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A selection of my photographs, many from Edinburgh throughout the year.   Also photos from Scotland, London, Iceland, Italy, Hong Kong and elsewhere    Many old maps of Edinburgh (Old Town, New Town, while City), Leith and Newhaven.  Includes several old transport maps and a comparison of old maps with recent aerial photos.   Old engravings, mailly of Edinburgh scenes.  Some from the 1820s, some from the 1890s,  some others - includes many hand-coloured examples from the 1820s.   News from Edinburgh today  -  Events, Collections, Buildings and Gardens, Transport   This site includes     1. Post card portraits taken in studios in Edinburgh:    2. Post card views either takeen/published by Ediburgh photographers or views of Edinburgh, or both.y Edinburgh    Views of Edinburgh, grouped into three sections:     1. Street views:    2. Buildings:    3. Around Edinburgh   Views of transport around Edinburgh  -  Horse drawn trams and buses, cable cars, electric trams, buses and a few railway photos.  Also several maps of Edinburgh's bus and tram routes.   Links to pages with Photos of Groups   Frequently Asked Questions

  Summary of the updates added to this site each month since the site was launched   Links to Dumbiedykes pages  Link to Granton pages  Link to Leith pages   Link to Newhaven pages   Links to Portobello pages   Link to My Recent Talks

 

Recollections  -  Edinburgh Old Town

Dumbiedykes

Factories and Shops

   Dumbiedykes Survey Photograph - 1959  - Arthur Street with lemonade lorry ©

Please click on one of the links below, or scroll down this page.

1.

George C R Stevenson
Livingston, West Lothian

Sweetie shop and Sawmill

Brewery

Box Makers and Newsagent

Boot Repairers, Pub and Café

Grocers and Bookie

'Scotchies'

2.

Jeanette Boon
(née Keighren

Welland, Ontario, Canada

Dumbiedykes Road

-  Shops

-  Dumbiedykes Reunion

3.

Eric Gold
known to many as
Eric McKenzie,
East End, London, England

with further comments from

George Stevenson
Livingston, West Lothian, Scotland

and from

Jean Rae
Edinburgh

and from

Aileen (Alison) McIntosh
née Duff

East Arthur Place  -  'Eastie'

Prospect Street

Middle Arthur Place  -  'Middle'

Ingliston Place

Adam Street

Pleasance

4.

Cathy McKinsley
née Calvey
Peterborough, Cambridgeshire,
England

Caseys

Fish & Chips

Old Simon

5.

Syd Zoltie
Southside, Edinburgh

St Leonard's Hill

Toy Shop

Schools

Shop

6.

Catherine Taylor
née Clark

Jimmy Clark Newsagent

St Leonard's Street

Cigs, Ice Lollies, Sweets

Edinburgh Changes

7.

Alex Blyth
Greendykes, Edinburgh

Salteri's Shop

8.

George Stewart
South Edinburgh

and reply from

Christine Stevenson

Clark's the ewsagents

First Day

Mr & Mrs Clark

9.

Dick Martin
Borders, Scotland

Newspapers

Move to the Scottish Borders

10.

Bill Cockburn
Comely Bank, Edinburgh

Salteri, Grocer

Laing, Grocer

Dumbiedykes Lane

11.

Ian Mycko
Gilmerton, Edinburgh

Salteri, Grocer

12.

Liz Miller
St Brelade, Jersey, Channel Islands

Salteri, Grocer

13.

Tony (Scotty) Henderson
Canada

Chip Shop

14.

Ian McCallum
Rosyth, Fife, Scotland

Chip Shop

15.

John Davie

Shopping in Edinburgh

Mussels

Tusi's Ice Cream

16.

John H Wheeler
France

Alex Cowan & Sons

Strike

Cragside

17.

Janet Walker
(née Gladstone)
Edinburgh

Gladstone's Paper Shop

Baker and Butcher

Pollini's Chip Shop

My Palls

Brewery Workers

18.

Claire Lynch
Musselburgh, East Lothian, Scotland

Salteri's Chippy

19.

John Taylor
Oliva, Valencia, Spain

Cowan's

20

Bob Henderson
Burdiehouse, Edinburgh

Bread

-  Half Loaf

-  Pan Loaf

21

Eric Gold
East End, London, England

Bakers

-  Rush & Jackson's

-  Young Brothers

22

Bryan Gourlay
Biggar, Lanarkshire, Scotland

-  Plain Bread

-  Mother's Messages

-  The Heels

-  Plain Bread  Still sold in Scotland

-  Half Loaf

-  Pieces

23

James McLean

-  Ice ream#

-  Baker

-  Fish and Chips

24

Vince McMahon

-  Tick

-  Coppola's

-  Chippie

25

Rob Barclay
London, England

-  Arthur Street Shop

-  Upper Viewcraig Row

-  Scotchie

-  Church

-  Mobile Shop

-  Mrs Yardley's Shop

-  Leaving Dumbiedykes

26

Norma Borthwick
(née HENDERSON)
Chesser, Edinburgh

-  Arthur Street Shop

-  Upper Viewcraig Row

-  Scotchie

-  Church

-  Mobile Shop

-  Mrs Yardley's Shop

-  Leaving Dumbiedykes

27

Norma Borthwick
(née HENDERSON)
Chesser, Edinburgh

-  Play

-  Family

-  Move from Dumbiedykes

28

Violet-Ann JAKUBEK

Electrical Repair Shop

-  Family Photos

29

Ron Dingwall
Bathgate, West Lothian, Scotland

St Leonard's Street: Question

 

Dumbiedykes Factories, Works and Shops

More pages

Bob Cockburn

Pleasance  Joiners and Bakers

Maureen Mitchell
(
née Graham)

Gilmerton, Edinburgh

Workers at Nelson's Printers, around 1962 ©

Nelson's Print Works

Aileen (Alison) McIntosh
(
née Duff)

Tenement Collapse sweetie shop + sawmill

Rod Barron
Sevenoaks, Kent, England

Barron's Rag Merchants

George T Smith
British Columbia, Canada

with replies from

Mary Kerr
Holland

Eric Gold (Eric McKenzie)
East End, London, England

Janice Brodie
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Cathy McKinsley (née Calvey)
Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England

Jeannie Veitche's Sweetie Shop

 

Recollections

1.

Recollections by George C R Stevenson

Livingston, Scotland

Thank you to George C R H Stevenson, for sending some memories of life in the Dumbiedykes district of Edinburgh from 1953 to 1962.

George wrote:

Sweetie Shop and Saw Mill

"I stayed just adjoining Prospect Place,  in Lower Viewcraig Row Balconies

   Dumbiedykes Survey Photograph - 1959  -  Prospect Street ©

Along the end of Lower Viewcraig Row, there was a sweetie shop called Yardley's and a saw mill where you could get bundles of very thin cut wood to make gliders and any other junk you wanted to make."

Brewery

"Nearby was the Holy Rood Brewery where you got stoppers from the wooden beer barrels for rolling down Bull's Close, Holyrood."

Box Makers and Newsagent

"The factory on the right, I think, was Cowan's box makers.  There was an awful smell of glue from the vats at the bottom windows.

The shop at the far right was Affeck's Newsagents.  Salteri's was at the other end."

Boot Repairers, Pub and Café

"My uncle, Sam Dolbear, had a boot repairers just round the corner in Dumbiedykes Road, next to the Bowlers' Rest Pub, along from Coppolas' Café."

Dumbiedykes Road

   Dumbiedykes Survey Photograph - 1959  -  Looking to the north down Dumbiedykes Roadedykes Road ©

Grocers and Bookie

"I remember just round the corner beside the factory, there was a grocers - Dod Broons, I think it was called.  You could buy a fourpit of potatoes, quarter corned beef, a gallon of pink paraffin in any order, and no sink to wash your hands.

A street bookie used to stand there.  I used to put my Dad's bets on  -  a coin wrapped in a little bit of paper."

George C R H Stevenson

Livingston, West Lothian, Scotland,  May 2005

More memories from George Stevenson:

'The Scotchie'

One of the houses facing St Margaret's Church in your photo, I think, could have been a shop a long time ago.

The house with the paintwork frontage, I'm sure, is where the Whiteheads lived.  I remember George Whitehead.

There was a grocer's shop a couple of doors along, then Salteri's where you could buy sweets off the penny tray, etc.

Dumbiedykes Survey Photograph - 1959  -  Prospect Place ©

This shop faced the hill called 'Scotchies', or 'The Scotchie'

George Stevenson, Livingston:  29 November 2005

 

Recollections

2.

Jeanette Boon
(
née Keighren)

Canada

Thank you to Jeanette Boon, Welland, Ontario, Canada, for the following message.

Jeanette writes:

Dumbiedykes Road

   Dumbiedykes District  -  Dumbiedykes Road from the front of Prospect Place  -  1959 ©

"This photo shows a van outside Gladstone's newspaper shop where my dad used to get his papers.

Next door was the Bakers where they made the best meat pies. 

The top balcony is where a friend of mine used to live.  Her name was Janet Halliday.

Thanks for bringing back nice memories."

Jeanette Boon, Canada  -  7 November 2005

 

Jeanette Boon (formerly Jeanette Keighren) hosted a reunion in Canada, in September 2005, of some former Dumbiedykes residents.

Edinburgh History  -   Recollections  -  Dumbiedykes reunion in Canada ©

 

 

Recollections

3.

Eric Gold

East End, London

Thank you to Eric Gold for the recollections below, including memories of  many of the people and their shops in Dumbiedykes. 

Eric says:

 "Everyone in Arthur Street would know all these people"

Eric wrote:

East Arthur Place

Mr RATTERIE:  Next door to us an No 4 was a grocers shop and Mr Ratterie had it.  I remember when he got the corned beef tin he would make a small hole at the bottom and blow in to it and the corned beef would drop on to a dirty bench and then with his thumbnail he would pluck the corned beef on to a bit of paper.

He also had a van which one freezing snowy winter crashed over and we all got inside and helped ourselves.

Before Mr Ratterie the chap who had the shop was called Ian.  He was an English guy.  He was a friend of our family. So was Doctor Goldberg the residential Doctor for most of Arthur Street.

WILLIE CURRAN:  Opposite, there was Willie Curran a grocers, a great guy.

DODD DICKSON:  I remember Dodd, the fruit and veg man.  Somebody wrote that his name was Dodd Broon but my sister tells me that his name was  Dodd Dickson.  My sister is a lot older than me.  She lives in Edinburgh and knew Arthur Street well.

Thank you to Aileen (Alison) McIntosh (née Duff) who wrote:

"Dodd Dickson was my uncle.  He had a shop at the corner of Arthur Street and Prospect Street with my Auntie Chrissie (Teenie).

Their daughters Grace and Aline are my cousins.  Their son Davie unfortunately died last year.  My Mum Rae (maiden name Dunn) was born in Prospect Terrace and she had quite a few brothers and sisters."

Aileen added:

"The pictures are great.  I was at Drummond Street, School, then South Bridge. 

When my folks moved over from Fife we lived with my Auntie Chrissie and Uncle Dodd in Prospect Street until we got a house in Ingliston Street. 

Round about 1963 we moved to King's Stables Road and then after I was married, for a few years, Gordon and I got a house in Viewcraig."

Aileen (Alison) McIntosh (née Duff),
 Roseburn, Edinburgh:  January 16, 2007

RUSH & JACKSON:  Up the brae from Dodd's there was a bakers called Rush and Jackson.  The daughter Sylvia Rush was in my sisters class at school at St Patrick's in St Johns Hill.

The daughter was in my sisters class at school. They were great pals.  Rush and Jackson were in Arthur Street on the brae on the right hand side looking up the brae from the Queen's Park.

It was owned by the Drysdale family well before my time.  Both bakers were the bees knees.  My mum would get a big bag of broken biscuits from both families until we moved to Craigmillar.

KATIE BURGESS:  Also in Eastie there was a grocer called Katie Burgess.

TOFFEE APPLE MAN:  At the end of Eastie there was the toffee apple man.  He used to make the toffee apples in his house there and would say to me: "If you can help me with the big basket of apples up the brae I will give you one free."  And so I did.

Prospect Street

MR SPIER:  Opposite Dodd's, at the end of Prospect street, was a newsagents called Mr Spier, a nice man.

CAPOLA'S Café:  Down the Brae.

SWEETIE SHOP:  there was a small sweetie shop were you can buy a penny Vantis (soft drink) and a penny Dainty and gobstoppers.

 

Middle Arthur Place

MRS BOOTH:  In Middle Arthur Place known as "Middle" there was Mrs Booth a grocer too, with big staring eyes.

MR LINTON:  Opposite was Mr Linton a second-hand radio and TV shop.

CHIPPIE:  Down the brae a wee bit was a chippie owned by an Italian family.

CASSIDY'S:  There was a small shop at the end of Middle Arthur place called Cassidy's.  I hung around with their son called James Cassidy.

Ingliston Place

CHIPPIE:  ... but the best chippie was in Ingliston place at the top of Arthur Street and the bottom Adam Street.  I can still taste the chips to this day .

Adam Street

YOUNG BROTHERS:  In Adam Street, there was Young Brothers the bakers.

CUNNINGHAM's: Cunningham's the butchers were in East Adam Street.

We would get a cheap sheep's hied (head) from the butchers as it made good stock for broth, and also my auntie had an Alsatian dog called 'Rusty' and he would have a good dinner once the heid cooled down.

I took the eye out of the heid one day and put it in a hankie and covered it with tomato ketchup and ran into Mrs Booth's in Middle Arthur place and said "My eye has fell out".  I would always catch her on April fools day.  Mind you, my mum gave me a back hander but it was well worth the laugh.

GEORGE THE BARBER:  "George the Barber" was in East Adam Street.  He was the only barber hairdresser who could give a man a good shave and hair cut with a cut throat razor that barbers use without really concentrating on the face as most of the time he would have a great blether (chat) with someone in the shop and do his job professionally.

He was a great character and was well liked by all in Arthur Street.  He told me he has never cut anyone's face while shaving them.

JIMMY BROADBENT:  The street bookie was called Jimmy Broadbent. He would stand at the corner of 'Eastie' and take bets.  He too was a friend of our family.

Photograph of Tommy Valance, Jimmy Broadbent and Bella Gold (nee McMillan) in East Arthur Place, Dumbiedykes, 1958 ©

Pleasance

MR SCHOLBERG:  Mr Scholberg had a joke shop in the Pleasance but later rented the premises to Dr Goldberg.

We would buy stink bombs and other funny stuff of him.  I let a few of in my classroom at St Patrick's.

On the day after the Jewish Sabbath or any Jewish holiday Dr Goldberg and Mr Scholberg would invite our family to his house in St Leonard's place and we would have a lovely meal then the big treat would come when he played all the big jazz stuff like Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday and all the great stars.

 When we were at home Mr Scholberg would come to our house and he tuned into a an American jazz station with the radio that he gave us.  What a sound it had and it was through Mr Scholberg and Dr Goldberg and my mother and father that got me hooked on jazz.

I remember the day Billie Holiday died in 1959 as I went in to Mr Scholberg's shop for stink bombs and he was crying so I said what is up as I though he had bad news from Hungary and he told me that it was announced on the radio that Billie Holiday had died in New York.

 Eric Gold, East End, London:  February 22 to19, 2006

George Stevenson writes:

"Eric Gold’s contributions were very interesting. Especially about Mr Scholberg,  Scholeys as we use to call his Aladdin’s Cave - penny bangers etc."

George Stevenson, Livingston, West Lothian, Scotland:  February 21, 2006

Eric Gold replies:

"Do tell George many thanks for his kind words, and I remember that you could get fireworks there too.  We called the bangers squibs."

 Eric Gold, East End, London:  February 22, 2006

Jean Rae also remembers Scholberg's shop in the Pleasance.

Jean says:

"I used to buy tiny toys from Mr Scholberg's shop in the Pleasance.  They cost a farthing each.   (There were 960 farthings in £1.)

One day my mother had money (from where?) and she gave me £5.  I spent the whole £5 on farthing toys, thinking I would never again need to buy any more toys.  My mother was not happy when I told her what I had done.  (I expect Mr Scholberg would have been happy that day!)

 

Recollections

4.

Cathy McKinsley née Calvey

Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England

Thank you to Cathy McKinsley, who remembers Jeannie Veitche's Sweetie Shop in Crosscauseway, and also the shops below:

Cathy wrote:

Casey's

"We had Casey's Chocolate shop on the left hand side of Carnegie Street, just down from the Deaconess Hospital.  That was before they became, 'Casey's of Edinburgh'.

If my memory serves me well, I think it was a small shop.  They cooled the chocolate on a table by the open windows at the back room of the shop.  

Needless to say, the windows were heavily screened with strong wire mesh to stop us street urchins from helping ourselves - although that didn't stop us poking our scrawny fingers through in an attempt to get a scrape of chocolate. (Sweet coupons were still in force then.)

The aroma just drew us!  Alas, the trays were always just out of reach and we were always chased away with a mouthful from the owners."

 

Fish & Chips

"There was a fish and chip shop further down Carnegie Street.  I can't recall the owner's name. However, one of your readers was absolutely right when he said, ' the best fish and chip shop was in Ingliston Street'."

Old Simon

"Does anyone remember old Simon, the Jewish man, who re-stuffed mattresses and pillows?  His place was at the top of Brown Street on the right hand side going towards the Pleasance.  I remember it was down some steps."

Cathy McKinsley (née Calvey), Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England:  September 6, 2007

 

Recollections

5.

Syd Zoltie

Southside, Edinburgh

Thank you to who still lives at Southside, Edinburgh, for sending his recollections of growing up in the area.

Syd wrote:

St Leonard's Hill

"I was born in 1930 at 15, St Leonard's Hill.  We were a large Jewish family, and I was the youngest of 10 children.  My father, Morris had no favourites.  He hated all of us! "

Toy Shop

"My uncle was Michael Schulberg who had the toy shop in St. Mary Street. He lived at 123 Nicholson Street, above the fish shop.

One of his party tricks was to comb the hairs on his legs (which were unbelievably long!) After his retirement he emigrated to South Africa, where he died around 1970."

Schools

"We left  St .Leonard's Hill in 1939 and moved to 3, Dalkeith Road.  I went to Preston Street School and then to Boroughmuir until 1948."

Shops

"Being Jewish, we had a plethora of local shops:

Kleinbergs the Kaker in East Crosscauseway

Hoffenbergs the butcher in West.

Lurie the butcher in Buccleuch Street

Many other Jewish shops were scattered around the area:

Pass

Rosen

Bialeck

Cowen

 as well as a Kosher fish and chip shop in Davie Street called Bullons."

Syd Zoltie, Southside, Edinburgh:  January 9, 2008.

 

Recollections

6

Catherine Taylor née Clark

Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England

Thank you to Catherine Taylor (née Clark) who wrote:

Jimmy Clark Newsagent

"I have found the James Clark School pages, and wonder if any of the former pupils remember my mum & dads shop."

UPDATE

See 'Recollections 8' below

 

St Leonard's Street

 "They were at St Leonard's Street from 1954 until the early 1970s when they moved across the road to the old co-op bakery shop."

Cigs, Ice Lollies, Sweets

"A great many of the schools pupils bought their single cigs, ice lollies and sweets from the old shop."

Edinburgh Changes

"I myself went to Darroch which sadly is no longer a school like so many.  I've been back and, sad to say, find so much has changed.

Even the church I was married in (St Paul's Newington) is no longer functioning  as a Church of Scotland.

Recently my daughter visited Edinburgh and stayed in Drummond Street School (my first school) now residential accommodation."

Catherine Taylor (née Clark), Doncaster, South Yorkshire, England:  February 10, 2008

 

Recollections

7.

Alex Blyth

Greendykes, Edinburgh

Alex Blyth, Greendykes, Edinburgh wrote:

Salteri's Shop

 "My wife's great grandfather was Dario Salteri who (I am told) ran a chip shop at Dumbiedykes.

Can anyone give any info on the type of shop, the people etc."

Alex Blyth, Greendykes, Edinburgh: July 31, 2008

Answer?

In 'The Scotchie' paragraph in 'Recollections 1' above, there is a brief mention of a Salteri  shop.  If anybody knows anything more about this shop or any other Salteri shops in Dumbiedykes, please email me, then I'll pass on the details to Alex.

Thank you.    - Peter Stubbs:  August 5, 2008

 

Recollections

8.

George Stewart

South Edinburgh

Thank you to George Stewart who wrote

Clark's the Newsagents

"I used to work for Clark's, the newsagents.  In fact it was my first job.  I was 12 years old and by law you were supposed to be 13 years but my mum told a wee lie and said I was nearly 13. This was in 1970 and I was still at primary school."

First Day

"Mrs Clark took me on the paper  round first day and gave me a well-used piece of cardboard to show all the names etc. I vaguely remember a girl who used to take the wee  Pekinese dog for walkies (Catherine Taylor?).  Come to think of it Mrs Clarks name i think was Cathy."

Mr & Mrs Clark

"Both Mr and Mrs Clark smoked very strong cigarettes and Mr Clark. liked a wee refreshment in the Parkside Bar on the corner opposite the fruit shop.

We stayed at Carnegie Court. Mr Clark was very strict on timekeeping for both morning and evening rounds.  Mrs Clark used to stick up for me most times, but it stood me in good stead for all the other jobs in that part of the Southside."

Mrs Millar's Dairy

"In fact i also worked in the second shop, next to No. 47, and for Mrs Millar's dairy shop on the corner of St Leonards Lane at the same time,  so i didnae  really have time to sleep in.

One of the people I used to deliver to was Mrs Crawford (Aggie).  She was very good to me,  She stayed on the very top floor on the corner of Forbes Street, and due to ill health was unable to get up and down the stairs, so i used to help her out whenever possible.

It  just seems like yesterday!!!"

Update

Thank you to Christine Stevenson who replied:

"I was reading a story from  George Stewart regarding Mrs. Miller's shop, in St Leonard's Lane.  This shop was run by my mum's uncle, Jim Millar, and his wife

My mum used to work there sometimes in the late-1950s.  Her name was Agnes Brown.

My son know work in the 'Engine Shed', across the road.  It's a small world.

Christine Stevenson, Edinburgh:  March 2, 2011

 

George Stewart, South Edinburgh: August 20, 2008

 

Recollections

9.

Dick Martin

Borders, Scotland

Thank you to Dick Martin who wrote

Newspapers

"In 1960, I lived in Heriot Mount for a few months and collected my dally paper 'The Herald' each morning before going to work.

The system was I laid a 3d piece on the counter and lifted my paper.  The guy behind the counter would 'grunt' which was his way of saying "Good morning.  Have a nice day."

Move to the Scottish Borders

"What a difference when I left Edinburgh and went to live in Jedburgh in the Scottish Borders. At the newsagents there, it was not  possible to just lay the cash on the counter and stroll off.

The lady behind the counter had to hand the newspaper to you and, as a newcomer to the town, then have a conversation: 'Where do you work?', 'Where are you from?'  'How many kids do you have?', etc. etc.

This happened regardless of how many customers were waiting behind in the queue.  This was not her being nosey but more a welcome to the town.  This way, a newcomer was quickly known by everybody in the town, and strangers all said good morning in the passing."

Dick Martin, Borders, Scotland: August 27, 2008

 

Recollections

10.

Bill Cockburn

Comely Bank, Edinburgh

Thank you to Bill Cockburn who wrote

Salteri - Grocer

"The Salteri shop in Prospect Street was a general grocery shop. The owners stayed at number 14 Prince Albert Buildings. I stayed at number 16.  I knew their son, Douglas. I believe that he became a photographer for one of the papers.

At the foot of the hill from this shop, on the corner of Dumbiedykes Road there was a chip shop, but I don't recall the name.  If it was Salteri it was not the same Salteri as the aforementioned."

Laings  -  Grocer

"I think the Grocer/off-licence in Prospect Place was Laings."

Dumbiedykes Lane

"I remember Dumbiedykes Lane.  It ran behind the 'Brickies' in Dumbiedykes Road, and led to Holyrood Square, then via a pend under the buildings on to Holyrood Road.

Bill Cockburn, Comely Bank, Edinburgh:  November 13, 2008

 

 Recollections

11.

Ian Mycko

Gilmerton, Edinburgh

Thank you to Bill Cockburn who wrote:

Salteri - Grocer

"Here is a bit more info on Salteri's shop in Prospect Street.

His  his name was Carlo Salteri.  I can't remember his wife's name.  They had a son, Douglas,  who was a photographer with the Daily Record.

They stayed in Prince Albert Buildings.  When Dumbiedykes was demolished, he got a shop in the Canongate, opposite Bull's Close, which I often stopped at on my way to work at Hendry's Soft Drinks in Lower London Road, sometime just for a chat.

The Salteris moved to Easter Road after Dumbiedykes, but as time went on I lost touch, and don't know what happened to them."

Ian Mycko, Gilmerton, Edinburgh:  November 14, 2008

 

 Recollections

12.

Liz Miller

St Brelade, Jersey, Channel Islands

Thank you to Liz Miller who wrote:

Salteri - Grocer

"I remember about the Salteri shop, but don't recall it being a chip shop.

Douglas Salteri went to Moray House School, 1948-1958 and was in the same Secondary School classes as myself.  I never saw him after we left."

Liz Miller, St Brelade, Jersey, Channel Islands:  November 14, 2008

 

 Recollections

13.

Tony (Scotty) Henderson

Canada

Thank you to Tony Henderson who wrote:

Chip Shop

"The chip shop at the corner of Prospect and Dumbiedykes Road was Tam Pallini's in my day. 

He was quite a big man.  I don't know what happened to the shop after he died."

Message left in guest book by Tony (Scotty) Henderson, Canada:  November 14, 2008

 

 Recollections

14.

Ian McCallum

Rosyth, Fife, Scotland

Thank you to Ian McCallum who wrote:

Chip Shop

"I remember the chip shop being run by Italians called 'Paciti'.

I hope the spelling is correct.

I think they had a daughter called Frances."

Ian McCallum, Rosyth, Fife, Scotland:  November 14, 2008

 Recollections

15.

John Davie

Thank you to John Davie who wrote:

Shopping in Edinburgh

"I chanced on your site with the photographs of Davie Street.  My name is John Davie and I'm now seventy-one years old.  I was brought up in Craigmillar and I used to go 'up the town' for messages for my mother when I was about ten years old

I bought haddock from 'Granton Fisheries' and pork-sausages from 'Hornig's Butchers' in Clerk Street.  That was my routine on a Saturday morning and my old mother would reward me with sixpence on top of the 2/6d. it cost for each of the food purchases."

Mussels

" I would spend my money on a saucer of mussels and a poke of buckies from the fisherwoman who had a stance in Davie Street. She wore the full uniform and had a creel. I think she came from Fisherrow. The mussels were delicious and the peppered-juice was even better when I drank it from the saucer at the end.

The buckies were lovely and juicy on the pin and I always looked forward to Saturday mornings."

Tusi's Ice Cream

"I can also remember being fascinated by an ice-cream shop which was opposite the turning into Davie Place.  It had its name on a fascia above the premises and it was called TUSI BROS.  I didn't understand it at the time, but it was obviously "Tusi Brothers" and almost certainly an Italian business.

 Those were the days!!!.  Thanks for rekindling some innocent memories of when I was a boy.   All the best.  John."

John Davie:  November 20, 2008

 Recollections

16.

John H Wheeler

France

Thank you to John Wheeler, now living in France, who wrote about the time he spent at Alex Cowan & Son's Cragside factory, Dumbiedykes.

John wrote:

Alex Cowan & Sons

"I commenced a 5-year apprenticeship with Alex Cowan & Sons at Craigside Works in March 1954 and was employed by the then manager Alan Dodman, son of the previous manager.

The factory looked as though it had always been exactly as it was!  There were five levels if I recall correctly, due to the steep street outside.

On the top floor was:

-  the Ruling Department, using both pen and disc ruling

-  the Quarter Binding Department

-  the Finishing Department

-  the Half Binders.

Hand made envelopes were also made on this level.

One floor down was:

-  the Sales Office

-  the Finished Book and Stationery Store

-  the Finishing Department

-  the Typesetting

-  the Canteen

-  the Sick Bay.

 Through a hole in the wall was the Envelope Machine Room.

The next level also had:

- the Factory Offices

-  the Cost Office

 and a half flight down was the large paper warehouse.

One more level down was

-  the Envelope Cutting Room.

On the lowest level, which was at the foot of Arthur Street, were:

-  the Despatch Bay

-  the Packing Room

-  Glue Making

-  a further Envelope Store."

Strike

"In 1956, there was a strike by the printers' union and the whole factory closed down for about 3 months. Being an apprentice I was told to lay off orders, pack them and arrange despatch of all goods!

Unlike today, the pickets after a week or two, began to help me by telling me where to find some obscure items and they were more interested in how I was coping with what was not really my job!"

Cragside

 I was at Craigside until 1960, when I was sent through to the Glasgow Sales OfficeI loved my time at Craigside and served with many people who had a great influence upon me and what I learned:

-  Alan Dodman, Manager

-  John Ferrier, Northern Sales Manager

-  Alex Bradford, Works Manager

-  Hugh Dalgleish, Sales Office Manager

-   Mrs Pirnie, Welfare

-  Willie Borland, envelope cutting foreman

-  Danny, despatch manager

-  Mr Reid, ruling foreman

-  and many more!

John Wheeler, France:  November 13, 2008

 

 Recollections

17.

Janet Walker

(née Nettie Gladstone)

Thank you to Janet Walker (née Nettie Gladstone) for sending me her memories of Dumbiedykes.

Janet wrote:

Gladstone's Paper Shop

"I thoroughly enjoyed what I read on the web site about the old Dumbiedykes, especially when  Jeanette Boon (Keighran) Canada mentioned her Dad getting his papers from Gladstone's  shop (in recollections 2. above).

Jimmy Gladstone was my Dad.  I am the youngest of his four daughters.

Ella, the oldest, is now in Cupar,  Fife,

Winnie is Edinburgh

Isobel is in Calgary Canada

-  I live in Edinburgh

We lived in No. 36 and the shop was No. 66, then my sisters and I lived for a while in No. 70 when we got married."

Baker and Butcher

"John the Baker had his shop next to my Dad's then there was the stair entrance then Bert the Butcher shop."

Pollini's Chip Shop

"Tam Pollini had his chip shop on the opposite cornerI remember he had a painting hanging on the wall, titled 'When did you last see your Father?'  It was of a young boy, standing in front of what looked like a court in the 1800s.

There was also a clock with no hands on another wall with a notice 'no tick'.  I guess you couldn't get a bag of chips without the cash!"

My Pals

"My pals of those days were:

Betty Blackwood

-  Betty Gillan

Agnes Robertson

Jim and Kitty Wood

Jean Baigent

-  John Muir

Jean Bottomley and her family

-  many more"

I hope some-one out there will remember us Gladstone Girls and maybe reply .yours Janet Walker (née Nettie Gladstone)."

Brewery Workers

"I remember the brewery men coming into Dad's shop for their 2 ciggies and morning paper on their way to work.

They came back later in the day for another 2 on their way home (rather tipsy) after their free tipple in the Brewery."

Janet Walker, (née Nettie Gladstone), Edinburgh:  February 16, 2009

Message for Janet?

If you'd like to contact Janet Walker (née Nettie Gladstone), please email me, then I'll pass on your email to Janet.

Thanks you.    -  Peter Stubbs:  February 25, 2009

 

 Recollections

18.

Claire Lynch

Musselburgh, East Lothian, Scotland

Thank you to Claire Lynch, Musselburgh, East Lothian, who wrote

Salteri's Chippy

"My great grandad was Dario Salteri. He had a chippy in Holyrood area.  I'm not sure where, exactly! His son Gaetano (Guy) was my Grandad.

My dad told me, recently, that Guy told him that Dario would gamble with other chippy owners occasionally.  Sometimes he would come home with 5 chippies and sometimes just the original one. There was an agreement that no matter what happened you would hang on to your original chippy!

Dario and his wife Amelia had 6 kids, 3 boys and 3 girls, Minerva, Anita, Amelia, Gaetano, Dorando and Carlo. Guy and his wife Caterine had 7 children.  They settled in Piershill until they died.

I'd love to hear any stories people have about the Salteri family!"

Claire Lynch, Musselburgh, East Lothian, Scotland:  February 16, 2009

REPLY

Hi Claire

Other poeple have also mentioned Salteri shops in the recollections on this page, including:

-  1 above:  "Salteri's, where you cold buy sweets off the penny tray"

-  7 above:  "My wife's great grandfather was Dario Salteri who, I am told, ran a chip shop at Dumbiedykes.
(I'll let you know how to contact Alex Blyth, who wrote this comment.)

- 10 above: "The Salteri shop in Prospect Street was a general grocery shop.  At the foot of the hill from this shop, on the corner of Dumbiedykes Road there was a chip shop, but I don't recall the name.  If it was Salteri it was not the same Salteri as the aforementioned."

-  11 above: "The owner of the Salteri grocer's shop was Carlo Salteri.  I can't remember his wife's name.  They had a son, Douglas,  who was a photographer with the Daily Record.
They stayed in Prince Albert Buildings. 
(This paragraph also gave a little more details.)

Also, from the Dumbiedykes - People and Play page:

- 1 a:  "My brother and I joined the 40th St Margaret's Church Cubs.  The Church was next to Salteri's dairy."

Peter Stubbs:  February 26, 2009

 

 Recollections

19

John Taylor

Oliva, Valencia, Spain

Thank you to John Taylor who wrote:

Cowan's

"My Aunt Mary worked for Cowans in Arthur Street.

She left and went to the Inveresk Paper Mill in McDonald Road, but then it was called Andrew Levy & Sons

She was an envelope maker.  The envelopes were hand-made.  She always brought home plenty of scrap paper for drawing on."

John Taylor, Oliva, Valencia, Spain:  July 18, 2009

 

Recollections

20.

Bob Henderson

Burdiehouse, Edinburgh

Thank you to Bob Henderson who wrote:

Bread

Half Loaf

"My generation still call a loaf of plain bread a half loaf.  I don't know why.

In the baker at the foot of our stair in Arthur Street,  there were at least six of these loaves baked together in a batch.

I often saw these as I used to have to collect the bread from the shop whilst it was still hot.  The baker just peeled one off the end of the batch.

I can still taste the warm doughy outer skin I peeled off and eaten on my way upstairs.  The top crust on these loaves was always coal black and had its own wonderful distinctive flavour and the bottom crust was hard and crunchy with a coating of flour, again with its own wonderful taste."

Pan Loaf

"The pan loaf was totally different and considered a little posher. that's why the ladies from Morningside etc. were said to speak with a" pan loaf accent."

Bob Henderson, Burdiehouse, Edinburgh:  May 21, 2010

 Recollections

21.

Eric Gold

East End, London, England

Thank you to Eric Gold who wrote:

Rush & Jackson

Bakers

"Bob Henderson (20 above) made an entry about the bakers in Arthur Street.  Well, he was right.  We would go down the stairs to the bakers and we would get pies and a half loaf, but also well fired rolls.

These were rolls that were overcooked and had a black top on them.  They were very popular in Arthur StreetThen, on the Sunday morning we would have our eggs and bacon, not forgetting the black pudding, in them.

Like Bob, I can still smell the lovely smell of bread and can still feel the heat as the bakers baked the bread.  The bakery was situated on the right hand side of the brae going up Arthur Street from Willie Currans newsagents

Their pies were the best I have ever tasted.  There were hundreds of cats on the back green, hoping for a meal, a rat or an old pie (ha ha ha ha).  Those those were the priceless days!"

The bakers was called Rush & Jackson's.  I know that it changed hands a few times, but the people in Arthur Street still called it Rush and Jackson’s.  It was called Drysdale's until Rush & Jackson bought it out in the early-1950s.

My sister, Ella, was a great friend of one of the daughters, Sylvia Rush.  They were in the same class throughout their schooling years and loved dancing in the clubs in the 1950s."

Young Brothers

Bakers

"There was also a Young Brothers' Bakers at the top of the brae.  They had many shops and delivery vans in Edinburgh."

Eric Gold, East London, England:  May 31, 2010 + June 1, 2010.

 Recollections

22.

Bryan Gourlay

Biggar, Lanarkshire, Scotland

Thank you to Bryan Gourlay who wrote:

Plain Bread

"I’ve had a life-long love of plain bread mentioned by Bob Henderson (Recollections 20 above)   – much preferring it to the doughy and tasteless white pan variety.

As Bob says, ‘plain breed’ was considered very much working class fare by those who felt they had moved up the food chain. My mother would rarely buy plain bread which she thought was only for common people.  When she did, it was put at the bottom of the shopping bag so she could smuggle it into the house without our neighbours seeing it. Plain bread was almost a badge of poverty."

Mother's Messages

"Going my mother’s messages invariably meant getting a half loaf and a forpit o’ tatties. She was never pleased if I came back on the odd occasion with plain instead of pan bread – pleading that all the pan loaves had been sold."

The Heels

"There was always a race to get to the heels of the bread before anyone else in the household could.  The 'heels' were the the end slices (known as 'outsiders' in Glasgow). They were generally thicker and had more generous top and bottom crusts.  It was, and still is, a big disappointment if one of the heels was wafer thin. One of my sons says he didn’t realise plain bread had any heels, because his brothers always snaffled them well before he got there."

Plain Bread  -  Still sold in Scotland

"Plain bread was one of the things I missed most when I lived south of the border, off and on, for 20 years – the English, south of a line between Carlisle and Newcastle, have yet to discover plain bread. One of our final tasks before heading south was always to buy a few loaves of plain bread to take down with us. Sadly, they didn’t last too long.

I think the stigma attached to plain bread has waned considerably over the years as it seems to hold its place against all the fancy types on the supermarket shelves nowadays – even in Marks and Spencer where it is described as 'Scottish Plain'.

Although, I suspect a few older shoppers might still cover up their plain loaf in their trolley with some other items, and desperately hope no one they know is going through the checkout when they are."

Half Loaf

"Bread was always referred to as a ‘half loaf’ in Edinburgh.  I think this was because the size of the bread commonly sold was half the size of the full loaf they used to bake in earlier years.

I can remember a couple of bakers selling full sized, unsliced pan loaves in the 1950s – one of them in South Clerk Street in the stretch between Gifford Park and the New Vic."

Pieces

"Plain bread made great cheese, beetroot and jam pieces.

It was not all that uncommon to see a youngster in a pram sucking on a top or bottom crust of plain bread that had been dipped in jam, rather than the dummy, much in favour today – but not in Morningside of course, where they have been known to cut the crusts off their pan bread and even quarter sandwiches diagonally!"

Bryan Gourlay, Biggar, Lanarkshire, Scotland:  May 31, 2010

 

Recollections

23

Jams McLean

Thank you to James McLean who wrote:

Ice Cream

"If you turned left at the top of Carnegie Street, a few paces along, there were two shops:

-  the first one was an ice cream shop

next door was the baker's shop belonging to my uncle Sam Bialeck.

Baker

"Across the road, almost opposite, was Whitecross’ butcher shop.  It was on the corner of a narrow alleyway. It must have been very popular as there always seemed to be a queue out on to the pavement there.

 I know that, for a considerable time after our family moved to Prestonfield, my mother still  got on the bus to shop at Minnie Whitecross’ butcher.

Fish & Chips

"I also seem to remember a popular chip-shop somewhere between Beaumont Place and St. Leonards coal yard, on the opposite side of the road."

James McLean:  May 30, 2010

Recollections

24.

Vince McManamon

Darlington, Durham, England

Thank you to Vince McManamon for writing about shops in Dumbiedykes (below).

Thanks, Vince, for also writing about:

-   Living in Dumbiedykes and

Friends in Dumbiedykes

Tick

"Shops played a big part in our lives as sustenance was the main focus of our attention for the next eleven years.

Mrs Aikman's on the corner of Arthur Street and Dumbiedykes allowed you 'tick'.  This was a godsend as mum had no idea about handling money."

Coppola's

"A bit along from Aikman's was Coppola's, selling sweets, ices juice and fags.  They were a nice Italian family."

Chippie

"Then there was a pub, and on the corner of Prospect Place, a chippie where, if you handed in newspapers, you got a bag of chips.

Above the chippie, there was a sign saying that the Dumbies was built in 1867.  Further along, was a butchers where we would buy offal, and rabbit if we were well off."

Vince McManamon, Darlington, Durham, England:  July 19, 2010

Recollections

25.

Rob Barclay

London, England

Thank you to Rob Barclay who wrote:

Arthur Street Shop

"I lived with my parents, Bob & Jessie Barclay in Prospect Street. My parents ran a small shop in Arthur Street for about two years from 1958/9 to 1960/1."

Upper Viewcraig Row

"We then moved round to No. 10 Upper Viewcraig Row and lived there until everyone around was moved out.  Our next door neighbours were the Kelly family

I also noticed that Jim Hildersley wrote to you back in 2009, I remember the family well from that time there.

I also recall that in our house, we had a bath in the kitchen which was used for all of the kids, me and my two younger brothers. And very often other kids would get sent round on a Sunday to have a bath too;  it was a great event as the water was everywhere once we had all finished."

Scotchie

"We all used to climb up and play on the Scotchie and used to run through the garage out to the Pleasance.  The garage belonged to the University of Edinburgh and I think that they carried out maintenance there."

Church

"I remember going to church on a Sunday and my mother giving us money for the collection which we always managed to hold onto."

Mobile Shop

"When we lived at Upper Viewcraig Row, my father for a time ran a ‘mobile shop' and then an ice-cream van which he parked out in the street."

Mrs Yardley's Shop

"I remember an incident with Miss Yardley’s shop very well to this day.  I was on the way home from Milton House Primary and went into the shop where I stole a bar of toffee.

When my mother found out, that evening, she marched me back to the shop and made me tell Miss Yardley what I had done.  I was so mortified and still remember it to this day, and the stories from your other contributors also bring back so many memories."

Leaving Dumbiedykes

"We were moved out to Southhouse in the mid-1960s, and then I moved down to London in the late-1980s, where I still live, although I do return to Edinburgh to visit family."

Bob Barclay, London, England:  December 23, 2010

Recollections

26.

Norma Borthwick (née Henderson)

Chesser, Edinburgh

Thank you to Norma Borthwick who wrote:

Grandfather's Shop

"Dodd (George) Dickson was my grandfather.  He had the shop on Arthur Street near Prospect Street where he lived.  We loved visiting them and used to play in the street and up the ‘Scotchie’.

We lived in Raes Buildings near Holyrood Road.  Does anyone have a photo of it?"

Other Shops

"We used to play in the park.

I loved the ice cream shop on Dumbiedykes Road near the foot of Arthur Street.  It could have been a café.  I think that there was another shop next door.

I also remember Mr Affeck’s shop on Arthur Street."

Norma Borthwick, Chesser, Edinburgh,  January 11, 2011

 

Recollections

27.

Norma Borthwick (née Henderson)

Chesser, Edinburgh

Norma Borthwick added:

Play

"We were always in the Queen’s Park, either climbing up Arthur Seat or up to the ruined monument, or playing in the swing park."

Family

"I think that my Granny lived either at 3 or 9 Prospect Street.  My Dad lived in Ingliston Street, just round the corner from Adam Street. (There was a great chip shop in Ingliston Street.)

My Mum and Dad were married in St Margaret’s Church.  Their married name was HendersonMum’s maiden name was Dickson and my Gran’s maiden name was Dunn.

I have watched the film clip about Arthur Street that refers to it as slums but we had a super time growing up in that area."

Move from Dumbiedykes

"I've lived in Edinburgh all my life.  First, I lived at Raes Buildings (I'd love to see a photograph!) and I went to Moray House Nursery. 

We later moved to Magdalene when it was a new estate and then to Joppa.  I now live on the west side of the city at Chesser."

Norma Borthwick, Chesser, Edinburgh,  January 17, 2011

Recollections

28.

Violet-Anne Jakubek

Worcester, Worcestershire, England

Violet-Anne Jakubek wrote:

Electrical Shop

"My parents, Paul Jakubek and Jean Ackroyd lived at No. 35 Carnegie Sreet when I was born in 1954.  My dad had a shop in Davie Street that was compulsory purchased from under his feet in the 1960s.  I believe he mended broken electrical things and allowed people to lodge in the rooms above the shop.

I wonder if any of your browsers remember anything about my family.  My father was a short gent, and Polish.  HIs English language was not very good, though he did get by quite well.

Family Photos

"Sadly, my 3 siblings and I were taken into care in early-1955 or thereabouts and I never did find out why, or get to meet my mother, tho' I did manage to meet my father later on.

I also believe that we were in a home up Marchmount area, and that there may be photographs of us somewhere.  I have no pictures of when I was a child, and would love it if some were located.

Both parents have since passed away, but it has left me with a void, not knowing anything about their life, or my own in the 1950s or after."

Violet-Anne Jakubek:  Worcester, Worcestershire, England.  March 23+27, 2011

Reply to Violet-Ann

If you remember Violet-Ann or any of her family, or have any photos, that you think might interest her, I'm sure she would  be pleased to hear from you.  Please email me, then I'll pass on your message to her.  Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  March 26, 2011

Recollections

29.

Ron Dingwall

Bathgate, West Lothian, Scotland

Ron Dingwall who wrote:

Question

Mr Turner's Shop

"I'm trying to pinpoint the exact location of Mr Turner's Newsagents in the St Leonard's area.  My memory tells me it was at the top of St Leonard's Street, just before you reached Lutton Place.

However, it has been suggested to me that it was at the beginning of Dalkeith Road, after Lutton Place, next to Stonehouse the Grocer.

 There was certainly an empty shop there as I recall but could he have moved premises between the 1950s and 1960s."

Ron Dingwall, Bathgate, West Lothian, Scotland:  August 21, 2012

Reply 1

Mr Turner's Shop

I've had a look, today, at my Edinburgh & Leith Post Office Directory, 1961-62, to see if I could find any mention of Mr Turner's Newsagents.

The directory showed Joseph V Turner and JS Turner, both living in St Leonard's Street, somewhere between Nos 54 and 70 - between St Leonard's goods station and St Leonard's Lane - but no street number was given.

The directory made no mention of whether or not either had a Newsagent's shop at that address or elsewhere in St Leonard's Street.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  March 26, 2011

Reply 2

Mr Turner's Shop

Here is a progress report from Ron Dingwall on what he has discovered so far.  Ron writes:

"I did a bit more research into Turner's shop and in the Post Office Directory.  Listed under the businesses section, I found Turner's Newsagent at 147A St Leonards Street.

However there is still a question over whether he moved shop in the late-1950s from premises in Dalkeith Road, next to Stonehouse grocers, on the other side of Lutton Place."

Ron Dingwall, Bathgate, West Lothian, Scotland:  October 18, 2012

Send a Reply to Ron Dingwall?

If you think you can provide any more information to help to answer Ron Dingwall's question, please email me to let me know, then I'll pass on Ron's email address to you so that you can send a message to him.    Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  March 26, 2011

 

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