thank you to Sandy Sievwright for writing with memories of more restaurants in the centre of Edinburgh.

Sandy wrote:

Thistle Street

1966

Business Lunch

"In 1966, I worked in Dundas Street.  Then, it was called Pitt Street.  I often went out for what was referred to as a 'Business Lunch'

The places that I recall as being the cheapest were in Thistle Street.  They were next to each other, between Hanover Street and Frederick Street if my memory serves me.

The Thistle

"I believe that one  was called 'The Thistle'.  For two shillings*, a 3 course meal was offered - often a bowl of soup, meat and 2 veg and a sweet to finish off."

Tatler Restaurant

"There was another such place going up Dundas St on the left.  I think it was called 'The Tatler Restaurant'.  It was a little bit more upmarket, charging a half crown**  for their offerings. The sweet always seemed to be fresh fruit and ice cream."

Homely Food

"These places were always busy with good, honest, homely food and it was sometimes a struggle to get an empty table."

Sandy Sievwright, Penicuik, Midlothian, Scotland:  August 1, 2012

two shillings (2/-) = 10p

** half crown (2/6d) =12.5p

 

 Recollections

45

Peter Stubbs

Edinburgh

Sandy's comments in Recollections 44 above reminded me of the time when I first arrived in Edinburgh.

Standard Life

"I moved to Edinburgh in 1963, at the age of 18, to take up my first job, working for The Standard Life Assurance Company and studying for the Actuarial Exams in the evenings.

I lived in a hostel owned by the company with about fifteen others.  We were all studying for the exams.  The hostel was at 35 Inverleith Terrace.  It provided breakfast and an evening meal."

Woolworths

It was to be another couple of years before Standard Life opened its own restaurant so at lunchtime, about 12.30pm, I used to take a five minute walk from St Andrew Square to  Woolworths at the East End of Princes Street.  Their restaurant was on the second floor, above their shop.

I don't remember the exact prices they charged, but they were cheap.  I remember that for several weeks, one colleague had just had a bowl for his lunch.  It cost him 4 pence a day. ***   We both continued to work for Standard Life for the next 40 years!

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  August 18, 2012

*** four pence (4d) = about 1.5p

 

Recollections

46.

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young)

Bendigo, Victoria, Australia

Thank you to Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young) for posting a message in the EdinPhoto Guestbook after reading my Recollections 45 above.

Avril wrote:

St Andrew Square

"I also worked in St Andrew Square.  I worked at at the Scottish BUPA office which was then called the Scottish Nuffield.  It was a Private Health Insurance, which I thought was for only the wealthy back then.  Never did I think that one day BUPA would become our Private Health Insurer here in Australia!!

Gows Restaurant

Rose Street

"While working for Scottish Nuffield, we were given Lunch Vouchers.  I think they were worth about two shillings each, if my memory serves me correctly, for the restaurant in Rose Street called 'Gows'.

I wonder if anyone remembers 'Gows'.  They were very plain home-cooked meals, but they were nice.  One of them was small individual steak and kidney puddings, plain potatoes and peas, as an example but very tasty.

Maybe someone else will have visited it, even your good self."

Avril Finlayson Smith (née Young), Bendigo, Victoria, Australia
Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook, March 24, 2010

Reply to Avril

Luncheon Vouchers

Hi Avril:  I don't think I ever visited Gows in Rose Street, but I do remember fairly widespread use of Luncheon Vouchers that you mentioned, even though I was never issued with any.

They continued to be used for a long time after I first came across them in the 1960s.  I believe they offered a modest tax saving, but their nominal value hardly changed over the years as the price of meals went up with inflation.

Peter Stubbs:  August 19, 2012

Recollections

47.

Nan Scott (née Hay)

Pakenham, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Nan Scott replied to Avril Finlayson Smith's Recollections 46 above.

Nan wrote:

Luncheon Vouchers

"I've just been reading about Luncheon Vouchers.  I remember  them well.  I too used them.   Mine were for 2/6 when I worked for Thomas C. Gray, the Sheriff Officer.  I could use them in Patrick Thomsons, the big shop up the Bridges.

When I changed jobs a few years later. I got vouchers for 3 shillings and used them at the Chinese Restaurant at the West End called the Bamboo and also in the New Yorker.

If I didn't use the vouchers during the week, which I sometimes didn't, my husband and I used them in the Bamboo on a Saturday for lunch before we went to see Hibs playing, whether home or away  -  a great meal, and I didn't have to cook!"

Nan Scott (née Hay), Pakenham, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia:
Reply to Avril Finlayson Smith's message of Aug 19 2012  posted in EdinPhoto Guestbook, same day.

 Reply to Nan?

If you'd like to send a reply to Nan, please email me, then I'll pass on you message to her.

               Thank you

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  December 3, 2011

 

Recollections

48.

Iain Stewart

Barcelona, Spain

Thank you to Iain Stewart, Barcelona, Spain, for responding to Paul Sutherland's comments in Recollections 42 above.

Iain wrote:

The Grail

"The Grail  Cafe in George Street was a sort of an oxymoron.:

-   A ladies' ecumenical centre.

-   An organisation founded by a Jesuit.

It was famed for:

its filter coffee

its homemade cakes

its catholic (small c) record collection

-  Shubert's Trout

Beiderbecke

Songs for Swinging Sellers

etc.

-  great Christmas cards

cheap pressies for the girlfriend

-  the hand-picked lovelies from Craiglockhart who served the filter coffee in the brown pottery cups.

The Australian lady in charge was Norah."

Iain Stewart, Barcelona, Spain:  August 18, 2012

 

Recollections

49.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Allan Dodds has asked:

Chinese Restaurants

"Does anyone remember the two Chinese restaurants that opened in Hanover Street in the early-1960s

The Golden Gate

and

The Golden Palace.

They were on opposite sides of the road and were owned by the Sito brothers."

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  October 9, 2012

Allan added:

Question

Henderson's

"Am I right or am I wrong in believing that one of them became Henderson's vegetarian restaurant?

We used to play mah Yong with the waiters there after closing time and we were treated to numerous free meals as the management tried to attract customers by word of mouth."

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  October 9, 2012

 

Recollections

50.

Gordon Rule

Edinburgh

Here is a message from Gordon Rule about the Pied Piper Café.   I originally added this message to the web site as  'Recollections 115' on the Clubs and Discos page.

However, I've now decided that it is better included on this  Cafés and Restaurants page as Recollections 50, so that's what I've done

Gordon wrote:

Pied Piper Café

"I am amazed that after trawling through all the recollections of clubs and Cafés that I can find absolutely no mention of The Pied Piper Café which operated in the early-1960s and closed around 1965 to become a building society.

This was in Charlotte Street, very close to Princes street at the West End and was a hugely popular meeting place, mostly at the weekends, before going to parties and clubs, especially the Gamp and Place.

There was such a wide circle of  people from all walks  of life who met up there to socialise and enjoy themselves. As a testament to how popular  it was,  when it closed, it  still did not stop people meeting outside the Café with often some 50 or so, all congregating on the pavement.

This went on for about a year before it finally tailed off and people found other places to go.

I would be delighted to hear from anyone who used to frequent The Pied Piper."

Gordon Rule, Edinburgh:  April 13, 2011

 

Recollections

51.

Gail Pike

South Carolina, USA

Thank you to Gail Pike, South Carolina, USA for responding to Gordon Rule's 'Recollections 50' above.

Gail wrote:

Pied Piper Café

"I appreciated the comments and photo of the Pied Piper:

South Charlotte Street - The Pied Piper - Early-1960s ©

In 1965 my best friend and I took a shoestring tour of Europe and our first stop was Edinburgh. 

I remember the fab meal we had at Pied Piper, and it seems like I remember some stained glass or mosaic windows.  I'd love to have a picture of the inside of the Pied Piper, if anyone has one.

We stayed at the Learmonth Hotel - two 18 year olds from South Carolina"

Gail Pike, South Carolina, USA:  August 22, 2012

 

Recollections

52.

Bob Leslie

Glasgow, Scotland

Thank you to Bob Leslie for writing again with more recollections from the 1960s.

Bob wrote

Deep Sea Restaurant

"After hearing the bands at the Top Storey, at the top of Leith Street on a Sunday, we'd drop into the Deep Sea chippy for a fish supper - a damn good one too, as my taste buds recall!

There was a rumour that there was a house of ill repute above the Deep Sea to which admission was gained by murmuring 'Mars Bar' to the chippy proprietor. We never worked up the nerve to test this rumour!"

Bob Leslie, Glasgow, Scotland, October 20, 2012

 

Recollections

53.

Eileen Shay (née Byrne)

Florida, USA

Thank you to Eileen Shay for posting a message in the EdinPhoto guestbook.

Eileen wrote:

West End Café

"I went tother Palais de Dance on Saturday nights with my girlfriends and on Sundays went to the West End Cafe to hear the great bands.

Manhattan Café

"I also worked at the Manhattan Café where they had the best hamburgers I have ever tasted.  I wish I was still in Edinburgh, that wonderful city."

Eileen Shay (née Byrne), Florida, USA:  Message posted in EdinPhoto Guestbook, Oct 31, 2012

 

Recollections

54.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Alan Dodds has already sent me one of his photos of the exterior of La Fiesta Café  that he took in the 1960s.  See Recollections 32 above.

Exterior View

    La Fiesta Cafe  -  Exterior View ©

The large sign at the top of the central window on the left of this photo reads:  'La Fiesta

Now Allan has sent me a photo that he took, around 1960, inside the café.

Interior View

    La Fiesta Cafe  -  Interior View ©

Alan wrote:

Acknowledgement:  Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:  November 27, 2012

 

Recollections

55.

Ronnie Aitchison

Normanton, Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England

Thank you to Ronnie Aitchison who wrote:

The Manhattan

"I was curious if there was any information on the Manhattan on the EdinPhoto web site.  That's a cafe I visited many times in the later 1950s, learning to enjoy spaghetti Bolognese."

Coffee Joe's

"The Valentes family also opened another restaurant in Edinburgh.  It was Coffee Joe's in Forrest Road."

Rev Dr Ronnie Aitchison, Normanton, Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England:  December 16, 2012

Ronnie:

The Manhattan

Did you find the comments above about the Manhattan? 

Please see:

Recollections 2  (from Illinois, USA)

Recollections 3  (from Newcastle -upon-Tyne, England)

Recollections 26  (from Jamestown, California, USA)

Recollections 29  (from England)

Recollections 37  (from San Diego, California, USA) and

Recollections 53  (from Florida, USA).

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  December 19, 2012

 

Recollections

56.

David Bain

Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England

Thank you to David Bain who wrote:

The Bistro

Bruntsfield

"I haven't seen mention so far of The Bistro.  It was one of the row of shops beside the church in Bruntsfield Place.

I went there many times in the mid to late-1960s to enjoy a 'hamburger all the way'.   It was similar to the dressed up burgers served by today's fast-food emporia; the big difference being that it was delicious!"

David Bain, Rotherham, South Yorkshire, Edinburgh:  December 20, 2012

  Recollections

57.

Mal Acton

Liverpool, Lancashire, England

Thank you to Mal Acton who wrote

Waverley Steps Cafe

"I'm amazed that no-one has mentioned the cafe on Waverley Steps.

I remember going in there in the 1960s for a set 3-course (midday) dinner for about 4/- (20p now!).  It was always good value and always busy.  Does anyone remember it or know when it closed?"

Covenanters' Arms Pub

"Similarly, (though not a cafe) there was a very cosy pub on the Royal Mile called the Covenanters' Arms.  I went in there a few times for a meal and pint for under £5, about 10yrs ago.

Unfortunately it seems to have closed now. It was a very historic place with all kinds of memorabilia and I often wonder what happened to it."

Mal Acton, Liverpool, Lancashire, England:  January 4, 2015

  Recollections

58.

Paula Hogan (née Brine)

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Thank you to Paula Hogan who wrote

The Laigh Coffee House

"I lived in Edinburgh in the 1960s for about ten years, and loved it there.

Does anyone remember the Laigh Coffee House on Hanover Street?  

A group of us used to hang out there:

-  Pamela Brine

-  Paula Brine

-  Do Evans

-  Mo Evans

-  others."

Paula Hogan (née Brine), Toronto, Ontario, Canada:  September 20, 013

  Recollections

59.

Peter Stubbs

Edinburgh

The Laigh Coffee House

"Hi Paula:

Thanks for your Recollections 58 above.

Yes I remember 'The Laigh Coffee House'.

Edinburgh

I moved from Yorkshire to Edinburgh on leaving school in 1963.  (In fact, it was 50 years ago today that I arrived in Edinburgh!)  I enjoyed life here and am still living in Edinburgh now.  I remember visiting 'The Laigh' for coffee and scones most Saturday mornings around 1970.

Those were the days before there was a coffee house on just about every street corner in the centre of Edinburgh.

Open Fire

I found 'The Laigh' to be very welcoming.  It was in a basement, a few steps down from Hanover Street, between Thistle Street and Queen Street, with several small inter-connected rooms and a variety of seating.  We used to try to get a seat beside the open fire on a cold winter's morning.

I remember there being a large table in the room with the open fire, often occupied by a group having a lively conversation about music and the theatre."

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  September 22, 2013

  Recollections

60.

Paula Hogan (née Brine)

Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Thank you to Paula Hogan who wrote again.

Paula wrote:

Edinburgh in 1960s

"My dad had a business, W I Brine & Sons, a furniture veneer company in Edinburgh.  I have great memories of Edinburgh in the 1960s.  I shared a flat there with several girls and had so much fun, chumming around with Dorag and Mo Evans and my sister Pam."

Henderson's Cafe

"I remember the Henderson boys and their cafe."

The Laigh

The Laigh Coffee House, owned by an actor whose name escapes me at the moment, was our meeting place.  We all used to meet there!"

Paula Hogan (née Brine), Toronto, Ontario, Canada:  September 22, 2013
Paula emigrated from Edinburgh to Canada in 1967.

 

Recollections

60

Reply

1.

Paul Sutherland

Glasgow, Scotland

Thank you to Paul Sutherland for replying to  Recollections 60 above.

Paula wrote:

The Laigh Bakehouse

"The Laigh Bakehouse was owned and run by the actor, Moultrie Kelsall."

Paul Sutherland, Glasgow, Scotland 1 January 2017

Moultrie Kelsall

*** This Wikipedia page tell the story of the film and TV character actor, Moultrie Kelsall, and his career.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  2 January 2017

 

Recollections

61.

Ian McArthur

Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Others have already written about about Coffee Joe's and Sandy Bell's Bar.

Now Ian McArthur adds:

Coffee Joe's

Part time Job

"Shortly before I left Secondary school in 1971, I had the good fortune to get a part-time job working at Coffee Joe's on a Sunday and Friday nights.

Pizza Maker

"Initially, I waited on tables but after a while my friend, Kenny Smyth, who worked as the Pizza Maker at the weekend, was given a full time Job as Trainee Chef/Cook.  This left a spot for Pizza Make at the weekends.

He suggested I go for it but it was a bit daunting as you had to make the Pizzas in full view of the general public, as they had this large square window showing the oven and all the round circular trays stacked high and all the takeaway boxes stacked to the ceiling.

You had to toss the dough in the air and then place on tray once the correct size had been achieved. ,Kenny made it look so easy as he had been doing it for some time.  However, after a few days of practice downstairs out of sight from the public, I got the hang of it.

I started on the Friday night and was still working long after midnight, then it was repeated on Saturday night and again on a Sunday lunchtime and a short session until 10pm on a Sunday evening.  It was good fun and wasn't really like work.  You were so busy that the time just flew by.

Kenny Smyth

"My mate, Kenny, went on to become a first class Chef De Parte working all over the world including France, Switzerland, Austria and Italy, before setting up his own restaurant in Guernsey (Channel Islands). I'm not sure where he is now if anybody does know where he is or has a contact address shoot me an email."

Sandy Bell's

My Dad

"I also remember Sandy Bell's or Forrest Hill Bar as it was known then.  I remember going in to look for my dad.  Mum had sent me out to find him on the odd occasion of a Friday night.

I had a few pubs to go to and would go to them in the order that he would visit them.

-  He would start in The Woolpack with his mates from work, just down from St. Francis' church on Bristo Street.

-  Then he'd go to the Territorial Bar.

-  Then, he'd go to Sandy Bell's.

-  On the very odd occasion he'd then make it to the pub that was opposite the library on George IV Bridge.  Maybe someone can remind me of the name of it.

-  Finally, he'd come home to Mum and us in Victoria Street.

Smoke

"At Sandy Bell's, you'd open the door and this thick grey/blue pool of smoke would envelope you as you let some fresh air in.

 Most men, back then, smoked, and the Pub would usually be packed on a Friday night with men finished work for the day and 'chewing the fat'* until about 9.30 or 10pm.

Then, the students would 'rock up'** for the last 30 mins or so, then they would be off to whatever party was on."

Ian McArthur, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia:  October 19, 2013

   *  = talking socially without exchanging too much information.

 **  = arrive without any prior planning

 

Recollections

62.

Stuart Lyon

Blackford, Edinburgh

Thank you to Stuart Lyon for replying to the paragraph titled 'My Dad' in Recollections 61 above

Stuart wrote:

Reply

George IV Bridge

Pub Opposite the Library

"There were 2 bars opposite the Central Library (actually slightly south of it).  They were at  at Nos 49-51 and No 54., George IV Bridge.

-  The former has been known as O'Connels, Bridge Bar and Scruffy Murphy's and more recently the Villager.

-  The latter is now Bar Khol but was the the Royal George Bar and The Quill."

Stuart Lyon, Blackford, Edinburgh:  October 22, 2013

 

Recollections

63.

Wim van der Hoek

Sint Anthonis, Netherlands

Thank you to Wim van der Hoek, Netherlands, who wrote:

Crawford's Tea Rooms

Question

Near Princes Street, Edinburgh

"Does anybody have a photograph of one of the Crawford's Tea Rooms in Central Edinburg, or know where they were situated?  I believe that there was a Crawford's Tea Room in one of the side streets off Princes  Street in the 1960s.

Our Visits to Edinburgh in 1960s

"My brother and I were both born in Holland, but in the 1960s our father had to go to Scotland to work for Philips in Hamilton (1966-1969)."

Accident

"During that period, I remember visiting Edinburgh once and having lunch or tea at Crawford's when my brother fell into a small pond inside the shop (which I believe had two floors).

The reason why he fell in was that the pond was filled with coins on the bottom and he was/is mad about shiny things (like money)!

He was completely soaked but it was no trouble at all to the ladies from Crawford's.  They took him away and told us to come back in half an hour  -  and 'voila! He was completely dry again,'  I expect they had run him through a spin dryer or something!"

Crawford's Bankruptcy

"A search on the Internet found that the Crawford Bakery company went bankrupt half-way through the 1990s, so trying to find the actual shop on Google Street View now would be useless.

Wim van der Hoek, Sint Anthonis, Netherlands:  October 28 2013

 

Recollections

63.

Reply

1.

Peter Stubbs

Edinburgh

Crawford's Tea Rooms

Near Princes Street, Edinburgh

"Hi Wim.  Unfortunately, I don't have any photos of  the Crawfords' Tea Rooms in Central Edinburgh (either the inside or the outside views).

However, I've checked the Edinburgh & Leith Post Office Directory for 1961 and found that there were Crawford's Tea Rooms near Princes Street at:

-  31 Frederick Street, and

-  15-19 Hanover Street.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  November 9, 2013

Photos

Reply to Wim?

If you know of any photos of Crawford's Tea Rooms in Edinburgh, taken around the 1960s, please email me, then I'll pass on Wim's email address to you, then you will be able to send an email direct to Wim. 

    Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  November 9, 2013

 

Recollections

64.

Adrian Coppola

Thank you to Adrian Coppola who wrote:

Barbecue

and

Pied Piper

"Just out of interest, the Barbecue and Pied Piper restaurants were owned by my father, Claude Coppola and his business partner, Eddie Crolla.

Barbecue

    Barbecue Grill & Restaurant at Lauriston Place  - 1954 ©

Pied Piper

    South Charlotte Street - The Pied Piper - Early-1960s ©

It's nice to see that people still remember both restaurants fondly."

Adrian Coppola:  December 24, 2013 

 

Recollections

65.

Mike Borys

Edinburgh

Thank you to Mike Borys for sending me these memories of an Edinburgh cafes, amongst the Edinburgh Clubs and Discos, Recollections 187 that he sent to me.

Mike wrote:

'The Bandura' Cafe

"In the 60's and 70's my mum and dad used to own and run a wee cafe in Dalry Road called 'The Bandura'.  Many of the bands came to the place as it stayed open till 3 o'clock in the morning.

My mother has memories of:

-  Ra Rollers

-  The Stones

-  Writing on the Wall

-  This and That going there.

It was one of two caffs that stayed open late.  The other was 'The Metropole', opposite the Police Station in Torphichen Place.  There were no MacD's or Kentucky Fried Hen in those days!"

We had a regular spot at the Heriot Watt Union.  Great times were had by all!  I'm still alive and still biking."

Mike Borys, Edinburgh:  August 17, 2013  (3 emails)

 

Recollections

66.

Mike Borys

Edinburgh

Here are more memories of an Edinburgh cafe sent to me by Mike Borys, amongst his Edinburgh Clubs & Discos Recollections 188 that he sent to me.

Mike wrote:

Cafes

"I think that the cafe in Lothian Road was called Mr Smith's,  and there  was another cafe up some stairs in Rose Street North Lane.  It was frequented by school kids who wanted to have a coffee and a 'fly fag'.  I can't remember its name.

Mike Borys, Edinburgh:  August 18, 2013)

 

Recollections

67.

Alison Boocock

Edinburgh

Thank you to Alison Boocock who read read Mike Borys' Recollections 65 above and replied:

The Bandura' Cafe

"In his Recollections 65 above, Mike Borys mentions The Bandura cafe/restaurant.  Oh how I remember it well.  I loved it!

My mother, Alice, worked as a waitress in the Bandura for quite a number of years and I knew Mr & Mrs Borys very well. 

My sister and I had a turn in waitressing in the Bandura once or twice.  It made great food and the most fabulous curries."

Mrs Borys

"I even worked in Mrs Borys' dress shop in Morningside when she first opened it.

The last time my mum, who is dead now, and I visited Mrs Borys, she lived somewhere on main road up Oxgangs Road way.  I would love to see his Mum again if she is still alive."

Alison Boocock (maiden name was Welsh), Edinburgh:  January 27, 2014

I've now passed the latest email address that I have for Mike Borys to Alison Boocock, and hope that  Alison will be able to make contact with Mike.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  January 27, 2014

 

Recollections

68.

Alison Boocock  (née Welsh)

Edinburgh

Thank you to Alison Boocock for sending another email to me.

Alison wrote

The Bandura' Cafe

"The Bandura Cafe was famous for its food.  People would queue up along Dalry Road to get in!

There were lots of 'famous folk' who ate there.  My mum would tell me about many of the 'laddies from those pop bands' who used to frequent it regularly. It wasn't until many years later we began to recognise who those 'laddies' and famous folk were!"

Alison Boocock (née Welsh), Edinburgh:  January 28, 2014

 

Recollections

69.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England
[writing from Barbados]

Thank you to Allan Dodds who wrote:

Goldenacre Cafe

"Does anyone remember the Goldenacre Cafe in Inverleith Row?  It was run by Hilda, a German lady, and her husband (George?).

They had a jukebox on which we used to play Buddy Holly and Eddie Cochrane records. The Goldenacre set were quite civilized by the standards of the day."

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England (writing from Barbados):  February 9, 2014

 

Recollections

69.

Reply

1.

Mike Crean

Dorking, Surrey, England

Thank you to Mike Crean for sending this reply to the recollections left by Allan Dodds above.

Mike wrote:

Goldenacre Cafe

"I remember the cafe at Goldenacre very well. It was owned by Hilda and George Robertson. It was mainly run by Hilda, as George was a marine officer and was frequently away at sea."

Beat Group

"Hilda and George had a son John who had began to play the drums. Hilda and George decided to build a beat group around John and recruited a number of players. They advertised for a rhythm guitarist in the Edinburgh Evening News in February 1964"

I had recently learned rock guitar and applied for the gig. I went round to the Robertson house, which was a ground floor flat in Goldenacre Terrace, for the audition."

I had quite good equipment for those days - a Hofner Colorama Guitar and a Vox AC15 amp.  So whether it was good playing - or my fancy gear - I got the place in the band."

Practise

"We used to practise in the front room of the flat, which was right on the corner at the traffic lights. Our efforts could clearly be heard outside, much to the amusement and no doubt displeasure of passers by, buses and taxis, etc.

We also used to practise in the basement of the Goldenacre Cafe and Hilda also used to let us have little session nights for the regular customers."

Juke Box

"As Allan says it was a really nice little cafe, and Hilda certainly had a great juke box with lots of brilliant records."

The K'Neins

Unfortunately, she could be a bit domineering and insisted on calling our band 'The K'Neins'. It was obviously of German origin.

"However, the other band members never figured out what this meant or why she wanted it. We hated the name and were frankly embarrassed by it !

Sadly things did not progress well.  We did not really rate John as much of a drummer and the relationship with Hilda steadily declined.

We finally split with the Robertsons one Saturday afternoon around June 1964. A very acrimonious split unfortunately!  Hilda angrily threw us all out of the flat - and what equipment belonged to us, she and John dumped on the pavement outside.

I had no further contact with the family after that and never saw them again."

The Partisans

Our group continued with a new drummer and we became quite successful over the next few years.  Our name was changed to 'The Partisans' and we were joined by:

 Jimmy Cruickshanks from 'The Embers' and
-   Kenny Charleson from
'The Avengers' -  as joint singers.

We were regulars at The Gamp, The 'Nash and other top venues in Edinburgh.

When back in Edinburgh, I often pass the ground floor flat in Goldenacre Terrace and the cafe round the corner. Although it's now exactly 50 years ago, I can still vividly recall it all.

Great memories!"

Mike Crean, Dorking, Surrey, England:  February 10, 2014

 

Recollections

69.

Reply

2.

Allan Dodds

Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England

Allan Dodds (who wrote Recollections 69 above)  added:

Goldenacre Cafe

The K Nines

"The group called 'K Nines', mentioned by Mike Crean above was probably one of Hilda's jokes.  (K Nines = canines = dogs.)"

Allan Dodds, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire, England:    Feb 2014 (from Barbados) + Mar 14, 2014

Doctor Who

K9

It sounds as if Hilda got her idea over a decade before the BBC.

The metal dog 'K9' did not appear in Doctor Who until 1977.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  March 16, 2014

 

Recollections

70.

Alan Grieve

Minehead, Somerset, England

Thank you to Alan Grieve who wrote:

Royal Mile Cafe"

"During the late 1950s or early-1960s we used to go a small cafe, which I think was called The Royal Mile Cafe, on Sunday afternoons. 

A Trad Jazz  band often played there, but we never knew if they would be there or not!

It was a small cafe and there was a balcony from which we could watch the band.  If they weren't there we just had a quick coffee and left!

I think it was on the north side of the road, up the hill from Cockburn Street, but after all these years it's difficult to remember.  It was always fairly quiet.  I wonder if anyone else remembers it."

Alan Grieve, Minehead, Somerset, England:  February 9, 2014

Replies

Please email me to let me know if you remember this cafe.  Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  February 13, 2014

 

Recollections

70.

Reply

1.

Phil Wilson

Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Thank you to Phil Wilson for responding to the comments above.

Phil wrote:

Royal Mile Cafe"

"I saw Recollections 70 of the 'Royal Mile Cafe' on your pages tonight.

I've added a photo that I took of the cafe, late in the day in 1979, to this page on the  ipernity web site.

I never went upstairs in the cafe, which is presumably where the music was played in the days that Alan Grieve remembers."

Phil Wilson, Aberdeen, Aberdeenshire, Scotland (who now has a bus pass!)  February 14, 2014

 

Recollections

70.

Reply

2.

James A Rafferty

Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland

Thank you to James A Rafferty for also replying to Allan Dodds' comments in Recollections 70 above.

James wrote:

Royal Mile Cafe"

"I believe the cafe Alan Grieve is referring to was opposite St Giles' Cathedral, near to Advocates Close.  They used to have a band playing on Sundays.".

James A Rafferty, Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland:  February 14, 2014

 

Recollections

70.

Reply

3.

Brian (JB)

near Edinburgh

Thank you to Brian (JB) who wrote:

"You asked if anybody remembered the 'Royal Mile Cafe'. I certainly do!

Scones and Coffee
after the Court Cases

As a young reporter (aged 18) on the Evening News we used to have coffee and scones upstairs there nearly every day, served by the owner, Sandy (surname forgotten), said to be a Moral Rearmament supporter, after we'd been sitting in to report on cases in:

-  Edinburgh Burgh Court, later the District Court, located at the Police headquarters in Parliament Square, or

-  Edinburgh Sheriff Court, further up the Royal Mile.

Other Reporters

My better known colleague:

-   the late George Hume, 'Evening Times' and 'BBC TV',

along with reporters from

-  the 'Daily Express' whose offices were close by and

-  the 'Evening Dispatch'

were all regulars.”

We’d sit there to enjoy the freshly made scones with butter and newly brewed coffee, whilst deciding which cases to write up for our papers.”

Brian (JB), near Edinburgh:  April 27, 2014

 

Recollections

71.

Andrew McFadden (Flash)

Inverness, Inverness-shire, Scotland

Thank you to Andrew McFadden who wrote:

The Hideaway Cafe

"I wonder if anyone remembers The Hideaway Cafe, on the corner of York Place and North St Andrew Street.  It was great for the Rockers of Edinburgh in the 1960s".

Andrew McFadden (Flash). Inverness, Inverness-shire, England:  March 7, 2014

 

Recollections

72.

Lorna McKay

Thank you to Lorna McKay who wrote:

Fairley's Restaurant

and

The Beehive Restaurant

"I've just come across these pages on the EdinPhoto web site:

Fairley's Restaurant and Ballroom, Leith Street

The Beehive Restaurant and Pub, Grassmarket

The Beehive Restaurant and Pub, Photo of Staff

Unbelievable! I've just cleaned up my silver teapot from Fairley's Restaurant, Leith Street to put a pic on Twitter in the hope that it might be of might interest to someone."

Fairley's
Ballroom

"Fairleys was owned by my Great Grandparents.

- My Great Grandmother (Jane Fairley, née Alexander) was the driving force behind it.

-  My Great Grandfather was  a lovely, quietish man

The comments  on the web site about a few kafuffles there, when the sailors arrived, are probably correct.  It was a tough place, but had a very fine dance hall."

Fairley's Ballroom

Victoria Hall - 83 Leith Street ©

Fairley's
Restaurant

"Fairley's was a well respected restaurant.  I have some lovely silver teapots, coffee pots and sugar bowls from the restaurant with 'Fairleys' inscribed on them.

-  My mum tells me that Granny (Jane Fairley's daughter) told her that on a New Year's Day, people would travel from afar, e.g. the Borders, and queue up at Fairleys to get in for lunch.

-  My Dad told me that Fairleys played a large part in feeding the troops during the war. They catered and fed many of the 3000 troops in Edinburgh during the war that had to be fed every day. The food was prepared at the restaurant then transported by lorry from the foot of Leith Street to Dreghorn and Redford Barracks."

The Alexander Family

Driver and Pilot

"We believe that Jane Fairley was the first woman to get a driving licence in Edinburgh and also the first woman to hold a pilot's licence.

That doesn't surprise me, as she was the daughter of James Alexander of Edinburgh, founder of Alexander's car delers in Semple Street, one of the main Ford dealers in the UK.  I think the family also had an Alexander's in Glasgow."

Ben Nevis

"My great great uncle was the first man to drive up Ben Nevis in a Model T Ford.  He still holds the record.

Motor Cycles and Planes

The Alexanders family were great motorbike fanatics.  My brothers are both 'off-road' fanatics, and we all like bikes and planes!"

My Dad has restored many beautiful vintage bikes and built two aeroplanes.  He sold the first one and still flies his 'Mark 2' plane.

My Dad is a genius and a very wonderful man.  I've never met anyone like him.  On VE day he and his brothers cycled along Princes Street,  much to the amazement of American and British soldiers, on a  bicycle made for 3 that had been found in a basement, very rusty,  and refurbished at Alexander's.

Sadly, I don't know where the 'Ben Nevis car' and the 'bicycle for 3' are now. "

The Beehive
Restaurant

"My Great Uncle Arthur, the brother of my Granny, Jane Fairley owned 'The Beehive' in the Grassmarket.

-  I was amazed to see this Beehive menu from 1950 on the EdinPhoto web site.  How wonderful that the gentleman kept it!

Beehive Menu - 1950

Menu from the Beehive InnRestaurant  -  1950 ©

-  It was good to also find this 1950s photo of Beehive Staff on the web site.  It includes my Great Uncle Harry who went to New Zealand. 

Beehive Staff - 1950s

Staff at Beehive Inn Restaurant, 1950s ©

It's sad that my Granny and her brothers Arthur and Harry have all gone now."

 -  My Dad and his friend brought the 'condemned prison door' from the prison to the pub.  There's also a well in the bar downstairs.

They were a fascinating family."

Lorna McKay:  May 3+4+16 +21, 2014

Recollections

73

Ian Smith

Ayr, Ayrshire, Scotland

Thank you to Ian Smith who wrote about his involvement with 'Memphis Road Show' and other musicians in the mid-1960s, and added:

The Deep Sea

"If we were doing Friscos, I would pick up Jonny Croalla from the old 'Deep Sea' chippy. This was amongst group of tenements up and across from Playhouse.  There used to be Taxi Rank and Police Box nearby.

The 'Deep Sea' stayed opened until 3am on Friday / Saturday.  You bought a fish supper from them, then ran down Leith Walk and bought 6 burnt rolls from baker on left hand side."

Ian Smith, Ayr, Ayrshire, Scotland:  October 15, 2014

Recollections

74

Margaret Inglis

Thank you to Margaret Inglis who wrote

Larry's Café

"Does anyone remember Larry's cafe in Nicholson Street in the 1950s?  It was up 3 steps, next door to the Music Shop which was next door to Rankins Fruit Shop."

The National Restaurant

"Above it was The National Restaurant where my mum worked in the kitchen and every Friday.  I was allowed lunch there which consisted of the best Tattie Soup followed by Syrup Sponge & Custard.  It was the highlight of my week!"

Margaret Inglis:  January 13, 2015

 

Recollections

75.

Eric Gold

East London

Thank you to Eric Gold who wrote:

Lothian Road and Bread Street Cafés

    Lothian Road -  Cafe opposite the Usher Hall  -  Photo probably taken in the 1980s ©

"The Lothian Road café was a great wee café, as was the one in Bread Street, nearly opposite the Burke & Hare Pub, now a lap dancing joint.  I can still taste the food.  The well fired rolls with egg and bacon were lovely."

Other Edinburgh Cafés

"My favourite cafés in Edinburgh were:

 Larry’s Café in Surgeon Hall (a shrine to my family and all the residents of the Dumbiedykes).

Dante Lane’s in Bristow Street (my Godfather).

Maggie’s Café in Edina Place off Easter Road.

-  A wee café in Leith called Café Helena, a great wee place.  I think it was in Henderson Street in Leith."

Eric Gold, East London, England:  11 September 2015

Lothian Road Café

More memories of the café in Lothian Road that Eric mentions above can be found on this Lothian Road Recollections page.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh,  12 September 2015

 

Recollections

76.

Eric Gold

East London

Thank you to Eric Gold for writing again.

Eric wrote:

Cappola's Café

"In my Recollections 75 above, I forgot one café  -   Capolla’s in the Dumbiedykes Road, just around the corner from Arthur Street.  It was owned by Mrs Capolla, a good friend of our family.  She sold good food.

It was a popular place for coffee for the people in Dumbiedykes area.  It was a shrine to the people of Arthur Street and to my family.  Mrs Capolla used to give me a big piece of chocolate!"

Frank Capolla

"Mrs Capolla's son, Frank, worked for the Edinburgh trams.   One day, I got a lift on his tram and, as the tram turned the corner into Princes Street at the old Post Office, I fell off my seat.  Frankie just grabbed me, to stop me falling off the tram or hurting myself inside his tram."

Eric Gold, East London, England:  13+15 September 2015

 

Recollections

77.

Terry Bayles

Thank you to Terry Bayles for replying to Jim Cairns' Recollections 12 above about 'The Hungry i'

Terry wrote:

The Hungry i

"I was at Daniel Stewarts ain the early-1960s.   We used to go to 'The Hungry i' after school, to hang out there with a coffee.  It felt pretty cool at the time."

Terry Bayles:  6 January 2016

Recollections

78.

George Roy

Beijing and Hong Kong

Thank you to Gorge Roy who wrote:

'The  Quick and Twenty'

Restaurant above Crawford's

South Charlotte Street

"Does anyone remember the 'Quick and Twenty' restaurant?  It was a small restaurant that used to be on the first floor, above Crawford's, in South Charlotte Street.

I used to go there with my mother in the late-[1960s for a meal after Saturday afternoon shopping.  It was hard to find, but very welcoming, with a sort of bar where the meals were prepared and a long row of tables facing.

Incredibly, I still remember the names of the waitresses.   There were Betty and Helen, whom I guess were in their 40s and also Lorraine, who I was in her early-20s back then.

It was the sort of simple place that just doesn't exist any more, but I still think back to those meals with a lot of nostalgia."

George Roy, Beijing, China and Hong Kong:  10 +14 March 2016

Recollections

79.

Keith Miller

Oban, Argyll & Bute, Scotland

Thank you to Keith Miller who wrote

Forest Road

"I see that there are already a number of references above toto

The Barbeque and

Sandy Bell's

 in Forrest Road, but in the 1960s, Forrest Road had a number of other cafes:

DeMarco's, beside Bedlam

Lannie's, beside Oddfellows Hall,

Willy Wozniac's, next to Sandy Bells."

 DeMarco's

"DeMarco's was extraordinary – they did a chip shop takeaway sideline from a side door leading directly into the kitchens.

It was a real Dante's Inferno, with flames exploding from frying pans and over-excited Italian cooks squabbling with Matriarch Mrs DeMarco as she wrapped the chips (in newspaper) and dinged the till.  Kitchen Chaos for sure.

It later became quite a good Indian restaurant."

Lannie's

"Lannie's was a much more refined fish and chip café.  I ate my lunch there daily for years."

 Willy Wozniac's

"Willy's was just a row of bench seats and half a dozen tables, but always busy with all sorts.

Keith Miller, Oban, Argyll & Bute, Scotland: 19 February 2016

  

Recollections

80.

Keith Miller

Oban, Argyll & Bute, Scotland

Following up the comments in his Recollections 79 above, Keith Miller wrote:

Forest Road Area

"The Forrest Road area of Edinburgh had such a wealth of eateries back in the 1960sd:

early Indian restaurants

Italian joints

cafes with varying pretensions of sophistication

chip shops

pie places

all abuzz with the vibrancy of the brave new world of 1960s mod culture.  They have all gone now into the swirling mists of time, eh?"

Keith Miller, Oban, Argyll & Bute, Scotland: 19 February 2016

 

Recollections

81.

Norman Smith

Halifax, West Yorkshire, England

Thank you to Norman Smith who wrote:

The Laigh

"The Laigh was a wonderful place, especially during the Festival.  We had late night porridge, topped with whisky on occasions.

If Moultrie liked you, he would give you a key to the Bakehouse, run by Nan.  We had lunches at a common table, tuna mayonnaise salads and shortbread.  We always picked up fresh bread for the weekend.

Frances, my wife, and I always loved it!"

Norman Smith,  Halifax, West Yorkshire, England:   24 January 2017

 

Recollections

82.

Norman Smith

Halifax, West Yorkshire, England

Thank you to Norman Smith for writing again.  Norman wrote:

The Laigh

Shortcake

"The Laigh's  shortbread was quite famous amongst Edinburgh shortcake aficionados.  It was reckoned to be the best you could get.  It is mentioned on various websites if you Google Laigh coffee house.

I seem to remember that it was made by Nan who ran the Laigh bakehouse just down the street from the coffee house. It opened at lunch-times on weekdays and admission was restricted to key holders as mentioned in my Recollections 81 above.

The shortbread was apparently so famous that it would be sent to President Kennedy in the diplomatic bag  -  or so it was rumoured."

Norman Smith,  Halifax, West Yorkshire, England:   26 January 2017

 

Recollections

83.

Colin Kelly

Wellington, New Zealand

Thank you to Colin Kelly who wrote:

Crawford's Cafe

The Royal Mile

"I worked at Crawford's  Cafe in the Royal Mile, around 1975-76. The cafe was definitely on High street.  It was not one of the two  mentioned in Reply 1 to Recollections 63 above.

The cafe had a basement downstairs, which was used as overflow for customers during the Festival.

I distinctly remember that on the wall downstairs there was a plaque, stating that in this room, conspirators had gathered in ancient times, to decide something important  – possibly sign a declaration of some sort.

Question

I’m curious to discover what that was.  Does anyone recognize this building or know what event was being recognised on the plaque?

Brewery

I also remember the overwhelming and wonderful smell of beer being malted wafting frequently in  the street.  I never saw a brewery though.  It was a wonderful area to work.

Colin Kelly, Wellington, New Zealand: 19 February 2017

Reply to Colin?

If you can answer the question that Colin asks above, please email me to let me know, then I'll pass on his email address to you.

Incidentally, there were large breweries at Holyrood, at the foot of the Royal Mile.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh: 19 February 2017

 

Recollections

84.

Stuart Lyon

Blackford, Edinburgh

Stuart Lyon has asked:

Question

Black & White Café

"Can anyone remember a place in either Hanover Street or Frederick Street (between George Street and Queen Street) around 1980/81 which was, I think, black and white checked outside?

Food was burgers, hickory ribs, chicken wings etc.

They used to hand out vouchers in the street which gave you 'buy one meal get the second free' on Thursday nights.

The interior decor was also black and white.

It wasn’t Garfunkels!"

Stuart Lyon, Blackford, Edinburgh:  February 20, 2016

Reply to Stuart?

If you'd like to send a reply to Stuart in response to his question above, please email me to let me know, then I'll pass his email address to you so that you can contact him.

Stuart Lyon, Blackford, Edinburgh:  February 20, 2017

 

Recollections

84.

Reply

1.

Simon Capaldi

Thank you to Simon Capaldi for sending me this reply, about an hour after I posted Stuart Lyon's question above.

Simon wrote:

Reply

Juicy Lucy's

"I believe that the black and white cafe was called Juicy Lucy's.  It was on the western side of Hanover Street.

It later became The Marie Rose in the early-1980s."

Simon Capaldi:  February 20, 2017

 

Recollections

84.

Reply

2.

Stuart Lyon

Blackford, Edinburgh

Thank you to Stuart Lyon for writing again.

Stuart wrote:

Reply

Juicy Lucy's?

"It was fantastic to get a reply so quickly but, unfortunately, the person I was trying to get the answer for tells me that the cafe they were asking about wasn’t Juicy Lucy’s!"

Stuart Lyon, Blackford, Edinburgh:  February 21, 2017

 

Recollections

84.

Reply

3.

Stuart Lyon

Blackford, Edinburgh

Thank you to Stuart Lyon for writing with further information to help track down the name of the black and white restaurant in Hanover Street or Frederick Street.

Stuart wrote:

Reply

Black & White Café

Name and Location

"The couple who asked me about this café are a bit vague as to the location:

-  They say that it was definitely in Frederick Street or Hanover Street.

-  The Wife is adamant it was in the section between Rose Street and George Street. Although I think she is probably right, I have a wee niggle it was the section between George Street and Queen Street.

-  I have no doubt at all that it was on the right hand side going up from Princes Street.

-  The food served there was ribs, chicken wings, maybe steaks, coleslaw etc. - a sort of American diner-style food. She thinks it may have had  an American type name -  Brooklyns?, that sort of thing.

- I  veer towards a shorter one word name like Aztecs?

-  Decor was definitely black and white.

-  The entrance was a wee step up, then there was a door at an angle.

-   When we were in Edinburgh in January we had a look at all the places in the Frederick Street and Hanover Street. We definitely saw one place that had an angled door

I'll go to Edinburgh Central Library in the morning and look at their copies of the Edinburgh & Leith Post Office Directories for the timeframe we are interested in, the early 1980s.

As you say the more brains that look at this then the more hopeful we can expect to be in pinning down the name and location of this mystery establishment."

Stuart Lyon, Blackford, Edinburgh:  February 21, 2017

 

Recollections

84.

Reply

4.

Stuart Lyon

Blackford, Edinburgh

Thank you to Stuart Lyon for writing again, after visiting Edinburgh Central Library today in search of the name and location of the black and white café.

Stuart wrote:

Reply

Black & White Café

Name and Location

" I've just been down to the Edinburgh Room at Central Library on George IV Bridge. I had hoped to view some Post Office Street Directories for the early 1980s but sadly they were only published up to 1975.

The very helpful assistant did say that the Library had BT yellow pages for the period.  I looked at Cafes/Diners (none) and Restaurants in Frederick and  Hanover Streets in the Yellow Pages for 1979,1980, 1982 and 1983"

The Allegro

Hanover Street

"The only restaurant that I found that perhaps fits the bill was the Allegro at Hanover Street at an address it shared with 'The Three Tuns'.

If it shared the address with 'The Three Tuns', it may very well have had an angled separate entrance ,ut I have no evidence that it did have.

 The other problem is that not all restaurants etc were listed in the Yellow Pages.

So does the Allegro ring any bells for anybody?    I hope so!"

Stuart Lyon, Blackford, Edinburgh:  February 22, 2017

Any Further Comments?

If you remember a black and white restaurant, in Frederick Street or Hanover Street in the early-1980s,

... or if you remember remember 'The Allegro',

...  or if you'd like to contribute any other comments to this debate,

please email your comments to me, then I'll add them to this page on the EdinPhoto web site.

                   Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  February 22, 2017

 

Recollections

84.

Reply

5.

Stuart Lyon

Blackford, Edinburgh

Stuart Lyon added:

Reply

New York, New York

Hanover Street

"A friend came up with the name 'New York, New York' for this restaurant.  The couple who were trying to find the name are 90% convinced it this was its name!

'New York, New York' was between Milne’s Bar and Lakeland on the east side of Hanover Street.

Does anybody remember this restaurant?"

Stuart Lyon, Blackford, Edinburgh:  February 22, 2017

 

Recollections

84.

Reply

6.

Stuart Lyon

Blackford, Edinburgh

Stuart Lyon added:

Reply

Back to Square One - It's not

'New York, New York'

"Do you remember, I said we were only 90% sure that 'New York, New York was the name of the black and white restaurant?

 Well, I have friends in the National Archives of Scotland (now Scotland's People) in General Register House on Princes Street.

I contacted them to get final 10% confirmation of the name by asking them to search the Register of Business'. They have confirmed that 'New York New York' did indeed exist but not until the mid- to late-1980s. That's several years after we used the place, unfortunately.

I’m planning on going back to the Edinburgh Room at Edinburgh Central Library to see if they can offer any more assistance."

Stuart Lyon, Blackford, Edinburgh:  February 28, 2017

 

Recollections

85.

David Moore

USA

Thank you to Bob Sinclair for sending his memories of the  about the West End Café in Shandwick Place, a café first mentioned by Bob  Sinclair in his Recollections 1 above.

David wrote:

The West End Café

"I just wanted to add to the recollections of the  West End Café.   During 1948/49 l visited there on Sunday afternoons as a schoolboy to listen to visiting Jazz Bands playing.  

For one cup of coffee ( all we could afford ) we managed to hear about two hours of wonderful music.!!!    Bands l recall were:

 -  Nat Gonella and his Georgians.

- Jo Daniels and his band (Although Jo was born in South Africa he played most of his music over in the UK and was a first rate drummer.!!). 

- Graham Bell and his Jazz Band (Graham was resident in Australia the band were touring Europe when they ran out of funds and decided to come to tour in the UK to acquire funding to return home.!!   Graham was the leader and pianist and his band played some red hot music.!!)"

More Jazz

"Now an octogenarian, l run a Group in U3A which listen to Swing & Trad Jazz on CDs, which l thoroughly enjoy.   Of course, l have CD's of the above bands which l nostalgically play from time to time and recollect the lovely memories of time spent in the rear room of the West End Cafe.  

I'd very much welcome any comments from your readers with a similar experience."

David Moore Sleaford, Lincolnshire, England:  21 Mar 2017
(ex-Dalkeith Road + Duddingston  Road resident - left Auld Reekie in 1963.)

 

Recollections

86.

Norman Fisher

Saratoga, New South Wales, Australia

Thank you to Norman Fisher who wrote:

Hamburger Restaurant

137 Princes Street

Question

"I wonder if anybody could help me.  When I left Edinburgh in 1965 there was a hamburger restaurant at 137 Princes Street on the site now occupied by McDonalds.  The external decoration was Scottish and, from memory, the menu was McDonalds-ish.

I posted a query on 'Lost Edinburgh' about what it was called and that  sparked a huge amount of correspondence (a lot of it had nothing to do with my query).  The nearest answer seems to be 'McTatties', but that doesn't ring true with me.

Could you point me in the right direction to find out more about its pre-Mcdonald's existence?"

Norman Fisher, Saratoga, New South Wales, Australia:  8 June 2017

Reply to Norman Fisher?

If you know anything about the restaurant that Norman fisher has asked about, please email me to tell me, then I'll pass on Norman's email address to you so that you can contact him.

                Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  15 June 2017

 

Recollections

86.

Reply

1

Darryn McGreevy

Edinburgh

Thank you to Darryn McGreevy who wrote:

Hamburger Restaurant

137 Princes Street

Reply

"As far as I can remember McTatties was, as the name suggests, a baked potato type of shop, albeit a very large one.  Again, from what I remember, this place was only open in the mid- to late-1970s for a couple of years"

Darryn McGreevy, Edinburgh:  18 June 2017

 

Recollections

87.

Michael Allan

Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England

Thank you to Michael Allan who wrote:

The Grail

"I was inspired by the recollections of Paul Sutherland in his Recollection 42 above.  I really enjoyed reading his memories of the Grail in George Street.  It took me back a long way.

It was called the Grail Book and Art Centre.

Doing a bit of research, I found the Glasgow Herald for Sept 24th 1962, with an announcement of its opening."

“Grail Book and Art Centre has been opened at 36 George Street Edinburgh. Reference Library, Reading Room, Books on Christian Unity, Coffee, Caledonian 2295”.

"I also found the following in the online archives of The Tablet, a Roman Catholic journal, dated August 26th 1965."

“Coffee and Theology In the Grail Book and Art Centre in Edinburgh at 36 George Street (where the coffee reaches the same high standard maintained by books and artefacts).

At 8 o'clock each Sunday evening during the Festival there will be discussions on Theology and the Arts.

The Centre is also holding an exhibition of stone rubbings made by Miss Catherine Greig.”

"I believe the Grail was intended to be very much in the spirit of the then recent Second Vatican Council, with the Catholic Church opening its doors and windows (and good Italian coffee) to the modern world  -  something that still needs to happen, some would argue.

I was probably under ten when I first went there with my parents, maybe some time in the late-1960s or early-1970.  My memories of it are quite dim compared with Paul’s.  (I would have been only six months old when it first opened.)

For some weird reason, when I think of the food being served there, scotch eggs come to mind.  Maybe it was the first time I had come across this strange item of Scottish cuisine ...   I would have been too young then to appreciate the marvels of real coffee.

The name of the lady who ran the Grail at that time was Norah McGrath. She was Australian. I believe she and my mother became good friends."

Saturday Mornings

"I always enjoyed our visits there on Saturday mornings. Possibly Paul was there on one of those Saturdays.  Of course the books, as well as the conversation, would all have been well over my young head, but that did not matter.

There may have been some children’s books, but I cannot recall for sure.  I believe there were also occasional events, talks, poetry readings, live music etc. As well as the books, there were LP's and cassettes, and various pieces of artwork for sale.

It was a sad end of an era when it had to close. I think the owners of the building wanted the space back for some other use.  I am fairly certain that some time afterwards, Norah returned to Australia.  As the cliché goes 'all good things come to an end'."

Michael Allan, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England

 

 

Cafes and Restaurants

Recollections

Contributors

 

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