Links to Other Pages

EdinPhoto - Home Page  Please send me an e-mail ...  with your questions, comments, suggestions or news.   At any time, you can search for a word  -  perhaps a photographer's name or a photographic topic.  The search will produce a list of pages on the EdinPhoto web site where this word appears.     At any time, you can search for a word  -  perhaps a photographer's name or a photographic topic.  The search will produce a list of pages on the EdinPhoto web site where this word appears.  

Photographs and Other Images  -  These include portraits of photographers  -  photographic outings -  Princes Street views  -  Newhaven Fishwives  -  etc.  Early Photography in Edinburgh  -  Talbot, Brewster, Hill & Adamson, Early Professional Photographers in Princes Street, etc.  Professional Photographers in Edinburgh  -  1840 to 1940  -  Their names, dates of business and studio addresses.  The Photographic Society of Scotland  -  1856 to 1873  -  Lectures, Exhibitions, Outings, etc.  The History of Edinburgh Photographic Society  -  1861 to date  -  Lectures, Exhibitions, Outings, Poems, etc.  EPS Publications - EPS Handwritten Records  -  Photographic Journals  -  Trade Directories  -  Books  -  etc.  Thanks to all who have encouraged and supported me in creating the EdinPhoto web site  -  including descendants of photographers  -  researchers  -  providers of photographs and other material  Background notes on the research thal led up to the creation of this site  -   together with lists of new material added to the site since its launch.  Brief comments on how this site might be used  -  Just browsing?  -  Seeking specific information?  Please add your questions, suggestions or other comments to the Guest Book.  Links to other web sites  -  Photographic Societies  -  Photographic History  -  Family History  -  etc.  Click here to find the link to the Edinburgh Photogrpahic Society web site.

 

A selection of my photographs, many from Edinburgh throughout the year.   Also photos from Scotland, London, Iceland, Italy, Hong Kong and elsewhere    Many old maps of Edinburgh (Old Town, New Town, while City), Leith and Newhaven.  Includes several old transport maps and a comparison of old maps with recent aerial photos.   Old engravings, mailly of Edinburgh scenes.  Some from the 1820s, some from the 1890s,  some others - includes many hand-coloured examples from the 1820s.   News from Edinburgh today  -  Events, Collections, Buildings and Gardens, Transport   This site includes     1. Post card portraits taken in studios in Edinburgh:    2. Post card views either takeen/published by Ediburgh photographers or views of Edinburgh, or both.y Edinburgh    Views of Edinburgh, grouped into three sections:     1. Street views:    2. Buildings:    3. Around Edinburgh   Views of transport around Edinburgh  -  Horse drawn trams and buses, cable cars, electric trams, buses and a few railway photos.  Also several maps of Edinburgh's bus and tram routes.   Links to pages with Photos of Groups   Frequently Asked Questions

  Summary of the updates added to this site each month since the site was launched   Links to Dumbiedykes pages  Link to Granton pages  Link to Leith pages   Link to Newhaven pages   Links to Portobello pages   Link to My Recent Talks

   

Recollections  -  Edinburgh Old Town

Dumbiedykes

People and Play

   Dumbiedykes Survey Photograph - 1959  -  Between Mid and West Arthur Place ©

1a.

George C R Stevenson
Livingston, West Lothian

'The Scotchie'

The Queen's Park

Clothes

Neighbours

Bonfires

Street Gangs

Church Cubs

Cinemas

One Man Band

1b.

George C R Stevenson
Livingston, West Lothian

Pleasance

Holyrood Square

Friendship

2.

Robert B McNeill
The Inch, Edinburgh

Dumbiedykes Road

Arthur's Seat

3.

George Smith
British Colombia, Canada

Arthur Street

4.

Isa Paulin
Cheshire, England

Children from Holyrood Square

Infirmary Street Baths

Simon's Bakery

5.

Jeanette Boon
Welland, Ontario, Canada

Dumbiedykes Road

-  St Margaret's Church

-  Dumbiedykes Reunion

6.

Kathleen Honan
Slateford, Edinburgh

Homes

Friends

7a.

Eric Gold
known to many as
Eric McKenzie
East End, London

The Scotchie

The Rat Man

Doctor Goldberg

Saturday Nights

Nae Kick the Can

Peevery Beds

Halloween

The Bogeyman

St Margaret's Loch

Toodles, the Cat

7b.

Eric Gold
known to many as
Eric McKenzie
East End, London

Coronation Street Party

8.

James Reid
Entre Naranios, Orhuela, Spain

and reply from

George Smith
British Colombia, Canada

Beaumont Place

Mushy Peas in Vinegar

9.

Bryan Gourlay
Biggar, Lanarkshire, Scotland

Schools

Football

School Dentist

Qualifying Dance

10.

George Smith
British Colombia, Canada

Preston Street School

11a.

Jean Rae née Aithie
Southside, Edinburgh

Old Photos

Schools

Bookie

11b.

Jean Rae née Aithie
Southside, Edinburgh

Out of School

12.

Sharon Fuller
Chatham. Kent

Searching for People - Charles Plank

13.

Jane Jones née Richardson
Cambridgeshire, England

Dr Gordon

14.

Rab Waugh
Queensland, Australia

reply from

Kenny Blackwood

Schools

Emigration to Australia

Photos

15.

Aileen (Alison) McIntosh
née DUFF

Roseburn, Edinburgh

Moray House Theatre

16a.

Peter Bottomley
North Gyle, Edinburgh

'The Embers'  A group from Dumbiedykes ©

'The Embers'

'The Scotchie'

16b.

Eric Gold
East End, London

'The Scotchie'

16c.

John Alexander
Sydney, NSW, Australia

'The Embers'

'The Plastic Meringue'

16d.

Doreen Powell
Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland

'The Plastic Meringue'

17a.

Ken Matthews
formerly Ken Egerton

Glenrothes, Fife, Scotland

'Johnny and the Falcons'

17b.

Frankie Connor

'Johnny and the Falcons'

17c.

Joan Dunn
Charlotte, North Carolina, USA

Your First Guitar  (to Frank Connor)

18a.

Harry Marshall ('Peets')
Tranent, East Lothian

Arthur Street

Memories

Streets and the 'Scotchie'

Young Brothers' Bakery

My Old Mates

18b.

Harry Marshall ('Peets')
Tranent, East Lothian

Arthur Street

Memories

Streets and the 'Scotchie'

Young Brothers' Bakery

My Old Mates

18c.

Daniel Duff

Teeny!  Where are you?

19.

Carol Symonds (née Tierney)
Wales

Dumbiedykes

Dumbiedykes Road

People Remembered

Schools

20.

Helene Waugh
Canongate, Edinburgh

Dumbiedykes

Dumbiedykes Road

People Remembered

Schools

20.
Reply 1

Joan Dunn
Canongate, Edinburgh

Dumbiedykes Road

-  Neighbours

-  Reply to Helene

21a.

Grace Owen

Arthur street

Middle Arthur Place

Doctors, Bonfires and Shops

Do your remember the Owens?

21b.

Grace Owen

and replies from

Tom Harrison
Buckstone, Edinburgh

Mamie Scott (née Carr) and

James A Rafferty
Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland

Arthur street

Middle Arthur Place

Doctors, Bonfires and Shops

Do your remember the Owens?

22.

Jim Robertson

Friends

Shops

Contact

23.

Liz Sproat (née Elizabeth Bell)
Duddingston / Portobello, Edinburgh

Dumbiedykes Road

Family

The Balconies

Christmas Presents

The Store

'The Toffs'

Shops

Move from Dumbiedykes

24.

Tony Henderson
Canada

'The Scotchie'

25.

Catherine McKinsley
(née Calvey)
Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England

The Calvey Family

Move to The Dummy

Friends

Shops

At Play

Willy Allen's Hall

Winter

Little Theatre Club

Move from The Dummy

Questions

26.

Bob Henderson
Burdiehouse, Edinburgh

Chippie

Arthur Street

Coal Deliveries

Bookies

Rag Sorters

New Houses

27.

Eric Gold
known to many as
Eric McKenzie
East End, London

and reply from

Tony Ivanov

St Ann's School

Chippie and Rag Store

Collecting Rags

28.

Eric Gold
known to many as
Eric McKenzie
East End, London

Box Player

Trades Fortnight

Johnny McKenzie

29.

Bob Henderson
Burdiehouse, Edinburgh

Arthur Street - Houses

Arthur Street - Children

30.

Jim Robertson
Berlin, Germany

and replies from

Bob Henderson
Burdiehouse, Edinburgh, and

Eric Gold
East End, London

St Patrick's School

St Patrick's School Class

St Patrick's School Teachers

31.

Jackie Hamilton
Fife, Scotland

and replies from

Joe Jordan
Gracemount, Edinburgh

Tom McLuskey
Shannon Lake, Westbank, British Columbia, Canada

Jackie Hamilton
Fife, Scotland

Joe Jordan
Gracemount, Edinburgh

Joe Jordan
Gracemount, Edinburgh

Eric Gold
East End, London

Arthur Street

Arthur Seat

Museum and Play Park

Hunter Family3

32.

Bob Henderson
Burdiehouse, Edinburgh

Arthur Street

Play Park

Museum

Please click here for recollections 33 onwards

 

 

Dumbiedykes

People & Play

More pages

Maureen Mitchell
née GRAHAM

Gilmerton, Edinburgh

       Gordon, Margaret and Linda in Holyrood Park with Dumbiedykes in the background, around 1953 ©

Holyrood Park and Dumbiedykes

Aileen (Alison) McIntosh
née DUFF

Roseburn, Edinburgh

James Clark School

 

Recollections

1a

George C R Stevenson

Livingston, Scotland

Thank you to George C R H Stevenson, for sending some memories of life in the Dumbiedykes district of Edinburgh from 1953 to 1962.

'The Scotchie'

   Dumbiedykes Survey Photograph - 1959  -  Prospect Street ©

"The hill in the photo was called 'The Scotchie', where we played 'Cowboys and Indians' and 'British and Germans'."

The Queen's Park

The Queen's Park was a tremendous back garden to have.   Beside the Nursery, there was a wall we called the Planny, which you climbed to get down into the park, and came out next to the gas works.

I think there were more Cowboys and Indians playing in the Queen's Park than there ever were in the USA.

When one of yous was tied up front, to be a horse, they sometimes started getting a bit angry 'cause they didn't want to be a horse any more.

I remember four of us climbing to the Cat's Neck on Salisbury Crags, one wearing an Ark Royal Sailor's hat and one called Ronnie with a 2nd World War Infantry Helmet.  We had a photo of the attire which I might find one day.

When I sometimes take my dog for a walk round the Radical Road, Salisbury Crags, it makes me think how fearless we must have been then, 'cause there's no way you would get me up there now."

Clothes

"My brother and I must have looked a picture back then as we both had to wear German lederhosen, our Mum being German.  Our Granny and Grandad brought them over from Germany.

We were taunted for a while - then it stopped as everybody saw they were good for sliding down the Scotchie and down from the Radical Road Crags to the bottom in Queen's Park.

My uncle John, I think it was, gave me and my brother an old leopard skin.  I jumped out a few times with it tied on to me, to give people a fright in the stair.  That was soon stopped.  Our leopard skin died a sudden death.  Our cat, Smokey, peed on it, and it was put in the bin.

Neighbours

"There were a lot of foreign people living in our area at that time.  I remember there were quite a few Ukrainian families -  Mycko, Kurluch,  ..."

I was pleased to receive an e-mail in June 2005 from Ian Mycko, Gilmerton, Edinburgh, formerly of Dumbiedykes, asking for help in contacting George Stevenson who wrote the recollections above.  I hope that contact has now been established. 

Over the past couple of years, I have received several e-mails from around the world with fond memories of Dumbiedykes in the mid-1900s.

 

Bonfires

"Bonfire time was quite a caper, collecting, and borrowing from other street gangs, what would now be classed as vintage furniture, worth a fortune"

Street Gangs

"The street gangs were not gangs that beat up little old ladies or did any harm.  There were

-  The 'Squaries' from Holyrood Square.

-  The 'Drummond Street Gang'.

-  The 'Easties' and 'Westies' from Arthur Street.

I think we were called the 'Middlies'.  We made tomahawks out of roof slates and a piece of stick."

Church Cubs

"My brother and I joined the 40th St Margaret's Church Cubs.  The Church was next to Salteri's dairy.  The Minister was Revd. Duncan Shaw, who became the Moderator of the Church of Scotland.

The man who ran the Cubs was Mr Bird.  We enjoyed going to the Cubs.  There was always plenty to do.

My brother and I were kindly doing 'bob a job' for the cubs charity.  We went into the undertakers at the bottom of St Mary's Street and asked  for a 'bob a job'.  The  undertaker replied:  "Aye you can go down the stairs and polish the coffins." We broke Roger Bannister's Mile Record running back down to Lower Viewcraig Row.

It all came to an end when we got shifted into a palace - a house with a bath, three rooms and a garden in the Inch.

Cinemas

"Does anyone remember the fleahoose - the New Palace cinema?   A fishwife used to sell  mussels and pokes of buckies at the corner of St Mary's Street.

We all used to buy them.  After you ate them with a pin to get them out, they were good 'amo' for throwing at each other in the cinema, which became a market and McGoo's Night Club.

The cleaners must have had an awful job sweeping them up.  Sorry, I'm one of the guilty ones.

Also, there was a scabbylala La Scala, where a  toothless ice cream lady often cried out: "If you don't shut up, you will get a skelping."

One Man Band

"Does anyone remember the busker 'one man band'?  He used to have a clown's face painted on, and on the back of his jacket was just a square."

George C R H Stevenson

Livingston, West Lothian, Scotland,  May 2005

 

Recollections

1b

George C R Stevenson

Livingston, Scotland

Six months after sending the above recollections, George Stevenson wrote again with more memories of Dumbiedykes.  His message was sent on 29 November 2005, his birthday and the day before he returned to sea again:

Pleasance

   Dumbiedykes Survey Photograph - 1959  -  Waste ground behind The Pleasance ©

"My brother thinks that my sister and I might be in the Pleasance waste ground photo, which was at the back end of Scotchie Hill.

Maybe, maybe not."

Holyrood Square

  Photograph oh Holyrood Square, Dumbiedykes, Edinburgh, provided by Isa Paulin, Cheshire, formerly of Dumbiedykes ©

I remember when they were digging the foundations for the new skyscrapers that they built in Holyrood Square, we played at "Germans and British, Japs and Americans".

There was a boy called Ronnie who stayed down from Yardley's.  He always wanted to be the big chief.  Maybe he became a brigadier in the Army.

I'm sure somebody told me in later years that Holyrood Square was a barracks  -  horses and all  -  in Victorian days.  Interesting.  I don't know if it's fact.

Friendship

"There was something about everyone who lived in the Dumbiedykes area.

We were neighbours of the Queen and family - Holyrood Palace !!!

We might not have been well off, but we didn't have to go and borrow some sugar from her."

George C R H Stevenson

Livingston, West Lothian, Scotland,  29 November 2005

 

Recollections

2

Robert B McNeill

The Inch, Edinburgh

Thank you to Robert B McNeill, Edinburgh, for the following details.

Robert writes:

Dumbiedykes Road

   Demolition of 134-135 Dumbiedykes Road ©

"One of the local 'worthies' former residents might remember was a lady called Jenny Ellison (or Allison, I'm not sure how her surname was spelt).

Jenny had a son called Dod (who I think worked in the Cleansing Dept) and both stayed at the ground floor flat at 144 Dumbiedykes Road.

 Jenny spoke with a bit of a lisp and could always be seen at her window having wee blether. Kids would occasionally try to 'knock a rise' out of Jenny by mimicking the way she spoke (only to be sent on their way with an an 'earful').

Like most Dumbiedykes residents, Jenny and Dod were genuinely nice folk (and also incredibly tolerant!).

Arthur's Seat

"I was interested to read a former Southsider's comments re 'The Scotchie'. I know the part of Arthur's Seat referred to. I think the crevice in the rock above was called either 'The Chimney' or 'The Cat's Nick'. Many's the time my pals and I risked life and limb climbing from the path (the Radical Road) to the top end at Hunter's Bog.

Despite the overcrowding, there was a great community spirit in the Southside. I very much appreciate the site and the photographs

If anyone who stayed in the area has old pictures, I do hope they'll consider submitting them.

Robert B McNeill.  The Inch, Edinburgh, 31 August 2005

 

Recollections

3

George Smith

British Colombia, Canada

Thank you to George Smith of British Columbia, Canada, formerly Edinburgh, who wrote:

Arthur Street

    Dumbiedykes Survey Photograph - 1959  - Arthur Street with lemonade lorry ©

"Recent material about Dumbiedykes brought back some family memories.

My cousin who lived in Arthur Street also managed to let go the hand brake of his father's (Co-Op/Store) lorry but managed to avert catastrophe at the last minute by applying his juvenile feet to the footbrake and come to a stop before hitting the fence at the bottom".

George Smith, Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, British Colombia, Canada.

4 September 2005.

 

Recollections

4

Isa Paulin

Cheshire, England

Thank you to Isa Paulin for sending me the photograph of some of the children from Holyrood Square.  Isa wrote:

Children from Holyrood Square

  Photograph of children from  Holyrood Square, Dumbiedykes, Edinburgh, provided by Isa Paulin, Cheshire, one of the children in the photo. ©

"Here is a photo of some kids from Holyrood Square who may just recognise themselves.  I reckon this was taken round about 1940 and was in Holyrood Park."

Please click on the picture above to enlarge it and to read some of the names provided by Isa.

Infirmary Street Baths

and

Simon's Bakery

I wonder if anyone remembers Simon's Bakery in St. Mary Street.

At Milton House Primary School our class went every week to Infirmary Street Baths for our swimming lesson and on the way back to school the highlight of the day was to pop into Simon's for our 'shivery bite' which was a mince pie topped with baked beans. 

I can still taste it now, the gravy running down our chins - just heaven, especially on a cold winter's day!!

 Isa Paulin, Cheshire, England:  20 November 2005

 

Recollections

5

Jeanette Boon

Canada

Thank you to Jeanette Boon, now living in Canada for sending me the following comments on this photograph.

Jeanette wrote:

St Margaret's Church

   Dumbiedykes Survey Photograph - 1959  -  Prospect Street and St Margaret's Church ©

This photograph is of Prospect Street and St. Margaret's Church.  I used to attend this church.

I'm sure a lot of people will remember Miss Riley, the Sunday school teacher.  She always wore a grey skirt and jacket.  I used to think she was a nun.

  Prospect Terrace from the north, and the side of St Margaret's Church ©

This photograph is of  Prospect Terrace.  This was right next to Lower Viewcraig Row.  You can see the church on the left side of this photo.

This was the spot where the bride and groom came out of the church to a waiting car.  We were always there for the "poor-oot" 

The groom would throw money out of the car as it took off.  What a scramble to get some.

It was good to receive an e-mail and the photograph below from Jeanette Boon (formerly Jeanette Keighren) who used to live at Dumbiedykes).

Jeanette left Edinburgh in 1957 and now lives in Welland, Ontario, Canada, about twenty minutes from Niagara Falls.

Jeanette wrote:

 Reunion in Canada

"I lived at 65 Lower Viewcraig Row with my parents, three sisters and a brother.  My name then was Jeanette Keighren."

Dumbiedykes Survey Photograph - 1959  -  Lower Viewcraig Row, with an arrow pointing to Number 65, First Balcony ©

"My husband and I are now retired teachers.  We have three children (teachers) and six grand children."

Dumbiedykes Reunion
 in Canada

  Edinburgh History  -   Recollections  -  Dumbiedykes reunion in Canada ©

"We had a reunion at my house in Canada, of five ladies from Dumbiedykes. 

They were:

the Campbell ladies
from  Prospect Place
both now living in Canada

-  the Paulin' ladies
from  Holyrood Square
one now living in England,
the other still in Edinburgh.

- Jeanette Boon (myself)
formerly Jeanette Keighren
from Lower Viewcraig Row."

"We got in touch with each other through 'Friends Reunited'.

We all went to Milton House School and then James Clarks.  Our ages now range from 60 to 70.

Reading some of the comments from George Stevenson, especially about the Scotchie and Yardley's shop took me back in time.

I would like to know what number he lived at and when."

Jeanette:

George lived in Dumbiedykes from 1953 to 1962.  His address was 65 Lower Viewcraig Row ,the same address as yours, but beginning about two years after you left!

Peter Stubbs

 

Recollections

6

Kathleen Honan

Slateford, Edinburgh

Looking for people who grew up in Dumbiedykes

Kathleen Honan hopes to make contact again with some of the people she knew when she grew up in the Dumbiedykes area of Edinburgh.

If you would like to respond to the message below, please e-mail me and I will forward your message to Kathleen.

Kathleen wrote:

Homes

I lived with my granny in Lower Viewcraig Row, Dumbiedykes, in a top flat, No. 52.  My granny's name was Farrell.

My mother and father lived in Adam Street.  We had the ladies hairdressers, just off Adam Street, next to the nursery, but i spent all of my time at Lower View.

Dumbiedykes was a place never to be forgotten. 

Friends

I've been trying for ages to make contact with someone from Dumbiedykes.

I am already in contact with Helen Whitehead  who lived in Prospect Terrace or Place.  We have been pals since we  were  twelve.

The only people I can think of are Rab Sneddon, Jimmy Logan, Billy Cockburn, Gordon May and Johnny Christie.

Kathleen Honan:  30 August 2005

Slateford, Edinburgh (for the past 35 years)

Response 1

Thank you to Margaret Stevens, formerly Margaret Rutherford of Arthur Street for responding to the request above.  Margaret still lives in Edinburgh and will be aged  60 in 2006.

Margaret:  I've forwarded your message to Kathleen

- Peter Stubbs:  February 18, 2006.

Response 2

Thank you to Bill Cockburn for sending me a message for Kathleen Honan.   Bill, who, now lives in  Comely Bank, Edinburgh, tells me that it is nearly 40 years since he was last in touch with Kathleen.

Bill:  I've forwarded your message to Kathleen.

 - Peter Stubbs:  April 14, 2007.

Response 3

Thank you to Danny Duff for letting me know where Rab Sneddon works now.

Danny:  I've forwarded your message to Kathleen.

 - Peter Stubbs:  February 3 2008

 

Update  -  May 2007

I'm pleased to have now received another message from Bill Cockburn.

Bill wrote:

Meeting

"I've been busy blethering with Kathleen Honan, and we are arranging a meet up with Jimmy Logan and Helen Whitehead, after about 47 years.

All this is thanks to your website, for which I will be for ever grateful."

 - Bill Cockburn, Comely Bank, Edinburgh  May 9, 2007.

     

Recollections

7a

Eric Gold

East End, London

Thank you to Eric Gold who lived at East Arthur Place from 1948 until 1961 for the following.  Eric wrote:

'The Scotchie'

    Dumbiedykes Survey Photograph - 1959  -  Prospect Place ©

"There was the 'Scotchie' of course - a hill on waste ground at Prospect Place. 

We would play there and the bonfires were lit on the brae.  We would play 'Kick the Can'."

'The Rat Man'

"On the middle of the brae there was Mr Wilson, an old man and a recluse.  He used to feed the rats.  Mind you, he did not have to do this as the rats always had a slap up meal in the backies (back greens) as people would throw their rubbish out of the window wrapped in a newspaper in to the backie and the rats would wait patiently for this).

However, as a few people complained about this man he was moved from the middle of the brae to the bottom of the brae opposite Cowan's paper factory.  And would you believe it, the rats followed him too so they could get fed.  The man was then eventually put in a mental home.

We had a huge cat called Toodles and he was a great rat killer.  The dogs would run away from him when he strolled down the brae and along Eastie (East Arthur Place).  What a great cat he was."

The following recollections have been taken from Joe Jordan's comments in the EdinPhoto guestbook:

Mr Wilson

"Eric Gold referred to Mr Wilson as an old recluse.  In fact, he stayed in the house with his wife and family.  They flitted to No 3, East Arthur Place, top flat, along the lobby from the Fairs."

Rats and Mice

"Eric referred to Mr Wilson as 'The Rat Man'.   In fact, the whole area was infested with rats.  The rats kept to the ground floor.  The mice were in the rest of the tenements."

Demolition

"When the final demolition took place, the Wilsons moved down to Prestonfield.  When the end came, we were all scattered to the four winds, but I still keep in touch with some of the old gang."

Joe Jordan, Gracemount, Edinburgh:  Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook:
  August 4, 2010

 

Dr Goldberg

"Our family Doctor was Dr Myer Goldberg. He was a personal friend to my grandparents and was a very funny man with a great sense of humour.  He would curse and swear to a lot of his patients.

I remember our neighbour in the next lobbie (lobby) and her name was Maggie Taylor and she was dying of cancer, a great loss to our family and all concerned. Well Doctor Goldberg was at her side with her family to the end and was cracking jokes and swearing as usual to defuse the horrible dilemma that the Taylor family were in.

A priest was called in to give Maggie the last rights, and Doctor Goldberg said to the priest from St Patrick's chapel, 'What are you doing here?  You are not a doctor or a specialist. What will a bit mumbo jumbo from a Bible do to cure this so-and-so disease (he used several rude words).

Anyway, the priest gave Maggie the Last Rights and she was laughing with Doctor Goldberg's rude remarks, then passed away with my mum at her side too.

The priest was Father McNeill and later became a Cardinal in Ireland.  Doctor Goldberg and he were great mates and my mother always said they staged the whole thing just to give anyone in Maggie's position a wee laugh before they passed over.

They had a great bond and respect for each other. Doctor Goldberg went to Edinburgh University studying Medicine, and Father McNeil went to Oxford or Cambridge studying Law. and even although he graduated, he decided to become a priest.   What a fantastic priest and human being too, full of Irish humour.

Dr Goldberg was the greatest GP that I have ever met and we stayed on his books until he retired in 1964."

It is ironic that a Roman catholic Priest and a Jewish Doctor were great mates.   I used to say to the bosses at the BBC and the Captains on the huge liners that I worked on, 'If the politicians in various countries would get on like them, then there would be no wars' and they all said 'You are right.' "

Saturday Nights

"On a Saturday night there was always a street sing song in the summer and Saturday night parties as the pub at the top of the brae would close at 10 pm.

The pub was called 'Hares' and was owned by John Richmond.

On the Monday I would take the empty bottles called skrewtops, or as we said in Eastie skrewtaps, back to Mr Richmond and we would get a penny per bottle.

I would also cut up old firewood and sell it at the doors."

'Nae Kick the Can'

"I remember as a kid we would play a hide and seek game.  We called it 'Nae Kick the Can'. 

Our team would put a tin can on the brae and hide in the stairwell.  The other team would appoint a stooge to look after the can.  We would try to run out and kick it.

If the stooge saw one of our team before we got to the can, they would kick the can down the brae and say "Come oot where ever yi are the game is up the pole." meaning they had won."

'Peevery Beds'

"The girls had there own game called Peevery beds.  I'm sure it is called hopscotch in England.

They would chalk up squares and put a tin in the centre and skip the tin along the squares but if it landed on a line then the girl would be out of there team and lose points."

Halloween

"When it was Halloween we would go out guising and I would dress up as a pirate and my cousin would dress up as teddy boy, he had a fantastic singing voice (better than the rubbish we have today).

We would go in to all the pubs and sing.  We made a few shillings and even Mrs Booth would ask "Sing Rose Marie."  She was so impressed that she gave us a 10 shilling note which in these days was worth a few bob."

The Bogeyman
Queen's Park

"In Scotland the bogyman was a fictitious character, say a ghost.  When we would play in the Queens Park or sometimes called the Kings park depending who was on the throne at the time, on the long summer nights my mum like any other mum would like us all in fed and washed and to bed we would go.

At the bottom off the brae, just inside, there was the parkie's hoose (park keepers house) and my mum would say the bogyman lived there and if you don't come up the brae and in to the house by a certain time he will come out and catch you and put you in a bag, by God that myth always worked for us kids."

St Margaret's Loch
Queen's Park

"We would go down to St Margaret's loch and go on the rowing boats.  It was great. There used to be a paddling pool for the bairns, but that is now gone.

 I also remember there was a well in the hill above.  It was like a big boulder and the water was fresh.

There was also St Margaret's well with railings but it was not kept nice."

'Toodles' the cat
in
Queen's Park

"Our cat, Toodles, was the biggest cat in Arthur Street.  He would follow us down to the loch as he knew we would buy a poke of the ice cream and he would want a one too, so we always gave him one.

He would also chase the sheep in the park and other dogs too (ha ha ha).  My mother got him as a kitten of a hawker (gypsy or tinker) who was selling tea towels and other household goods.

The gypsy women said: "I believe there are many mice and rats in Arthur street and if you buy this kitten for a shilling you won't get any at all."

Rumour has it that Toodles was the son of a Scottish wild cat.  The local vet, The Dick Vet, at the Meadows said he had never seen a cat so large and intelligent in his life as a veterinary surgeon

Toodles' luck run out as he was in a fight with a dozen rats.  Although he killed many, one bit him. He was poisoned and his health deteriorated and the vet said he had to put him down due to his age and illness.  I have never seen my mum so upset."

 Eric Gold, East End, London:  February 2 to19, 2006

 

Recollections

7b

Eric Gold

East End, London

Eric contacted me again, on reading in the guest book that a photograph of a 1953 Coronation Street Party in Dumbiedykes had been found.

I hope to be able to add this photo to the web site soon.

Eric wrote:

Coronation Street Party

"I remember Arthur Street was all decked out with flags on that day.  I got a Coronation Mug and five bob piece (crown).  It was solid silver. 

Knowing my mum, as we were poor, she probably sold it (ha ha ha) bless her."

"In Eastie (East Arthur Place) we had a great Coronation Party as all the tables were lined up and we had plenty to eat and drink (soft drinks)."

 Eric Gold, East End, London:  April 21, 2006 + July 1, 2006

 

Dumbiedykes

Please click below to read more comments from Eric Gold about:

-   Growing up in Dumbiedykes and

-   Shops in Dumbiedykes.

 

Recollections

8

James Reid

Entre Naranjos, Oriheula, Spain

Thank you to James Reid, now living in Spain for adding the message below to the EdinPhoto guest book.

James wrote:

Beaumont Place

"I lived in 6 Beaumont place up to 1955 or so.  I remember the the big wooden beams holding up said building. "

Mushy Peas in Vinegar

"I remember the old woman selling mushy peas in vinegar on corner opposite the brewery on St Leonards Street ."

 James Reid: Entre Naranjos, Orihuela, Spain March 10, 200

Reply from

George Smith

British Columbia, Canada

That was quick! I received an e-mail from George Smith, British Columbia, Canada, about six hours after adding the  recollections above to the web site.

George wrote:

Beaumont Place

"Is it possible for me to contact James Reid in Spain by e-mail?

My grandparents and my aunts lived at 6 Beaumont Place and I wonder if he recollects either the Lawsons or Russels who were there from early 1900's to the collapse in 1956."

 George Smith, British Columbia, Canada:  March 11, 2006

James  -  if you read this and would like George to contact you, please e-mail me, so that I can forward your e-mail address to him.

Peter Stubbs:  - March 11, 2006

 

Recollections

9

Bryan Gourlay

Biggar, Lanarkshire, Scotland

Thank you to Bryan Gourlay for his recollections.  Brian wrote:

Schools

"I grew up in Kirkhill Terrace, Priestfield, near the Prestonfield House Hotel, Edinburgh.

I went to Preston Street Primary School, which is still there.  It's the imposing red sandstone building on the corner of East Preston Street and Dalkeith Road.

Preston Street School ©

Around three-quarters of my primary schoolmates came from the St Leonards and Dumbiedykes areas.

Other schools in the Dumbiedykes area were:

- in St Leonards, now gone.  More kids from the Dumbiedykes would probably have gone here. It was between Forbes Street and St Leonards Hill behind where the new St Leonards police station is today.  You can just see the school at the right-hand side of this picture:

Dumbiedykes District  -  Forbes Street  -  1959 ©

-  in Davie Street, off West Richmond Street.  That building is still there, used for some other educational purpose.

the big school, between Drummond Street and Infirmary Street, next to Infirmary Street Baths.

-   a small school near Lower Viewcraig Row, perhaps long gone.

-   in the Canongate,  not that far away and close to the new Scottish Parliament, Milton House Public School - now the Royal Mile Primary School.

Royal Mile Primary School (formerly Milton House Public School) from the NW ©

There were kids from both sides of the tracks at Preston Street in the early 1950s. Many from the so-called, less well-off streets such as Arthur Street, Brown Street, Carnegie Street, Forbes Street, Parkside Street, Montague and Rankeillor Streets etc., and us from the so-called, better-off areas to the south, from Dalkeith Road and Priestfield.

Looking back, what was great, is how the kids from very different backgrounds and privileges got on so well together. It didn't make any difference to us where you came from, or how well-dressed you were.  It never crossed our minds.

Football

"We just got on and made friends in the normal way, and played in the school football team together - which trained at Nelsons Printing Works' pitch where the Commonwealth Swimming Pool is now, on Dalkeith Road - or went as a crowd to Infirmary Street Baths

The football strip consisted of just a very old, unwashed, mothball-smelling, probably pre-War, navy blue jersey, with holes in it, which was handed out from a big cardboard box each Friday afternoon, if you were in the Saturday team.  That was how you found out if your were in the team.  If you got a jersey you were in, if you didn't, you were out. My mother would wash the jersey immediately I got home.

Mr McLaren was the teacher in charge of football. Unlike today's designer, track-suited coaches, he was only ever seen in his three-piece lounge suit and highly polished black shoes - and trilby hat when he ventured outside to impart his considerable footballing skills.

School Dentist

"I can remember being led to the school in Forbes Street around 1952 to see the school dentist who had set up shop there.

He drilled a back tooth, without injection of course, and filled it with some horrible dark metal stuff. It had me in agony for days afterwards, until my mother took me to a proper dentist to get it redone."

Qualifying Dance

A big attraction for me was Montague Street, off St Leonards Street, where my first girlfriend lived, at the time of the 'qualifying dance'.

It all came to an end when we went off to secondary school in 1954.  Those of us who passed the 'qualifying' (11-plus) went to Boroughmuir at Viewforth - and, those who didn't, went to 'Jimmie Clarks' at the top of St Leonards Lane.

Bryan Gourlay, Biggar, Lanarkshire, Scotland;
March 30 + April 2 + April 17 + July 1, 2006

 

Recollections

10

George T Smith

British Columbia, Canada

Thank you to George Smith for his recollections.  Brian wrote:

Preston Street School

"Here is a small uncorroborated  item.

My uncle who attended Preston Street school in the early 1900's.

   Preston Street School ©

He  was summoned to the headmaster's office for some infraction (truanting  I believe) and managed to escape by means of a window.  (The family tale is  that it was on the top floor)

When later recovered, he was found to be an " incorrigible" and sent off to sea on one of Salvesen's whale  ships "to make a man of him".

He was very keen on horses and went truanting to go out with the carters from St Leonards.  He later  became a cavalry man in the Scots Greys and ended up as a Co-op  carter/deliveryman.

I find this an interesting slant on how to handle juvenile 'crime' and have to admire the initiative to climb down via the rone pipe, no doubt from the Head's study."

George Smith, Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, British Colombia, Canada.

April 6, 2006

 

Recollections

11a

Jean Rae (née Aithie)

Thank you to Jean Rae for his recollections.  Jean wrote:

"I really enjoyed looking at this web-site. I sat for a good long time looking at the photographs and enjoying the memories they brought back.  I would love to hear from anyone who remembers me or my family."

If you would like to contact Jean, please e-mail me and I will forward your message or e-mail address to her.

Old Photos

"I have various photographs of  people in  Dumbiedykes, including photos of

  The Coronation Party 1953

-  'Embers', a local band who used to practice in the old stable at Waterson Avenue

-    Myself and other local children playing in the streets.

I  have e-mailed Jean and asked if she would be happy for me to add some of her photos to this web site.    - Peter Stubbs, April 2006

I've now added Jean's photos to the web site.  Here are a couple of them, one taken on the balcony outside her home at 2nd Balcony, 34 Dumbiedykes Road and the other of her father and two other workers from William Waugh, Metal Merchants, Dumbiedykes Road  - Peter Stubbs, October 2006  

Thank you , Jean.

Jean Rae on the Second Balcony at 34 Dumbiedykes Road, around 1955 ©    Three workers from William Waugh, Metal Merchants, 6 and 8, Dumbiedykes Road ©

The Bookie

"My dad used to work in Waugh's scrap metal yard at the foot of the road just before Holyrood Rd. and I remember going with him to the bookie's runner at Holyrood Square (unknown to my mum)."

Schools

"I went to Moray House Nursery then to Moray House School and then to 'Jimmies'. "

Jean Rae (née Aithie), Southside, Edinburgh.

Message in Guest Book:  April 15, 2006

 

Recollections

11b

Jean Rae (née Aithie)

Thank you to Jean Rae for providing photographs in October 2006, including the following from the 1950s:

Out of School

   A group of nine children at Dumbiedykes in the mid-1950s ©    A group of six children at Dumbiedykes in the mid-1950s ©

 

Recollections

12

Sharon Fuller

Chatham, Kent, England

Please e-mail me, or e-mail the address below, if you can help with the following:

Searching for People  -  Charles Plank

"I was wondering if someone could help me.  My father used to live at 10 Dumbiedykes Road with his Aunt Mary. 

My father's name was Charles Plank.  He was born in 1933 and was an only child.  His mother came from Leith.  Her maiden name was White.

Please e-mail me at sharonfuller@blueyonder.co.uk if you can help.  If I'm lucky, I might find some family I never knew I had.

 Thank you very much."

Messages  from Sharon Fuller, Chatham Ken, England:
1. Guest book April 29, 2006.    2. by e-mail April 30, 2006.

Update

Message for Sharon Fuller

I received a message from  Margaret McLeod yesterday telling me that she had some information about your father which she would like to pass on to her.  So I gave her the latest email address that I have for you, but that's now more than seven years old and seems to be no longer active.

So, if you read this, can you please email me to let me know your latest email address, then I'll pass it on to Margaret.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  October 25, 2013

 

Recollections

13

Jane Jones (née Richardson)

Cambridgeshire, England

Thank you to Jane Jones (née Richardson), now living in Cambridgeshire for the sending the following message.

Jane wrote this message after reading mention of Dr Gordon and Dr McQueen in a note by Stan Urbaniak.

Dr Gordon

"I too remember Dr Gordon and Dr McQueen.  Dr Gordon was a bit of a character, and often visited our home in the Cowgate if he was in the area.

He loved children and especially my brother John, who at the time was aged about 2 years old. He would wrestle with Dr Gordon in the middle of our living room floor, which was quite a feat as the good Doctor was quite a large man, and our "back kitchen" was quite a small room.

If you went to his surgery, (in those days you didn't make appointments), you entered by the waiting room, and left by another door from the examination room straight on to the street.

People would  put there heads in the waiting room door and ask "McQueen or Gordon" if the answer was Gordon they usually made a quick exit.

Dr Gordon was well known to tell (in a very loud voice), any malingering man who wanted a sick note "Get yourself back to work man and feed your wife and bairnes, there's nothing wrong with you".  This was followed by a quick exit of the offending individual and a slamming of the street door.

When we moved to "England" my Mother visited the local Doctor after registering with him, and was very embarrassed to be shown a letter our new Doctor had received from Dr Gordon.  It said:

"It is a waste of time me sending the medical records of this woman and her children as she is a good Scots woman and will be back home as soon as she comes to her senses".

He was right we returned to Edinburgh three times before my Mother finally settled in Cambridgeshire. Over the years I have had many Doctors but none quite like Dr Gordon, we loved him and his straight talking ways."

Jane Jones (née Richardson), Cambridgeshire, England:  October 1, 2006

 

Recollections

14

Rab Waugh

Queensland, Australia

Thank you to Rab Waugh, now living in Queensland Australia, for sending the following message.

Rab wrote

"I just happened to click on the Dumbiedykes pages, and I'm over the moon."

Schools

"I'm Rab Waugh.  I was born in 1937 and lived at no 35 Dumbiedykes Road.  I went Milton Hoose School, where I was in the same class as Jimmy Paulin, the brother of Isa Paulin who has written to your web site.  Jimmy had a brilliant brain and was an excellent scholar, but so were all the Paulins.

Then I went to  Boroughmuir then to 'Jimmies'.  We moved to the Canongate aboot 1955."

Emigration to Australia

"Now I live in Queensland, Australia.  Here, they now call me Bobbie.  I've met a few  from 'the Dumbie' over here:

-   Mike  Moncrieff  -  He's now in New Zealand.  He lived next door to me at No. 35, the 'Brickies'', Dumbiedykes.

-   George Gibson from No. 52, the 'Balconies', Dumbiedykes.  He was in one of the posh houses with a main door."

Photos

"I'm sending three old photos of very poor quality, but someone may recognise a familiar face.

The surname of the five sisters was Rawley.   Bella was my mother. I think they all lived in the first "coort", Dumbiedykes Road.

The Rawley Sisters

The five Rawley sisters, Dumbiedykes

© Rab Waugh, Queensland, Australia

The two pics below were taken in the first "coort", Dumbiedykes Road:

Group 1  -  'First Coort'

A group of children at 'First Coort', Dumbiedykes Road

© Rab Waugh, Queensland, Australia

Group 2  -  'First Coort'

A group of children at 'First Coort', Dumbiedykes Road

© Rab Waugh, Queensland, Australia

I remember many of the names, such as:

-  the Blackwoods from the 2nd coort, Rab played for Hearts

Tommy Connoly

Stuart Hardy

Ann Bremner

Rab Gilhooley

Archie and Pat Young

to mention but a few."

Rab Waugh, Queensland Australia:  January 13, 2007

Rab Waugh says:

"I'd be delighted to hear from anyone from around the Dumbiedykes, Holyrood, Canongate or nearby areas, or anyone who went to Milton House or 'Jimmies' school."

If you'd like to contact Rab, please send your message by e-mail to me then I'll forward it to Rab.

-  Peter Stubbs:  January 13, 2007.

UPDATE

Reply from

Kenny Blackwood

Kenny Blackwood, the youngest of the Blackwood Brothers mentioned above has contacted me.

Kenny writes:

Dumbiedykes Road

"I just came across your site yesterday .  It brings back a lot of memories.  I'm the youngest of the Blackwoods referred to in Rab Waugh's speel.

We stayed at 41 Dumbiedykes Rd in the "second coort", leaving in 1957 to move into a modern terraced house in Gracemount.   An indoor toilet was quite a luxury! 

Family

"My two sisters, Lena Ross and Betty Pearson are still in Edinburgh but sadly all my brothers John (Jerry), Robert (Bobby), James and Eric have  passed on."

Contemporaries

"Some of my contemporaries from then have been mentioned:

-  Peter Bottomley

-  Jamesie Fraser

Gordon Graham.

Others I remember are:

-  John Bell, whose father had a blacksmith business in the Grassmarket

-   George Shaw, who I see from time to time

-  Brian Gilhooley, who is with me on the right of this photograph. 

I think it was probably taken outside our window at No. 41 around 1955."

Kenny Blackwood and Brian Gilhooley at 41 Dumbiedykes Road around 1955 ©

Milton House Photo

"Here is a Milton House school photograph from 1957."

A school cass at Milton House School 1957  -  photographed by Norman Watson ©

Kenny Blackwood:  March 21, 2007

Please click on either of the photos above to enlarge them.

 

Recollections

15

Aileen (Alison) McIntosh née DUFF

Roseburn, Edinburgh

Thank you to Aileen McIntosh for the recollections below.

Aileen wrote:

Moray House Theatre

"We used to go the Youth Club in the Moray House Theatre.

There was an excellent Club for the boys for many years and some people did try to set up a club for girls.  It was great.  We used to play rounders there too.

I don't know if my memory is correct or not , but I'm sure there used to be a little cemetery in the grounds of the Theatre in the mid-1950s.  It's a fair bit back.  Maybe we were told that so we would keep out!! 

I think there may have been an old Church at the corner of the Arthur Street and The Pleasance which backed on to the Theatre property."

 

Recollections

16a

Peter Bottomley

North Gyle, Edinburgh

Thank you to Peter Bottomley, the one on the right in this photograph of  'The Embers' band, for sending me his memories of Dumbiedykes.

'The Embers'

   'The Embers'  A group from Dumbiedykes ©

Peter remembers  'The Scotchie', the hill in the photograph below and the area of level wasteland at the top of the hill.

'The Scotchie'

   Dumbiedykes Survey Photograph - 1959  -  Prospect Place ©

Peter wrote:

'The Scotchie'

"The 'Scotchie' was used as a gambling area and boys were used as lookouts, in case the polis arrived.

If they did everybody would run like hell as it was illegal."

Peter Bottomley,  January 19, 2007

 

Recollections

16b

Eric Gold

East End, London

Eric Gold also remembers the men gambling on 'The Scotchie'  Eric, a jazz music enthusiast, writes:

'The Scotchie'

"I have good hearing.  If I was at the top of the brae in Arthur Street I could hear a mouse in the Parkie's Hoose.

That's why the men gambling used me as a Shottie in the Scotchie to hear and see the polis coming (ha ha ha)"

Eric Gold, East London:  February 1, 2007

 

Recollections

16c

John Alexander

Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Thank you to John Alexander for sending this message.

John wrote:

'The Embers'

"I am an old friend of 'Bommy' and 'Hushy', and for a short time did some art work for the 'Embers'.  I worked with the guys in Ferranti in the mid- sixties.

It's great to see Bommy and the boys are still alive and kicking.  So sad about  'Linnie Paterson', late the 'Wall'.

Its a shame the Embers were not mentioned in Brian Hogg's 'The History of Scottish Rock and Pop' as they were a 'Top' Edinburgh band."

'The Plastic Meringue'

With Bob Clark, Bruce Moyes, Stu Caplan (all Ferranti) we started a Ferranti band 'The Plastic Meringue'.

John Alexander, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia:  March

 

Recollections

16d

Doreen Powell

Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland

Thank you to Doreen Powell, now living in Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland, for sending this photograph of the band that her brother played in, in the 1960s.

The Plastic Meringue  -  Edinburgh 1960s Band ©

Doreen wrote:

Plastic Meringue

"The band member Bob Clark is my brother.  I can remember the hours of practice he did at home.  Some of the clubs and bands on the site also bring back many memories for me.

Doreen Powell, Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland:  February 24, 2009

 

Recollections

17a

Ken Matthews
formerly Ken Egerton

Glenrothes, Fife, Scotland

Thank you to Ken Matthews, formerly Ken Egerton, now living in Glenrothes, Fife, Scotland for:

-  the message below.

-  further comments in 'Recollectons 65'.

Ken wrote:

Johnny and the Falcons

"I lived in Dumbiedykes Road.  I think it was number 98, on the third floor.  I lived with my granny Gertrude Lawrie.

I was sent to a Military School in Dover.  When I returned (1958) I formed a rock-n-roll group called 'Johnny and the Falcons'.

I was rhythm guitarist and Johnny Campbell was the singer. Johnny was affiliated to the Leith Street Gang (Jimmy Divott et al).

Our lead Guitarist was Frankie Connor who lived at the top of Arthur Street in the Pleasance.  Eventually we had a drummer join us, called Danny Lynch, although if memory serves, Rab Sneddon did a wee bit of drumming with us in the early days."

Please see 17b (below) for comments from Frank Connor, mentioned above.

Frank adds: "We knew Ken Matthews as Kenny Egerton."

 

Recollections

17b

Frank Connor

Here, Frank recalls the Edinburgh music scene in the 1950s/60s.  Then he was known as Frankie.

Frank writes

Edinburgh Music Groups

I was in 'Johnny and the Falcons' mainly through the fact that Jim Di Mambro introduced me to all the others.

I was a member of the 'Edinburgh Crusaders' for three years before ending up in the big band in the Edinburgh Palais and moving on from there. I knew all the lads in the 'Embers' very well.

I think that 'Johnny and the Falcons' was one of the first rock groups in the town back in 1958/9, us and the 'Blackjacks'.
I didn't know of any others at the time.

In Edinburgh, I started a joinery apprenticeship at Charlie Linton's in the Pleasance.   After finishing the apprenticeship, I stayed on the tools for another three years before I went on to becoming a full time musician.

My musical career took me all over the world spending many years on cruise ships, meeting my wife on the QE11.  We had our 30th Anniversary on Friday.

 Frank Connor, Hadlow, Kent, England:  October 21, 2007

Frank has written about the 'Edinburgh Crusaders' on the  Rocking Scots web site.

Frank adds

"I have been away from Edinburgh since 1966 (back for a period between 1974-76), so anything to do with Edinburgh and especially the Pleasance where I was brought up, I read with avid interest."

 Frank Connor, Hadlow, Kent, England:  October 21, 2007

Please click here to read Frank's memories of the Pleasance, and Dumbiedykes.

 

Message for Frank Connor

Hi Frank:  I think you may have changed your email address since you contacted me in 2007.  Can you please please email me to let me know your latest email address?  Then I'll pass it on to Danny Fraser, formerly of Dumbiedykes and now living in New Zealand, who would like to contact you.

Thank you.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  February 16, 2012

Update 1

Thank you to Maureen Hogg (née Connor) for providing Frank's email address.  I've now passed it on to Danny Fraser

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  February 19, 2012

 

Recollections

17c

Frank Connor

Joan Dunn, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA, wrote:

Your First Guitar

"I may not have seen you play music, but i know that you have followed music through your life.  I think we knew one another when you bought your first (blonde) guitar.

 I lived on St. Mary’s Street and then moved away.  I remember you (if it is you) visiting me at my grandparents’ home (The Pelosi Family) on Guthrie Street?"

Joan Dunn, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA: August 2, 2012

 

Recollections

18a

Harry Marshall

Tranent, East Lothian

Thank you to Harry Marshall ('Peets') for the messages below:

Harry wrote:

Arthur Street

"Hi.  My name is Harry (Pedersen) Marshall - 'Peets'.  I lived at 9 Arthur Street, top flat above the pub, 'Hares' when it was owned by J Robertson."

Streets and the 'Scotchie'

"Your site has brought back many poor and happy memories from my days there in the 1950s. 

I recognise everything that others have written about

-   from Jimmy Clark's school to Drummond Street

-   South Bridge, St Ann's, St Pat's

-  Sunday morning games of cards and football on the 'Scotchie'."

Young Brothers' Bakery

"I remember Prospect, Eastie, Middlie and Westie and of course Arthur Street.  Im my days. Young Brothers' Bakery was in Westie.  We were never short of cakes in those days.  Plenty of vans (haha)."

My Old Mates

"A lot of the lads went to the Pleasance Trust Boys' Club.

I see that one of my old mates from those days, Ian Stewart (Teeny) has written in.  I would be grateful if you could pass on my e-mail address to him."

Sorry Harry:  Ian's e-mail address has vanished from my PC.  I hope he reads this and contacts me again.  -  Peter Stubbs:  March 19, 2007

Harry (Pedersen) Marshall - 'Peets':  March 19, 2007

 

Recollections

18b

Harry Marshall

Tranent, East Lothian

Thank you to Harry Marshall ('Peets') for sending more recollections.

Harry wrote:

'Egy Pegy'

"It's great to see so many names that I remember from Arthur Street.  I wonder how many of them still remember or still speak 'Egy Pegy' we all spoke in those days.  It came in handy at the Palais Dancing."

I remember that from Yorkshire in the 1950s.  'Egy Pegy' was 'normal talking' except the sound 'eg' was added before each vowel sound.  -  Peter Stubbs]

Buckies for the Gaff

"I remember the Mussel/Buckie women, one outside the wee Anderson Pub, the other outside the pub at the top of St Mary Street. 

We got a 3d worth of buckies for the pictures, hoping we would not be searched going into the Gaff - the 'New Palais' -  after queuing half way up the High Street.

I remember the gas mantles, and the men  running down the Isle to pull the curtains along.  Saturday afternoon:  Superman, Roy Rogers, Hopalong Cassidy.  Those were the days!

I hope Teeny sees this and gets in touch."

UPDATE: Harry Marshall e-mailed me today, to tell me that he's now made contact with Teeny.  -  Peter Stubbs: 1 April, 2007: 

Harry (Pedersen) Marshall - 'Peets':  March 31, 2007

 

Recollections

18c

Daniel Duff

Thank you to Daniel Duff, another old pall of Teeny for the message below.

Daniel wrote:

Teeny!  Where are you?

"I was a great pal of Teeny.  We went about with each other  for years.  We also hung about at Oxgangs where his sister stayed we all had a great time when we stayed up the Southside.  I come from St. Leonards Hill myself but I palled about with Teeny and Derek Smith who is dead now, God rest his soul.

If you contact Teeny, tell him to get it touch with me ."

Daniel:  Harry Marshall (above) tells me that he has now made contact with Teeny.  I'll ask Harry to contact you and give you Teeny's e-mail address.

- Peter Stubbs,  3 April 2007

UPDATE 1

December 2011

Message from Teeny

I received an email from Teeny yesterday, so I now have his email address.

Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  December 4, 2011

 

Recollections

19

Carol Symonds (née Tierney)

Thank you to Carol Symonds, Wales, for the message below:

Carol wrote:

Dumbiedykes

"I was amazed and delighted to find these pages on the web.  I’ve been reading ‘Rebus’ stories and being an Edinburgh girl (now living in Wales) started thinking about past times. I’ve always been intrigued by the name ‘Dumbiedykes’ and wondered where it came from – now I know!!"

Dumbiedykes Road

"Anyway, I lived at 43 Dumbiedykes Road from 1951/52 to 1956/57 (can’t quite remember exactly). That’s the second court, I think. We were right next to the ‘brickies’ although I can’t remember them being called that but I’m sure my Dad will.  (I do remember the cockroaches!)"

People Remembered

" George and Lizzie Tierney, my grandparents, lived under us at Dumbiedykes Road.

George and Lottie Tierney are my Mum and Dad.  They're both are 82 this year.

Maureen and George Shaw lived above us with their parents.  Their granny lived above her.

Nellie, Alec and Brian Gilhooley, my Aunt, Uncle and Cousin all lived in the first court, I think.

Freddie and Auntie Jessie Tierney, my Uncle and Aunt  lived in the courts as well.

Jean and Jonnie, brother and sister lived next door to us – he used to work for the News, delivering papers.

I also remember Sandra Wright and Gordon Curran, Peter Bottomley and some of the other names on this site."

Schools

"I went to Milton House School from about 1952 to 1960 and did my qualifying and went on to Portobello Secondary.  We moved to Milton Road when I was 9.  It fair takes me back!!"

Carol Symonds (née Tierney), March 21, 2007

 

Recollections

20

Helene Waugh

Thank you to Helene Waugh for sending the message below.

Helene wrote:

Dumbiedykes Road

"I've just got myself a laptop and was fiddlin' about, getting used to the web etc. when I came across the Dumbiedykes pages.  How many memories it brought back to me!

I was born at 35 Dumbiedykes Road in 1944 and happily lived there till we had to move in, I think,1956

I was Helene Waugh; my mum was Bella and my dad was Bert;  I've got 2 brothers, Tom, the eldest and Robert (Rab).  We had a dugg cried Rusty.

Helene:  Have you noticed that Rab Waugh has sent a message in January 2007.  See Recollections 14 above.  

- Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  April 7, 20007

We were on the top balcony;  I remember the Moncrieffs, the Kelts, the Robertsons (Eddie), the Newmans (I think they were English), the Bremners, Norma, Anne and James.  Tam Panton was a wee laddie who lived with his grannie as far as I can remember.

We all lived in the First Court.  Does anybody have any photos?

On the other side of the road I remember the Archibalds and the McGoverns.

I loved the Dummy.  I was happy there and things were never quite the same after we moved; mind you we didn't go far. - just to Canongate, and I'm still there now, albeit on a part-time basis.

Does anyone remember me?    I'd love to hear from you."

Helene Waugh, Canongate, Edinburgh:  April 7, 2007

If you remember Helene Waugh and would like to contact her, please e-mail me and I will pass on your message to her.

- Peter Stubbs:  April 7, 2007

 

Recollections

20

Reply

1

Joan Dunn

Charlotte, North Carolina, USA

Thank you to Joan Dunn for replying to Helen Waugh's message in Recollections 20 above.

Joan wrote

Dumbiedykes Road

Neighbours

"We were on the top balcony at Dumbiedykes Road.

I remember:

-  The Moncrieffs

-  The Kelts

-  The Robertsons (Eddie)

-  The Newmans (I think they were English)

-  The Bremners, Norma, Anne and James.

Tam Panton.  He was a wee laddie who lived with his grannie, as far as I can remember.

Reply to Helene

"Helene:  I remember you well.  I think you were my inspiration to put my hair in ringlets!  I am beside you in the photograph, and have always kept you and your name in memory.

Which photograph might Joan be referring to here?  It may be one of the photos in Recollections 14 above.

- Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  August 21, 2012

If memory is correct, we were 'best friends' when you lived in Dumbiedykes, and I visited you on the Canongate.  Other things will probably come to mind when we talk.  It is great to reconnect with someone from that special time in life!"

Joan Dunn, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA:  August 2, 2012

Message Sent to Helene

I have sent an email to Helene to let her know about Joan Dunn's comments in her reply above.  I hope that Helene will still be using the same email address as she was using when she sent Recollections 20 to me about five years ago, and that my email will get through to her.

- Peter Stubbs, Edinburgh:  August 21, 2012

Update

Good news!  My message got through to Helene.  About half an hour after I sent my message to her, she replied:

Ringlets

"Joan and I went to Milton House together where we had the usual school photos taken.  I seem to recall that Joan and I were side by side with our hair in ringlets.  Oh, how we suffered to get those ringlets!"

Helene Waugh, Canongate, Edinburgh:  August 21, 2012

 

Recollections

21a

Grace Owen

Oxfordshire, England

Thank you to Grace Owen who wrote:

Arthur Street

"I was born in 17 Arthur Street in 1944.   

I am the youngest of six: James, Jessie, Walter, Margaret, Willie and Grace.  My mother's name was Maggie Owen.

We moved to Craigmillar in 1948-49."

Middle Arthur Place

"My auntie Bella Dunn/Simms lived in Middlie Middle Arthur Place) with my cousins Hendry, Billy and Carol."

Doctors, Bonfires and Shops

"I remember:

 Doctors McQueen and Gordon.

-  Bonfires in the middle of the street, with the heat almost cracking the windows of the houses nearby.

Wasn't there a wee sweetie shop owned by (i think,) Mr. Curran.!!  And Booths shop right there on the corner of Middlie and Arthur street?"

Grace Owen, Oxfordshire, England:  April 16, 2007

 

Recollections

21b

Grace Owen

Do you remember the Owens?

Grace Owen wrote:

"I would love to hear from anyone who remembers us.

My sister Jessie's best friend at the time was Chrissie McCormack. I think they moved to Pilton.

Is there anybody out there who remembers us? "

Grace Owen April 16, 2007

If you remember Grace, or any of her family, please e-mail me and I'll pass your message on to her.

Thank you.    -  Peter Stubbs:  April 16, 2007

Answer 1

Thank you to Tom Harrison, Edinburgh formerly of 10 Middle Arthur Place for sending his memories of the Owen family.

Tom added:

"Yes, I remember your mum and your family.  Us boys, your brothers included, would play fitba in the street with a rubber ball, and Jimmy was a good player.

Anyway, let your family know i do remember them dearly.  I still keep in touch with the Fallons, Bertrams, Fergusses and Forsythes.

Do you remember the McLartys?  They stayed on Arthur Street opposite your window to the right hand side, top flat at the foot of your stair on the left.

Drysdale's bakery was taken over by Rush and Jacksons.  I still remember the lovely smell of fresh bakery.

Take good care  best wishes. 

Thanks Tom:  I've passed your message on to Grace.

- Peter Stubbs:  August 24, 2007

Answer 2

Thank you to Mamie Scott (née Carr) who replied:

"Hi Grace.  I remember you and the rest of your family, not from Arthur Street but from when you moved down to Hay Terrace.

Friends

My friend is Irene Kerr, or Mitchell as she was.  She moved to Niddrie Mains Terrace from Middle Arthur Place when she was eleven, and we're still best pals.

I remember:

-  your Mum and your Granny well

-  James Jessie Walter and of course Margaret who went to the dancing with Irene my friend Ina and myself.

If I mind right, you went to America as Irene did at one point

I could go on all day Grace : Even though I didn't grow up in the town I knew a lot of people from the South Side :

-  David Bertram

-  Anne McLarty

-  Rab Waugh

-  Tam Miller

All went to Stewart's Dancing at Abbeyhill.

Those were the days ".

I will be meeting up with Irene soon and will tell her about our chat I'm sure she will want to get in touch.

Thanks Mamie:  I've passed your message on to Grace.

- Peter Stubbs:  September 4, 2007

Answer 3

Thank you to James A Rafferty who replied:

"I recognise some of the people your contributors mention.

Tom Harrison (answer 1 above) speaks about Donald and David Bertram,  Donald is now my brother-in-law.

My wife's family came originally from Holyrood Square.  They were the Kellys -  Rachel, Wullie, Tommy and my late mother-in-law Rose who was always known as Toots".

James A Rafferty, Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland  July 30, 2008

 

 

Recollections

22

Jim Robertson

Berlin, Germany

Thank you to Jim Robertson who wrote:

Friends

"My family are from 115 Dumbiedykes Road, just opposite Brown Street.  We moved to West Pilton around 1948-50.

My grandparents, Gormley, lived in Lower Viewcraig Row.

I was wondering if any of my old palls are still around:

-  Jim Chalmers?

-  John Morris?

-  Archie Adams?

to name but a few"

Shops

"I remember quite a lot, even after 50-odd years:

-  Barclay's grocers

-  Wee Nellie's paper shop

Do any of you remember the guy who used to come around and sing all the Irish songs for money?

What about the bonfires?  They were spectacular.

Fine memories and happy ones.

Contact

"If anyone knows me, or the whereabouts of anyone I have mentioned, please get in touch."

If you would like to contact Jim, please e-mail me and I'll pass your message on to him. 

Thank you.    -  Peter Stubbs:  May 6, 2007

Jim Robertson, Berlin, Germany:  May 6, 2007

 

Recollections

23

Liz Sproat

née Elizabeth Bell

Thank you to Liz Sproat (née Elizabeth Bell) who wrote:

Dumbiedykes Road

"I've just come across your web site - oh what happy memories it has evoked.

My parents moved to the Dumbiedykes in 1940 and we lived there until 1964"

Family

"We, the 'Bells' lived at 50/5 Dumbiedykes Road, just opposite the day nursery. Our family consisted of:

-  my mother, Isa (née Loumgair)

-  my dad, John,

elder sister Frances (1940)

 myself Elizabeth (1945)

-  younger brother John (1948)

 followed by surprise baby David in 1957."

The Balconies

"We lived in the "better" part of the road, in the balconies.  My childhood playmates were Peter Bottomley, Janet Tough, Helen Jack. Irene Fullarton and Anita Main who used to come up from Carlisle to visit her Granny during the school holidays.

John's friends were George McCutcheon, Helen Urquhart, Ronnie Robertson and, I think, some of the Graham boys from number 42.  David certainly played with the Grahams and the Watts who lived below us."

Christmas Presents

"I certainly remember the shops, like Miss Yardleys where I Christmas shopped buying such extravagant presents as 5 o'clock razor blades for my dad or a bar of Duncan's hazelnut chocolate!"

The Store

"There was Aggie, in the Bakery Dept of the Store, where you had to go to collect the milk on Christmas Day as the horse didn't come round that day. 

I remember sitting on the wooden bench in the Store grocers, waiting to be served, hoping that it wasn't George who could be a bit nippy but could count!"

'The Toffs'

"My father had his own blacksmithing business, and we were lucky as we had the first television in the street, the first phone, a car and also the luxury of a holiday hut at Port Seton!

How the toffs lived!!!

Shops

"In the 1940/50s the houses were all rented from Charles White & Co. and some were in pretty poor condition.  I remember there was a rent strike because essential repairs were not being carried out, and the tenants were taken to court.

My dad was a witness for the tenants but unfortunately they lost."

Move from Dumbiedykes

"We lived at Dumbiedykes until 1964 when we moved to Mountcastle Drive South where my father had built 2 bungalows.

The new house was great but my mother and I hated being so far out of town and the neighbours weren't the same  -  not like the good old Dumbiedykes."

Liz Sproat, Duddingston, Portobello, Edinburgh:  May 21, 2007

 

Recollections

24

Tony Henderson

Canada

Thank you to Tony Henderson who left the following message in the EdinPhoto guest book:

'The Scotchie'

"After the start of the war, they built air raid shelters on the empty space at 'The Scotchie'. 

When they took them down it went back to being empty space."

Tony Henderson, Canada:  June 28, 2007

 

Recollections

25

Catherine McKinsley (née Calvey)

Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England

Thank you to Catherine McKinsley for the recollections below. 

Catherine wrote:

The Calvey Family

"My mother's name was Bridget Calvey and my dad was called Sean/ John.

I am one of seven children.  My sisters and brothers were Mary, Bridget, myself, Rose-ellen, Annabel, John and Peter."

Move to the Dummy

"We moved from 150 High Street to the Dummy, as we called it then, in 1947. 

The 'Dumbiedykes Road' pages on this website brought  back many happy memories of the time I lived  there.  We moved, in 1947, to 156 Dumbiedykes Road, directly opposite Sutherland's Pub.  Our house had been a shop before we moved into it.

I attended St Anne's School in the Cowgate in 1947, then onto St Patrick's Junior School at  St John's Hill, just off the Pleasance."

Frends

"My best friend  was Ada Brawley who lived at Heriot Mount, I think at No. 5.  Ada had a wee sister called Sally and brother  called Maxi.

We palled around with:

-  Maggie Blyth, Peter Blyth, Jimmy Blyth

-  Lottie Johnstone and her wee brother Jimmy

-  Emily Kane

-  John Glancy

-  Margaret Burton (who lived above us in the Miller’s stair) **

-  Cathy Boyd

-  Ena Anderson.

** Daniel Duff, who wrote18c  (above) tells me that Margaret Burton is his cousin.

-  Peter Stubbs:  February 4, 2008

I also remember Patricia Kearnon from Dalrymple Place and Emmeline Pardy.   Patricia and I were in the same class at  St Pat's School."

There were two Miller families who lived in the stair next door to us:

Miller's’ the football players and

-  Jean and Alex Miller, top flat, my mum’s friends. 

They had three boys, Alex, Eric and Ronnie.  I remember Alex, he would have been about twelve /thirteen at the time.  He was a great artist.  He was always drawing me pictures from the Dandy and Beano comics.

I remember his mum and dad taking me away 'first footing' the year when my wee brother, Peter, was born at the end of December.

Shops

"I well remember:

-  'Jimmy's' Ice Cream shop, our local corner shop.  It was on the corner of Heriot Mount and Dumbiedykes Rd.

- On the opposite corner, in Carnegie Street, was a big grocer's shop.

-  Nellie Murray's newsagents and Carters sweet shop, just on the corner of the Dummy and Brown Street.

-  Barclay's was a bit further down the road.  It was opposite Salisbury Street

-   Granny Webster, the old lady we used to visit, who lived up above Nellie Murray's shop.  Our mother used to send us down with a bucket of coal for her fire.  We used to make her a cup of tea or go for any messages she needed."

At Play

"I remember:

-  the 'Henny' (the back green at Heriot Mount).  It was a magical place where girls played shops, champing away at all the different coloured stones to make all kinds of imaginary wares, and the boys played various games from cowboys & Indians, king Arthur or Robin Hood,  or whoever else was the character of the day. 

 the miner’s Gala in the King’s Park

-  Easter Sundays  we went to the King's Park, where we rolled our painted, boiled eggs down the hill, chasing after them like hares, trying to get to the bottom before the bouncing eggs did.   I don't know if this practice is still done today.

the street bonfires, swinging our fire-cans around our heads, without a care to danger.

-  Bobbie from the High Street Wash House?    Does anyone remember him? He earned his living carrying the washing home for our mothers.  I remember his rosy red cheeks and he was always laughing.  Yes: see High Street recollections 1

What happy memories!

Eric Gold, is right regarding the rats, mice, beetles and cockroaches.  I think every family owned a cat.  They had a field day keeping the colonies of vermin down."

Willie Allen's Hall

"When we were bored us kids, from the Dummy, used to visit, Willie Allen's Hall, situated just under Mrs Blyth's house and next to Jenny and her son Dod's house. 

Willie used to recharge all the wireless batteries for the people in the street.  He had all manner of magic junk in there.

I remember there was a big dummy of a soldier, stood in the hall.  Everything in there smelt musty.

He also had a painting of Salisbury's Crags on his wall, which he told us he had painted.   Maybe he did!

Winter

"Near Christmas,   we used to enroll ourselves in:

-  Maggie Martin's Mission Hall, along St Loenard's Street.  We took along our 'tinnies’ for our tea.  They were tied round our neck on a string.  Our lips would be roasted when we tried to drink the tea.

We always became regulars just before Christmas.  This ensured we got an invite to Maggie's Christmas party.

-  The Apostolic Church, Davie Street.

-  The Grassmarket Mission.  This is where we got the best Christmas presents from the Santa Clause. 

In the winter,  when our street got very Icy,  we used our mother's old shovels and skitted down the Dumbiedykes Road, having to walk  back up with wet , torn drawers."

Little Theatre Club

"Some of us were members of the Little Theatre Club, which took a crowd of us camping to  Berwick.  We all got got sent home early because my sister had climbed on the roof of the shed and broken it.   We were wild! 

I also remember a time when we were performing at the Little Theatre.  My sister, Bridget, played the part of Joan Of Ark,  Ada Brawley and I led a troupe of dancers on stage doing Scandinavia dancing.

Margaret Cassidy, from Arthur Street, sang and danced to the song   'I want a girl, just like the girl, that married dear old dad.'  She was great. She got a standing ovation.  It was a brilliant club.  It had everything to keep kids entertained"

Move from the Dummy

"I hated when we had to move to Craigmillar  around 1954/5.

 I've now lived in Peterborough for 36yrs, but still think fondly of The Dummy. 

Catherine McKinsley (née Calvey), Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England, August 31, 2007.

Questions

Catherine added:

1.  Has anyone got any photos of  Willie Allen's Hall or that side of our street?  I would love to see a photo of our old house again.

2.  Is anyone in touch with Ada Brawley?  I would love to hear from her again.

If you would like to send a message to Catherine in response to either of the questions above, please e-mail me and I'll pass on your message to her.

Alternatively, Catherine says:

"If anyone out there is in touch with Ada Brawley, please ask her to contact Missy Blyth and Missy will get in touch with me."

Thank you.    - Peter Stubbs:  September 2, 2007

Reply

I've just received a reply from Kathleen Robinson.

Kathleen wrote:

"Cath, I think I may have gone to school with you. My name is Kathleen Robinson maiden name Fender.  I lived on Marionville Road. I left Norton Park in 1957. Do you remember me?"

Message for Cath:  I tried to forward Kathleen's message to you by e-mail earlier today, but it was not delivered (twice), so I hope you read it here.  I've also given your e-mail address to Kathleen, so perhaps she'll have more success than I've had in e-mailing you.

- Peter Stubbs:  September 3, 2007

 

Recollections

26

Bob Henderson

Burdiehouse, Edinburgh

Thank you to Bob Henderson (ex Arthur Street, St Ann's and St Pat's) for the recollections below. 

Bob wrote:

Chippie

"There are several mentions of the chippie in Ingliston Street.  This was owned and run by Tommy Romano and his wife.  Tommy and my dad were in the ARP together and I always got a free poke of the best chips I have tasted then or since.

Thank you for bringing back such wonderful memories of my childhood there during the war and for a few years after."

Arthur Street

"When we lived at 17 Arthur Street (first floor) our window was directly above the blast shelter built in front of the tenement stair.  In the really bad winter of 1946-47, the snow drifted  almost up to the top of the shelter."

Coal Deliveries

"There are some references to Hugh Leckie.

Coal Lorry accident at the foot of Arthur Street ©

When we lived there the coal was always delivered by horse and cart.  I remember once seeing a horse being shot when it slipped on icy cobbles just about Middle Arthur Place and broke a leg."

Bookies

"I remember when Mr Broadbent the bookie had a win on the football pools just before Christmas one year and all the kids of his customers got a present that year.  My present was a plastic ukulele.

There was another bookmaker who stood at the top of Arthur's Street, outside the pub opposite the end of West Arthur Place. His name was Henry Fallon. The Fallon's were another of the families that moved into one of the new houses at Burdiehouse where I still live.

Rag Sorters

 I don't know for sure but it would be a real coincidence if a rag merchant who lived in Blair Street was not connected with the large rag sorting depot which was under the South Bridge in the Cowgate.

My mother's family came from Leitrim at the time of the Irish potato famine.  They lived, as most of the Irish immigrants did, in the Cowgate/Grassmarket area.

In birth and marriage certificates the women of the family are nearly all listed as rag sorters. I believe that in the 'forties and 'fifties this depot was run by Strachans, but I don't know when the Strachan family started or maybe took over there.

I hope this jogs someone else's memory and we get an answer for Rod.

New Houses

"Along with many other families, we moved to a new house in the suburbs.  I never knew such luxury, hot water on tap, a bath and toilet in the house and a gas fired copper boiler for my mum to do the washing.  The washing of course hung out in our own garden."

Bob Henderson, Burdiehouse, Edinburgh:  November 18, 2007

 

Recollections

27

Eric Gold

formerly known as Eric McKenzie

East End, London

Thank you to Eric Gold / McKenzie for this response to Bob Henderson's message above.

Eric wrote:

St Ann's School

"Bob Henderson's entry (above) caught my eye today.  I think I know him as he was at my schools but at what year?

He will know:

-  Wullie  and Alec Law

Donald and Davie Bertram

-  Henry's wee brother Brian Fallon.
We've shared a pint or two or *** (ha ha ha ha) at Rutherford's."

Chippie and Rag Store

    Looking to the west along Cowgate, and through one of the arches of South Bridge, towards the Grassmarket, around 1970 ©

I like Bob's entry on the chippie in Ingliston Street as I can still taste the chips to this day.

The Rag store in South Bridge in the Cowgate was called Nathan's.  I used to take rags there many a time."

Eric Gold:  East London:  November 20, 2007

Tony Ivanov, Bo'ness, West Lothian, replied:

Collecting Rags

"Eric Gold mentions Nathan's Rag Store in the Cowgate.

I too used to collect rags and earn pocket money by doing so. There was always a rag man who came regularly round the houses with a horse and cart and would give out balloons or a small toy in exchange for rags.

I remember that one day, as a child, I saw him taking his collection into Nathan's and I watched him getting money for them.  Something must have inspired me because I decided to do the same. I used to go round knocking on doors with my guider (bogey/go-cart for those who don't know) asking for old rags and clothing and taking them to Nathan's myself.

I did this almost every Saturday and earned a fair bit of pocket money. I didn't collect as much as the rag man but my guider was always full. Woolen items were the best to collect as these commanded a higher price."

Tony Ivanov, Bo'ness, West Lothian:  February 2, 2008

 

Recollections

28

Eric Gold

formerly known as Eric McKenzie

East End, London

Thank you to Eric Gold / McKenzie for another contribution, below.

 Eric wrote:

Box Player

"I had an uncle called Johnny McKenzie, nicknamed Joanie (ha ha ha ha).  He played the box (accordion)."

Trades Fortnight

"He used to stand at the top of the brae, outside Hare's pub, playing the box at Trades Fortnight, as all and sundry were going on holiday to Blackpool.

They would leave the pub on that Saturday night, catch the coaches at the top of the brae and off they would go.  There were about a dozen or so coaches. I wish someone had a photo of that regular event."

Johnny McKenzie

"If Joanie were alive today, he would have that Prospect street mystery*** solved as he knew Arthur Street and its history well.  He would spend hours in the library in George IV bridge looking things up.

He was married into our family.  He was born in the West Port and moved to the Grassmarket, then when he got married he moved in to Arthur Street and had a wee single-end in Prospect Street (ha ha ha)."

 Eric Gold, East End, London:  December 2, 2007

***  Eric's Prospect Street mystery is:

"When and why the houses on the 'Scotchie' side of Prospect Street  demolished?"

 Peter Stubbs:  December 2, 2007

 

Recollections

29

Bob Henderson

Burdiehouse, Edinburgh

Bob Henderson (26 above) had now made contact with Eric Gold / McKenzie (27, 28 above)

Bob mentions:

 -  'Middly':  Mid Arthur Place

 -  'Easty':   East Arthur Place

 -  'Westy':  West Arthur Place

These streets can be seen in this photo, looking down on Dumbiedykes, around 1950:

Looking down on Dumbiedykes and out towards Edinburgh Castle from Salisbury Crags  -  probably around the 1950s. ©

Bob wrote:

Arthur Street - Houses

"I lived and grew up in 17 Arthur Street. This was the tenement stair immediately opposite 'Middly'.  On the left of the stair there was a shop entrance, but used as a house and on the right of the stair there was another main door which you had to climb a short flight of steps to reach.

Just to the left of this was the bakery.  To get into it you had to go down a couple of steps.  About two or 3 stairs below the bakery was a chippie then a couple more and Willie Curran's shop, opposite the end of 'Easty'."

Arthur Street - Neighbours

"I am about 10 years older than Eric, so I did know the boys that he mentioned to me.

I can remember Rob Kerr from 'Easty'.  He was in my class at St. Pats was Rab Kerr.

The boys I remember from 'Middly' were Wullie Forsyth, Davy Forsyth and their wee brother and sister. Their dad was a warden and they had one of the shelters below their house.

Then there was Henry Fallon and his sister.  Their dad was the other bookie in Arthur Street.  He had lost the fingers on his right hand and held a pencil between his thumb and the stump of his first finger. He stood outside the pub opposite 'Westy'.

Next was Davy Bertram.  I think he had a wee sister too. There would of course be a lot more children born after we moved out to a new house in 1949.

There certainly were in my house I got a brother and another sister in our new house"

St Patrick's School

"When I was at St. Pat's school it was a 'boys only' school.  The girls only arrived in my last six months there.  It was, at that time, a great school for football and although it was all lady teachers they were out coaching us every playtime.

They also ran the three teams that we fielded every Saturday.  The teacher we had in the 'Qually Class' was Miss McMahon. 

The headmaster when I left was Hugh Boyle.  He later turned up at Holy Cross.

Bob Henderson, Burdiehouse, Edinburgh:  December 13, 2007

School and Church

Thank you to Bob Henderson for telling me the locations of schools, church and a  number of other nearby buildings that he remembers form the time when he attended St Patrick's school.

Please click on the image below to enlarge it.

Map of the Old Town of Edinburgh, including High Street, Cowgate and South Bridge  -  1830 ©

 

Recollections

30

Jim Robertson

Berlin, Germany

Thank you to Jim Robertson who wrote:

St Patrick's School

"Hi.  I was reading Bob Hendersons notes.  That could have been me writing them.  I was at St Ann's.  I started in 1943.  I was born in 1938.

Perhaps Bob and I were school mates? Rab Kerr was in my class. I can't remember anyone else though. I also had a run in with Cannon Burnie and his dreaded cane.

Did Bob Henderson come from the Dumbiedykes? If so where? I lived in 115 Dumbiedykes Rd.

Jim Robertson:  Message in EdinPhoto guestbook:  December 15, 2007

Bob Henderson also started at St Ann's School in 1943.  He lived at 17 Arthur Street, Dumbiedykes.

Bob replied:

St Patrick's School Class

"I was born September 1938 and I was in the same as Jim Robertson at St Pat's.  There were ten boys in the final class at St Pat's.  Here are the names of nine of them.  I cannot remember the name of the tenth.

Boys

Peter Brodie from St Mary Street.

-  Rab Henderson from Arthur Street.

-  Rab Kerr from Eastie.

-  Wullie Lennon from Prospect Street.

-  Tony McCormack from St Patrick square.

-  Desmond Mahon from ?

-  Wullie Ogilvie from Blackfriars Street.

-  Jim Robertson from Dumbiedykes Road

Paddy Tansey from perhaps Cowgate

In all the classes before the final year, that there would have been about another 20 or so others whose names are lost in the mists of time.

Somebody else who Jim may remember from the Dumbiedykes is Michael Moncreiff, and maybe his big brother James."

St Patrick's School Teachers

"The names of the teachers that stick in my memory are:

-  Sister Mary Angela.
-  Sister Gabriel.
-  Miss McMahon.
-  Miss Burnie "

Bob Henderson, Burdiehouse, Edinburgh:  December 15, 2007 and January 22, 2008

Eric Gold, who now lives in East London, also attended St Patrick's school.  Then, he was known as Eric McKenzie.

Eric wrote:

St Patrick's School Teachers

"Our teachers at St Pat's were

Mary Angeloe

-  Sister Gabriel

-  the fearful Mr Grecco - I'll never forget that guy!"

Eric Gold, East London:  January 28, 2008.

 

Recollections

31

Jackie Hamilton

Fife, Scotland

Thank you to Jackie Hamilton who wrote about a recent visit to Arthur Street.

Jackie wrote:

Arthur Street

"I took my mother, who is 82 years old, to visit Arthur Street today.  She  comes from a large family so, as a child, was regularly sent to stay with her grandma, Jessie Hunter, and  her grandad, 'Sauchie Bob' at Arthur Street..

My grandfather, James Hunter, lived in Arthur Street until he married my gran. Then they moved to Kirkcaldy, and then Cardenden, Fife.  James was awarded the Victoria Cross in the 1st world war.  His name is on a memorial in Edinburgh Castle."

Arthur's Seat

"She has vivid memories of exploring Arthur's Seat as a child.  On one particular occasion she met 2 girls, about her age, with a lady accompanying them. 

The 2 girls said 'Hello' to her and then passed by. She thought to herself 'I wish I had braw clothes like thay lassies' and continued down Arthur's Seat.

It was not until she reached the bottom that she was told that it was the Princesses Margaret and Elizabeth who had been in residence at Holyrood Palace and were out on an accompanied walk with this lady."

Museum and Play Park

"My mother also spoke of visiting a Museum at the top of street, to which entry was free, and a Play Park at the bottom of the street beside, Arthur's Seat."

Hunter Family

"My mother also spoke of visiting a Museum at the top of street, to which entry was free, and a Play Park at the bottom of the street beside, Arthur's Seat.

I would be grateful if anyone could give me more information on Arthur Street, or the Hunter family who lived there."

Jackie Hamilton, Fife, Scotland:  January 21, 2008

If you'd like to contact Jackie Hamilton, please e-mail me, then I'll pass on your message to her.

Thank You.  -  Peter Stubbs.

Recollections

31

Reply 1

Joe Jordan

Gracemount, Edinburgh

Thank you to Joe Jordan for posting a reply in the EdinPhoto Guestbook, in response to the comments that Jackie Hamilton wrote above, almost five years ago.

Joe wrote:

Hunter Families

"Browsing the site I came across Jackie Hamilton of Fife looking for the Hunter family in Arthur Street."

First Family

"One Hunter family stayed in 14 East Arthur Place and they had a girl called Nancy.  She was much older than me and I know that they were there well into the fifties."

Second Family

"The other family Hunter stayed in 32 Arthur Street. They stayed there prior to 1922 and the father's name was William Hunter, a baker by trade.

From 1932 onwards it was a John Hunter labourer who stayed there. They had two sons who were older than me and I always thought the family had left Arthur Street in the 1940s.

By sheer coincidence up at my ex-servicemen's club a year past new year. I got chatting to a stranger sitting next to me and it turned out to be one of the sons. He told me that the family stayed at No.32 well into the 1950s. I had my photo taken with him for old times sake."

Joe Jordan, Gracemount, Edinburgh:  Message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook: October 19, 2012

 

Recollections

31

Reply 2

Tom McLuskey

Shannon Lake, Westbank, British Columbia, Canada

Tom McLuskey replied:

Jackie Hunter

"When I attended Norton Park Secondary School, back in the 1950s, I palled around with a Jackie Hunter from Buchanan Street off Albert Street.  Maybe he was some relation."

Tom McLuskey, Shannon Lake, Westbank, British Columbia, Canada:
Reply 1 to message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook: October 19, 2012

 

Recollections

31

Reply 3

Jackie Hamilton

Fife, Scotland

Jackie Hunter wrote:

James and George Hunter

"I can check some of this info out with my mother who is 87 years old. Her dad, James Hunter, came from Arthur Street.  I know he had at least one sister but I'm not sure of her name;  perhaps my mother would know.

I know he had a brother, George, who joined the Black Watch and emigrated to Canada. (I have a copy of an old photo of him in his Black Watch Uniform.)

The father of the family got the nickname of 'Sauchie Bob'.  I have no idea when they left Arthur Street."

Tom McLuskey, Shannon Lake, Westbank, British Columbia, Canada:
Reply 1 to message posted in EdinPhoto guestbook: October 19, 2012

Recollections

31

Reply 4

Joe Jordan

Gracemount, Edinburgh

Joe Jordan posted this reply in the EdinPhoto Guestbook:

Arthur Street Area

Shops

"Hi Jackie:  I started to do a bit research on the shops in the Arthur Street area and it  escalated out of all proportion."

East Arthur Place

Families

"By pure coincidence I listed every family name in East Arthur PlaceMy research was every fifth year.  I have a Mrs Jessie Hunter living at 6 East Arthur Place in 1927 and also listed in the 1932 Post Office Directory.

 I did not move into Eastie until 1934.  There were only two houses in No.6 hence only two names then. It would be worth looking at the Post Office Directories on either side of these dates."

Joe Jordan, Gracemount, Edinburgh:  Reply posted on October 21, 2012
to a message posted in the EdinPhoto Guestbook on October 20, 2012.

Recollections

31

Reply 5

Joe Jordan

Gracemount, Edinburgh

Here is another reply that Joe Jordan posted in the EdinPhoto Guestbook.

The Wee Eyrie

"Hi Jackie:  one thing your mother would remember was that the entrance to the two houses in East Arthur Place was over a walkway with railings on either side. This is what we called The Wee Eyrie.  There were only two stairs like that ,Nos 6 and 14."

Joe Jordan, Gracemount, Edinburgh:  Reply posted on October 21, 2012
to a message posted in the EdinPhoto Guestbook on October 20, 2012.

Recollections

31

Reply 6

Eric Gold

Gracemount, Edinburgh

Eric Gold added:

The Hunter Family

"I've heard the name Hunter being used by my older siblings in the past.

There was a lady called Nancy Hunter who was the sister of my mum's best mate, Mary McLaughlin.

Nancy’s husband was Jack Hunter."

Eric Gold, East End, London, England:  October 25, 2012

 

Recollections

32

Bob Henderson

Burdiehouse, Edinburgh

Thank you to Bob Henderson who replied:

Arthur Street

"Fortunately there is still a remnant of the old street, the causies down almost as far as where  west Arthur place started."

Cobbles at the top of Arthur Street, now named New Arthur Place ©

Play Park

"Jackie's mum was spot on as regards her memory of a play park.  At the foot of Arthur Street, there was a safety entrance in the park wall -  no gate, just an offset arrangement that stopped one from running straight out into the road.

Once through this opening and inside the park, immediately on the right-hand side was a fenced-in swing park with two sets of four swings and a roundabout.

If you turned left on going through the entrance, you were faced with the abode of that terrible scourge of all of us boys, THE PARKY.

Further to the left, just beyond the Parky's house, was the bowling green which gave the pub on the other side of Dumbiedykes Road, it's name."

Museum

"Jackie's mum is twelve years older than me but I've not heard of any museum nearer than the National museum in Chamber Street, other than the one in the Surgeons Hall  which was not usually open to the general public.

You may be able to imagine what horrors our fertile minds populated it with.  To my amazement when I was old enough to visit it on the yearly 'open day', I found it was even worse than we had imagined."

Bob Henderson, Burdiehouse, Edinburgh:  January 21, 2008

If you'd like to contact Jackie Hamilton, please e-mail me, then I'll pass on your message to her.

Thank You.  -  Peter Stubbs.

 

Dumbiedykes  -  People & Play

Recollections 33 onwards

 

Contributors  Index

 

 

Dumbiedykes:   Streets  A-G     Streets  H-R    Streets  S-Z    More Pages

Edinburgh Photos

Edinburgh Recollections

Contributors

 

 

__________________

 

Links to Other Pages

EdinPhoto - Home Page  Please send me an e-mail ...  with your questions, comments, suggestions or news.   At any time, you can search for a word  -  perhaps a photographer's name or a photographic topic.  The search will produce a list of pages on the EdinPhoto web site where this word appears.     At any time, you can search for a word  -  perhaps a photographer's name or a photographic topic.  The search will produce a list of pages on the EdinPhoto web site where this word appears.  

Photographs and Other Images  -  These include portraits of photographers  -  photographic outings -  Princes Street views  -  Newhaven Fishwives  -  etc.  Early Photography in Edinburgh  -  Talbot, Brewster, Hill & Adamson, Early Professional Photographers in Princes Street, etc.  Professional Photographers in Edinburgh  -  1840 to 1940  -  Their names, dates of business and studio addresses.  The Photographic Society of Scotland  -  1856 to 1873  -  Lectures, Exhibitions, Outings, etc.  The History of Edinburgh Photographic Society  -  1861 to date  -  Lectures, Exhibitions, Outings, Poems, etc.  EPS Publications - EPS Handwritten Records  -  Photographic Journals  -  Trade Directories  -  Books  -  etc.  Thanks to all who have encouraged and supported me in creating the EdinPhoto web site  -  including descendants of photographers  -  researchers  -  providers of photographs and other material  Background notes on the research thal led up to the creation of this site  -   together with lists of new material added to the site since its launch.  Brief comments on how this site might be used  -  Just browsing?  -  Seeking specific information?  Please add your questions, suggestions or other comments to the Guest Book.  Links to other web sites  -  Photographic Societies  -  Photographic History  -  Family History  -  etc.  Click here to find the link to the Edinburgh Photogrpahic Society web site.

 

A selection of my photographs, many from Edinburgh throughout the year.   Also photos from Scotland, London, Iceland, Italy, Hong Kong and elsewhere    Many old maps of Edinburgh (Old Town, New Town, while City), Leith and Newhaven.  Includes several old transport maps and a comparison of old maps with recent aerial photos.   Old engravings, mailly of Edinburgh scenes.  Some from the 1820s, some from the 1890s,  some others - includes many hand-coloured examples from the 1820s.   News from Edinburgh today  -  Events, Collections, Buildings and Gardens, Transport   This site includes     1. Post card portraits taken in studios in Edinburgh:    2. Post card views either takeen/published by Ediburgh photographers or views of Edinburgh, or both.y Edinburgh    Views of Edinburgh, grouped into three sections:     1. Street views:    2. Buildings:    3. Around Edinburgh   Views of transport around Edinburgh  -  Horse drawn trams and buses, cable cars, electric trams, buses and a few railway photos.  Also several maps of Edinburgh's bus and tram routes.   Links to pages with Photos of Groups   Frequently Asked Questions

  Summary of the updates added to this site each month since the site was launched   Links to Dumbiedykes pages  Link to Granton pages  Link to Leith pages   Link to Newhaven pages   Links to Portobello pages   Link to My Recent Talks